Mission to Paris and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Mission to Paris has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in nice condition, clean with no missing pages and minimal markings. The pages may be slightly dog eared but overall in great shape. It is fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mission to Paris Paperback – 7 Mar 2013

61 customer reviews

See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£3.21 £0.01
CD-ROM
"Please retry"
£22.58
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Mission to Paris + The Foreign Correspondent + Blood of Victory
Price For All Three: £25.97

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: W&N (7 Mar. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753828987
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753828984
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2 x 20.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 151,729 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Alan Furst has lived for long periods in France, especially in Paris, and has travelled as a journalist in Eastern Europe and Russia. He has written extensively for Esquire and the International Herald Tribune.

Product Description

Review

A pacy read with plenty of intrigue and glamour. (TELEGRAPH & ARGUS)

A pacy, atmospheric spy story in the typical Furst style. (GOOD BOOK GUIDE)

Book Description

The author of TV Book Club's SPIES OF THE BALKANS returns with a hugely evocative thriller set in wartime Paris. Includes Reading Group Notes.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By M. D. Ripley on 18 Jun. 2012
Format: Hardcover
Loyal followers of Alan Furst's closely observed and highly atmospheric novels of spies and politics in Europe just before and during WWII will recognise one familiar (Hungarian) character in "Mission to Paris" (originally slated as "The Spies of Paris"), but new readers should not despair if they don't. It simply means they face the delicious prospect of discovering Furst's backlist of at least ten more brilliant novels. In this canon of work, Alan Furst has shown (and hopefully will continue to show) an iron grasp of the complexities of European history, politics and culture, into which he places characters who on the surface are compeletely out-of-their depth swimming against the tide of Fascist tyranny. The one thing Furst's characters have going for them is always that although they may be flawed human beings, they know that for evil to succeed all it needs is for good men (and women) to do nothing.
Do not expect bombs, exhibitions of unarmed combat, car chases or super-hero pyrotechnics. The level of violence in one Furst's books is usually on the same level as that in the movie "Casablanca" - when it's needed, it's there and it makes a point. But that is not to say his books are not thrilling - and occasionally downright chilling. In "Mission to Paris", the methods of an official Nazi press agency (actually a front for political warfare) are explained as follows (I paraphrase): "We (the Nazis) don't send out press releases, we send out operatives - and then let other people issue the press releases...."
"Mission to Paris" is a novel of close-plotting, immaculate history, rich atmosphere and fine, fine writing.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By R Russell on 15 Jun. 2012
Format: Hardcover
I came to Alan Furst after Spies of the Balkans and have been busily reading his older books ever since. When I heard he had a new novel out I thought I should probably wait until it came out in paperback and finish reading his older books instead but yesterday I just couldn't resist and I bought the hardback of Mission to Paris. And I'm so glad I did because I feel as though I've just time travelled - the descriptions of pre-war Paris, and Hungary, are so well done, I feel as though I've actually been there. This is a gorgeous book, and even better and more accessible than his others. I'm not a history buff, and my only quibble with his other books is that I sometimes feel don't feel informed enough. But Mission to Paris takes you straight to the heart of the events in a way that is totally gripping and totally accessible. And there's a great love story too. My wife told me she'd never read a book about spies and war but then I made her read a few pages and now she is hooked - perhaps because of the dishy film star hero! Maybe tonight I'll be the one telling her to put the light off and go to sleep! I can't recommend this book enough.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Priscilla on 10 Aug. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Alan Furst continues to write gripping accounts of the period around and during the Second World War, mostly set in France. His latest novel does not disappoint and as usual manages to evoke quite brilliantly life in Paris in 1938, with the increasing fear and violence as well as the differing attitudes of the French people towards the imminent invasion of France.

To begin with, the hero of the novel, Fredric Stahl, appears to be less committed towards the struggle against the Nazis and one's sympathies towards him are therefore less engaged. However, as his determination not to be used as a Nazi puppet grows, so does our affection and we are desperate for his survival.

Alan's understated description of the horrors awaiting the European Jews as they struggle for survival with their attempts to escape from Germany, only to find that they are still not safe in their new country, brings alive the feelings of terror and desperation as every avenue to freedom is blocked.

Renate Steiner's character is particularly attractive - not a beauty in the physical sense, but full of determination and courage with the underlying feelings of fear of the refugee, always looking over her shoulder and not sure whom to trust. Fredric Stahl did well to choose her over the shallow and self-serving Kiki de Saint Ange.

Roll on the next book!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stratman on 2 Oct. 2013
Format: Paperback
Having had the works of Furst bigged up to me by various friends who thought that because I have enjoyed the works of Phillip Kerr and David Downing I would enjoy this I settled down to this novel with some anticipation. I must say that I thoroughly enjoyed "Spies of the Balkans" and thought it engaging, well plotted and well written. Imagine my disappointment when completing this book, which, in the edition I read it in (TV Book Club) read as though it were written as a primer for people who don't really like reading and need encouraging. Either that or it was written to be read on public transport by the part time engaged either on their phones, kindle or igadget.

Mission to Paris is competently written, in a workman like way and it is similarly plotted (but reads as though it were designed for film or TV) and consequently it has little depth, little engagement. As a reader I did not sympathise with the characters who were presented in a sequence as a series of two dimensional character pastiches drawn from a welter of influences mostly from US cinema. The ambiance ois entirely derivative from other works which try to capture Paris in the summer of 1938 (JPS trilogy springs to mind)or at least some of it. The book is light on substance and history and plot events are not intricately woven and thus, in comparison to any of Kerr's books this book feels and is superficial.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback