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Mockingjay: Hunger Games Trilogy, Book 3 Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 3,685 customer reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I have to side with all the five-star reviewers!

I enjoyed reading this SO much! I thought that the characters, who we have learnt to love in the previous books, developed new layers to their personality - Peeta in particular! A lot of other reviews have suggested that Katniss is unlikable and that she becomes weak and 'whiney', but I found her one of the most relatable characters BECAUSE of her flaws. Her reactions to the trauma that she suffers makes this one of the most gut-wrenching books I've read.

I think that the source of a lot of disappointment for the other more negative reviews is that this story has a non-conventional ending. I think the ending may have alienated a lot of people as it's not a stereotypically 'happy ending' but, personally, I found this a fantastic thing! With other series of books I've read, notably Harry Potter, although I loved them, I found myself asking just how much of a happy ending there could be for the main characters when so many bad things have happened in their lives. I loved the bittersweet ending of Mockingjay, where we see a world still affected by the traumatic events of the past.

I think that in comparison to a lot of (dare I use the phrase) 'Young adult' fiction that shows a dull love triangle, this book shows that no matter what happens, there is always hope and I found this to be a refreshing message. This book won't be everyone's cup of tea but I would encourage everyone to read this book - but maybe ask them to forget about the conventional ending that they were probably expecting.

There are flaws in this book, don't get me wrong, but I would challenge anyone to find a perfect book. For me, I review a book depending on whether I felt anything for the characters and whether I would read it again. By those criteria, it deserves every one of those 5 stars.

I hope that this has been helpful in some way!
Comment 29 of 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
So, Mockingjay. I'm not going to lie - I am addicted, obsessed and completely loyal to this trilogy, so my review is reflective of that - but even so let me tell you, this book did not exactly bring me joy. It evokes a lot of emotions, yes but I was crying not smiling at the end of it.

Mockingjay stays true to its dystopian origins. While a lot will not agree with me, I feel that the grimness of the book is a part of its strength. In true dystopian fashion, it explores the downfall of human conscience and displays the worse of our attributes; like Hunger Games and Catching Fire, I was appalled by many of the events in the book and at points felt sick at the ability of the characters to act as cruelly as they do. At times I felt that Mockingjay borders on unbearable - exactly how grim can a book be? It seems that nothing close to happily ever after can be associated with this book, because believe me, it can be depressing.

I can't help but comment on all the political implications on this book, because the trilogy is far beyond just Katniss' story. The workings of the rebellion and the fight for freedom takes a bulk of the book and the tension spirals out of control in many of its pages.As the mockingjay, Katniss traverses the thin line that divides both sides. I love the twisted, wicked feel of the battle because that was exactly how I imagined it to be. Not only full of secrets, but full of dark aims and uncertainties.

There is a lot I can say about how the characters' fates are sealed. We know beforehand that there will be deaths; what we do not know is who will die. Or exactly how many. As it turns out, no number of speculations could possibly have prepared me for the depressing turn of events in Mockingjay.
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Format: Paperback
As loads of other reviews have said, this novel was very unsatisfying in it's ending. The build up with the previous two books and even up to the middle of this book created a springboard platform for the ending to be great. Instead Miss Collins decided to leave nothing with a satisfying or even justified end. She killed off good characters (mainly Finnick). She ruined the love triangle by leaving Katniss with Peeta, who it appeared she never loved anyway, and just binned off Gale to District 2 as if he didn't even exist in Katniss's life. And how events developed with overthrowing President Snow in the end was awful! It almost gave an impression of nothing changing at all for the better, with the rebels in control!

Overall, I felt very frustrated at the conclusion of this trilogy. The lack of storytelling finesse was mind boggling. It should not have been published without a serious revision to the storyline.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I loved the first Hunger Games book. Liked the second. Hated the third. Probably hated it all the more because it is such a let down after the first two. There was so much potential to wrap the story up well and make a really dramatic statement, but this book is just filled with complex, interminable and pointlessly detailed battle scenes, and Katniss having a completely uncharacteristic breakdown. If you have read the first two, don't bother with this one, it'll ruin it all for you. I'm feeling quite bitter about that.

I think the problem is that Ms. Collins was rushed. As a writer myself, I know about deadlines, and I think that with the first two books selling like the new Twilight, she was put under too much pressure to get book 3 out as quickly as possible. It shows in that some of the writing really is quite juvenile and unpolished. I felt a bit like a teacher saying to her "I KNOW you can do better than this." I really wish she'd told her agent, editor, publisher and readers where to get off and taken all the time she needed to make a really satisfying conclusion to the trilogy.

SPOILER ALERT: To save you having to buy and struggle through this book, I'm going to summarise what happens.

District 13 is alive and well and underground, and Katniss is taken there following the end of book 2 where her mother and Prim are living with the other survivors of District 12. It's ruled over by President Coin, who asks Katniss to be the symbolic mockingjay to unite the districts against the capital. Katniss does so, but starts to realise that Coin is just as corrupt and cruel as Snow and would be just as much a tyrant were she to gain his power. The Districts do all rebel, all-out war ensues with huge loss of life.
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