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Mind Change: How digital technologies are leaving their mark on our brains Hardcover – 21 Aug 2014


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Rider (21 Aug. 2014)
  • ISBN-10: 1846044308
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846044304
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 3.1 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 93,136 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Greenfield asks key questions…important…should be read by technologists in particular" (Nature)

"Greenfield is not just an engaging communicator but a thoughtful, responsible scientist, and the arguments she makes are well supported and persuasive" (Mail on Sunday)

"Greenfield’s admirable goal to provide an empirical basis for discussion is…an important one" (Financial Times)

"Fascinating...highly accessible...Greenfield is a lucid and thorough communicator" (Independent on Sunday)

"Greenfield has a point, however unfashionable it may be...an interesting polemic and a starting point for further debate" (Frank Dillon Irish Times)

Book Description

Highly topical, stimulating addition to the most important debate of our time (the effects of new technology), by one of the UK's leading neuroscientists.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S Rahman on 25 Sept. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
a scientist writing about complex subject of mental processes in a clear and nonjargon way for non-science reader.some exciting revelation about human brain and consciousness. I enjoyed reader it
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris TOP 100 REVIEWER on 10 Mar. 2015
Format: Hardcover
If the mind is what the brain does, then the ever-accelerating increase of data to be processed creates new challenges for our cognition skills and their support resources. In this context, I am again reminded of an observation by Charles Darwin: "It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is most adaptable to change."

I hope that Susan Greenfield is right: "The human mind will adapt to whatever environment in which it is placed. The cyberworld of the twenty-first century is offering a new type of environment. Therefore, the brain could be changing in parallel, in corresponding new ways. To the extent to which we can begin to understand and anticipate these changes, positive or negative, we will be better able to navigate this new world. So let's probe further into how Mind Change, just like climate change, is not only global [begin italics] global [end it italics] but also [begin italics] unprecedented [end it italics], [begin italics] controversial [end it italics], and [begin italics] multifaceted [end it italics].
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By malolm james moss on 11 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Superb book by brilliant neuro chemist who writes in an easy style that ordinary folk can understand and enjoy. Should be compulsory reading for all teachers, parents and particularly for all father's on paternity leave. Had the potential affect of video games and the internet been available to myself I would have installed restraints on my children - perhaps lobbying that before the dopamine hit of the video game there would be an entry fee of a little readig / comprehension with the "reward" being the game terminating at 7-00pm. It explained those "stupid" excercises that cured a son's Dyslexia presumably by affecting a Brain Change. Do hope you enjoy
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a thought provoking and challneging wake up call to everyone. It addresses how our brains are adapting to the Google world at a cost.Some pwerful arguments backed up by quality research and advocacy. Offers an intelligent review of a wide range of psychological research.
The big shame is that what Susan Greenfield needs is a powerful meme to help spread her ideas and issue - and you get the idea that she hopes 'Mind Change' will serve as her shorthand word of mouth wake up call. Unfortunately the name 'Mind Change' is too bland and anodyne to work as an effective meme.
Nonetheless, take it form me, this a must read for anyone who wants to create a better world.
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Format: Hardcover
Thought provoking, this was a book I took notes from and continued to think about after I'd finished it. Greenfield chapter by chapter addresses the ways in which the potential plasticity of the human brain interacts with internet technology and gaming. She uses reams of experimental data and is not afraid to admit to contradictions and grey areas. I found it incredibly useful as a framework to reflect on how thousands of years of human evolution has or has not prepared us for technology that has and is changing so fast.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent book aimed at a wide audience. Well-wriiten with plenty of references to research (without being too academic). It's an important book too: it brings an enlightening view of the the effects of digital technologies on such a substantial proportion of the world's population - especially the young (digital natives as she calls them). She points out many of the dangers of over-use and its potential to alter the way in which we relate to others.

Every parent should read this book!!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. H. A. Jones TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Dec. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Mind Change: How digital technologies are leaving their mark on our brains by Susan Greenfield, Rider (Ebury Publishing), 2014, 384 ff

Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE is a Senior Research Fellow at Lincoln College, University of Oxford. She has written several books on various aspects of brain anatomy and physiology and is one of the most lucid speakers and writers I have read or heard. This book is about how our brains may be changing in response to the cyber technology that now forms the core of our existence for many of us.

Between 80% and 95% of all American households now have a computer. In Britain, there are 83 million mobile phones in use among a population of 64 million (Internet statistics, Dec 2014). These possibly alarming statistics have arisen within the last fifty years and the author urges caution or at least conscious awareness of where this trend is taking us. She refers back to Teilhard de Chardin’s beneficent view of the ‘noosphere’, a stage of spiritual development where all individuals would share a common consciousness of a cohesive universal energy that many would call God. Greenfield is suggesting that perhaps the noosphere has arrived in the form of digital technology, but with not always such benign intent: ‘you can monitor the flood of consciousness of others, almost as a way of life’.

These are ‘unprecedented times’: we have no previous similar experience to help us understand how this new technological development may change us, not only sociologically but perhaps anatomically too. This and other books highlight the fact that children spend far more time indoors now and far less outdoors playing, leading to a ‘nature deficit disorder’ and here Greenfield cites the evidence presented in the book “Toxic Childhood” by Sue Palmer.
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