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The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events) Hardcover – 1 Dec 2001


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Egmont Books Ltd; First Edition First Print edition (1 Dec. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749747021
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749747022
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 13 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 132,105 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Lemony Snicket was born before you were and is likely to die before you as well. He was born in a small town where the inhabitants were suspicious and prone to riot. He grew up near the sea and currently lives beneath it. Until recently, he was living somewhere else.

Mr Snicket first received his education from public schools and private tutors, and then vice versa. Early in life, he learned to reupholster furniture, a skill that turned out to be far more important than anyone imagined. He has been hailed as a brilliant scholar, discredited as a brilliant fraud and mistaken for a much taller man on several occasions.
A studied expert in rhetorical analysis, Mr Snicket has spent the last several eras researching the travails of the Baudelaire orphans. During his spare time, he gathers evidence and is considered something of an expert by leading authorities. Recently, he had to give up his hobbies due to laws regarding musical performances in mountainous terrain.

Lemony Snicket published his first book in 1999 and has not had a good night's sleep since. Mr Snicket is the author of quite a few books, all dreadful, and has been falsely accused of many crimes, all falsely. Once the recipient of several distinguished rewards, he is now an escapee of several indistinguishable prisons. He is widely regarded as one of the most difficult children's authors to capture and imprison. There are thirteen books in the A Series of Unfortunate Events, which should be avoided at all costs.

To his horror and dismay, he has no wife or children, only enemies, associates, and the occasional loyal manservant. Lemony Snicket's extended family, if they were alive, would describe him as a distinguished scholar, an amateur connoisseur, and an outright gentleman. Unfortunately this description has been challenged of late, but Egmont Press continues to support his research and writing on the lives of the Baudelaire orphans. As he continues with his investigation, interest in the Baudelaire case has increased. So has his horror.

Until recently, he was presumed to be 'presumed dead'. Instead, this 'presumed' presumption wasn't disproved not to be incorrect. Most things written about him are not true, but this is. More miserable news about Mr Snicket and his dreadful books can be found at www.unfortunateevents.com.

Product Description

Review

'A return to the dark pages sad orphan tales result in happy book sales' New York Post

From the Back Cover

Dear Customer,
I hope, for your sake, that you have not chosen to listen to this CD because you are in the mood for a pleasant experience. If this is the case, I advise you to put it down instantaneously, because of all the volumes describing the unhappy lives of the Baudelaire orphans, this might be the unhappiest yet. Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire are sent to Paltryville to work in a lumbermill, and they find disaster and misfortune lurking behind every log.
These include, I’m sorry to inform you, such unpleasantries as a giant pincher machine, a bad casserole, a man with a cloud of smoke where his head should be, a hypnotist, a terrible accident resulting in injury, and coupons.
I have promised to record the entire history of these three poor children, but you haven’t, so if your customers prefer stories that are more heartwarming, please feel free to make another selection.
With all due respect,
Lemony Snicket

--This text refers to the Digital Download edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Mar. 2005
Format: Paperback
A fantastic book to read. For 9 and overs because there are quite difficult words in it. I liked the bit when Count Olaf dressed up as a woman, because it was funny. There was alot of surprising events which kept me on the edge of my seat, waiting to find out more. Someone who enjoys adventures would enjoy this book because the three children have to work in a lumber mill and have lots of adventures doing so. The three children only eat gum for their lunch and at dinner they have a bad casserole. This book is the funniest one in the series yet, it is also exciting, dark, with other surprises on the way.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Fantasy Lore on 28 Mar. 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although Snikett takes a different direction in book 5, this 4th book in the series of Unfortunate Events is just as inventive and surprising and probably my favourite up to this point, with the exception of book 1. To me this definitely didn't feel like a repeat of previous books, on the contrary- I found the content both refreshing and at the same time familiar enough for me as a fan to feel at home.
In some ways this is similar to previous books i.e. a clueless guardian, a disguised Count Olaf and a series of unfortunate events that the siblings must overcome using their inventiveness, knowledge and sharp tooth, respectively. So all we've come to expect, really. But there are also several new elements that keep the reader both gripped by the story and constantly guessing, as to what will happen next.
In the 'Miserable Mill' the continued story of the Baudelaire's that was waning in book 3 feels renewed and invigorated by new characters and unusual events. Count Olaf, although still present in all his horrid glory, takes a back seat to some very despicable new characters who attempt to thwart Violet, Klaus and Sunny in their perfectly reasonable pursuit of a calm and contented childhood. The Boss character for example is captivating- he may only have one facial expression, but he just makes a fantastically menacing character for the reader to love to hate.
With this book I felt more than ever before that the author was gradually upping the anti, putting the siblings in greater and greater danger and so providing the reader with greater thrills.
Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Mar. 2005
Format: Paperback
This is the fourth book of the series and sees the Baudelaire Orphans dropped off to their newest guardian, the mysterious 'Sir' of Lucky Smell Lumbermill.
The story starts with the ominous - which here means the Baudelaire Orphans were reminded of Count Olaf - eye shaped building. The children meet a variety of people from the optimistic Phil - optimistic means someone who is irritatingly bright and cheerful even when normal people would be crying in a corner - to the horrible Foreman Flacutono - horrible here means wakes people up with the banging of two pots rather then with the clanging of the alarm clock, rooster or fire alarm. It is a shame that the nice people the children meet never have any influence, like Charles. Look out for Count Olaf who enters the stage in his best disguise yet!
All in all (a phase here which means I've said enough and tried not to give anything away) this is a good, easy read story. I would like to add a caution to my review for younger reader: there are squeamish bits in the book - squeamish here means the death of a character and the squashing of another.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Dec. 2004
Format: Paperback
I loved this book so much, that when I finished reading it the first time, I started to read it again. Without giving the story away, my favourite part was Count Olaf's disguise as the receptionist at the eye shaped building. Once you've read this book, you'll be itching to get your hands on book 5, the Austere Academy.
Calum - age 11
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Dec. 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is a very good book. If you enjoy books by authors like Roald Dahl or JK Rowling you will love this book. It is the fourth book in the series of unfortunate events by Lemony snicket. After living with Aunt Josephine, the Baudlaires find themselves living with a relative who forces them to work in a lumber mill for no pay.
If you read other books in this series you should buy this book. You won't be disappointed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By bernie VINE VOICE on 15 Oct. 2003
Format: Hardcover
Once again the Baudelaire orphans are transplanted in what will turn out to be a "Series of Unfortunate Events.” Their newest home is the Lucky Smells Lumbermill dormitory.
Here once again Lemony tells the meaning of many words (usually with words that need the meaning explained.) We are treated to the difference of literally and figurative among other such concepts.
Naturally they think everyone is Olaf. And of course they are correct. A mystery has to be solved and to do this Violet must learn Klaus's skills of reading apprehension. Then there are lives to be saved and Klaus must learn Violets' inventive skills. Sunny stays En garde.
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By Cloggie Downunder TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Mar. 2013
Format: Paperback
The Miserable Mill is the fourth book in A Series of Unfortunate Events by American author, Lemony Snicket (aka Daniel Handler). As we once again join the unlucky Baudelaire orphans, they are deposited at the Paltreyville train station by the manager of their estate, Mr Poe. They are to live (and apparently, work as well) at the Lucky Smells Lumber Mill, which is owned by their new guardian, whose name is so unpronounceable, he is referred to as Sir. Having already suffered the loss of their parents, the threat of marriage, and the murder of their Uncle Monty and Aunt Josephine at the hands of the evil Count Olaf and his nefarious assistants, the siblings are ever-vigilant of his reappearance. Luckily these well-mannered and uncomplaining children are also very resourceful: Violet invents, Klaus reads and Sunny bites. Snicket's tone throughout is apologetic, sincere and matter-of-fact as he relates the unfortunate events in the children's lives; his imaginative and even surreptitiously educational style will hold much appeal for younger readers. This instalment, our protagonists work in a lumber mill, are paid in discount coupons, given chewing gum for lunch, meet a somewhat irritating optimist and wind up counting themselves lucky to be alive. For a change, Violet reads, Klaus invents and Sunny acquits herself well in a sword fight. Hypnotism, a circular saw and gum all feature importantly. As always, the alliterative titles are delightful and Brett Helquist provides some wonderfully evocative illustrations. Are the Baudelaire Orphans destined for boarding school? I guess we will find out in The Austere Academy.
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