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Mishima Soundtrack

4 customer reviews

Price: £24.58 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
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£24.58 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (9 April 1990)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Nonesuch
  • ASIN: B000005IXM
  • Other Editions: Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 61,202 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Mishima/Opening
2. November 25: morning
3. 1934: grandmother & Kimitake
4. Temple Of The Golden Pavilion ("like some enormous music")
5. Osamu's Theme: Kyoko's House
6. 1937: Saint Sebastian
7. Kyoko's House ("stage blood is not enough")
8. November 25: Ichigaya
9. 1957: award montage
10. Runaway Horses ("poetry written with a splash of blood")
11. 1962: body building
12. November 25: The Last Day
13. F-104: epilogue from Sun And Steel
14. Mishima/Closing

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Warren M. Fisher VINE VOICE on 17 Dec. 2002
Format: Audio CD
Probably one of Glass' most accessible works and also most recognisable from its frequent use in film and television. A masterpiece from beginning to end, featuring some of Glass' most beautiful and haunting music. The November 25 pieces alone provide a muscular, propulsive power with their pounding martial percussion and throbbing strings. A potent score to accompany Paul Schrader's powerful movie, the music also stands alone as a complete work to accompany Glass' other portrait pieces.
Moving, exhilarating and unforgettable music from the greatest voice in contemporary classical music.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Phillip Robinson on 1 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is a soundtrack that is best heard in the context of the story of the film that it is part of (Mishima - A Life in Four Chapters and the life and writings of Yukio Mishima). The film is best described as interesting, however for me it is in many ways carried by this music - I have never heard a musical theme that is so adept at portraying an underlying meaning. What is particularly striking is the thread of exhaltation and death. It runs through the film but especially the soundtrack and, when one subsumes oneself, is more complete an emotional response to the film than the film itself. I do not mean this as a justification of Mishima's actions or worldview, just as a disturbing but undeniably exhilarating response to the story.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
You don't need to know what "Minimalism" is all about to appreciate this CD.
And if you are thinking of watching the art house film of the same name,
listen to this first because I said so.
The film is a bit like Bowie, in Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (said it wrong).
but moreso.
Whereas this album stands alone by the way it has been compiled. After a
few listenings you will definitely enjoy it more each time. I am not sure if it
is appropriate to "love" this music becasue of the themes, and setting; but
boy oh boy, it is deep. Japanese formalism at its sublimation point.
Its a bit like that Sean Connery film where they are investigating a triad
murder (Red Sun); but the experience is most certainly worth it.

There is beauty in such stuff. If you are a post-modern eclectic, then you
need this.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Mishima Closing (track 14 on the cd) is surely one of the finest and most poignant pieces of modern classical music.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 20 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Mishima 23 Jun. 2001
By "shaolindragon88" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I have listened to other Phillip Glass works. I find Phillip Glass to be abstract, like a Rothko painting. It is mesmerizing and challenging, but rarely does it take you a level of passion that this work, Mishima, does.
Perhaps it is the subject matter. The complex and not easily explainable life of writer Yukio Mishima.
The movie studies the odd life of Mishima by examining his novels. The underlying themes of self-obsession, narcism, deep passion, and aweseome forces of beauty through death, are captured very well through musical expression.
Each piece captures some essence of its subject matter, without being pandering or obvious. Other than the wind chimes in the Intro, there are no obvious references to Japanese music, ala Madame Butterfly.
The melodic elements are most certainly western, yet its interpretation of the human feelings behind each of the stories is quite universal and rises above stereotype. You need not love Japan or Japanese music or literature to love this work.
It uses the traditional dramatic structure of a movie to move you from scene to scene. The final climax of Mishima's suicide is understood musically, as the the climax of a life's work. Whether or not we morally agree with Mishima's act, it serves as a symbol how each us move to some sort of great work of art which is our own lives.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Astounding 12 Jan. 2000
By Michael Sweeney - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the most passionately spiritual pieces of music I have ever heard. Like all of Phillip Glass' scores, it stands well on its own as a seperate entity. Perhaps because of the subject matter and most definitely because of Glass' overt bent towards Eastern spirituality combined with his western rhythmic sensibilities, this disk is essential. I can't recommend it enough.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Glass's breakthrough.... 26 Feb. 2003
By stuartm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
for me at least. This was the first CD of his where the full emotional potential of his music was realized. Some credit is due the Kronos Quartet who have never been better then they are here. And the remainder goes to PG for moving beyond the confines of strict minimalism to incorporate elements of traditional melody and harmony within the rhythmic structure of his compositions.
This is accessible, powerful, emotional music and has never worn out its welcome.
BTW, the final scene in the Truman Show uses the main theme of this soundtrack, so if you found the triumphant "rush" of that finale compelling, you will love to hear the rest in this soundtrack.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The music that never leaves you! 18 Feb. 2003
By B.C. Francis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I was first introduced to the soundtrack from Mishima in 1986 by a young woman from LA. That may have been a part of why it stayed close to me... but I was entranced by Phillip Glass' music.... and this was the first I had ever heard from him! I sought out other Glass works, but none enthralled me as Mishima had done. I kept a crude cassette copy of this soundtrack for many years... until it wore out, frankly! 15 years later I remembered the haunting movie music, and bought the CD. Now, more than ever, I wanted to see this film! It did not do well at the box office and was supposedly under-rated, but Glass' music was definitely it's saving grace. I was completely captivated with the film as I watched... but I constantly found myself following the music, and not paying attention to the screen. It brought the sad and weird story of Mishima to life... yet it stands completely on it's own. The Kronos quartet performs marvelously. The music never leaves you!.... never!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Breakthrough Score 4 Dec. 2007
By David A. Wend - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I saw Mishima when the film came out in 1985 and have always been impressed by the score. Not only is the music beautifully descriptive of the scenes of the film but it also is music that can be enjoyed apart from the film. The tracks on the disc follow the progress of the film from the opening and November 25 music on to the closing. The brooding music of track 4 - The Temple of the Golden Pavilion - is marvelously conceived, building slowly in intensity. Osamu's Theme is scored for electric guitar and violin: an interesting coupling and the guitar is also used very effectively in Kyoko's house where a synthesizer joins.

The Kronos Quartet are the stars of the performers and convey the brooding intensity of the music magnificently. The Runaway Horses track is close to a mini-string quartet and is a nice example of their playing. This is a short film score and I would have liked a more expanded booklet but it is a joy to have this wonderfully descriptive music at hand. The score by Philip Glass is so integral to the complete enjoyment of Mishima that without it (just like the narration by Roy Scheider) one cannot separate it from the film images.
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