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Microsoft.NET [Paperback]

Fergal Grimes
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

11 Jan 2002 1930110197 978-1930110199 1
Learning Microsoft .NET from books is not easy. You've got to become familiar with an extensive new class library and a new runtime environment. Even for seasoned Windows developers, this process almost amounts to a fresh start. Unlike many other books, Microsoft .NET for Programmers accelerates you through the learning curve. Written for the intermediate or advanced programmer, Microsoft .NET for Programmers is one of those rare books that builds on your existing knowledge to teach you exactly what you need to know to develop Microsoft .NET applications.  

Why? You'll find%20in%20a%20full%20case%20study%20that%20takes%20you%20through%20the%20design%20of%20an%20application" to of a

This compact book is packed with details that will help you quickly grab hold of the fundamental concepts of dot NET. Learn about the fundamental .NET concepts that can turn good programmers into great ones. Discover the secrets behind types and assemblies.Develop a simple language compiler that can emit a .NET executable. In an appendix, get a comprehensive introduction to the C# programming language.

Since this is the first of our books in the .NET market, many Microsoft developers have not had the thrill of owning a Manning book. It's like nothing you have experienced before. We know that great books spring forth from unparalleled support of our most valuable asset: excellent authors. With Manning, you are also buying a community. 


Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Manning Publications; 1 edition (11 Jan 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1930110197
  • ISBN-13: 978-1930110199
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 23.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,994,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Fergal Grimes is a freelance programmer and systems designer. He has 15 years’ experience developing diverse applications for embedded, mainframe, client/server, and Web-based platforms, and is a Microsoft Certified Solution Developer and a Sun Certified Java Developer. He lives in Hollywood, California.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars .NET tour guide. 10 Mar 2002
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This book is very well written, both technically and grammatically (which is something you can't say for all computer books). While it would be next to impossible to cover .NET in it's entirety, this books does an excellent job covering the fundamentals of .NET in a reasonable number of pages:
The CLR - This section is dedicated to the CLR, it's types (there is a descriptive explanation on the difference between value and reference types), System.Object (the base class of every .NET type), deterministic finalization, assemblies (multi-file, private, global and downloadable assemblies are all covered), reflection (dynamically examining a type at runtime), and the basics of intermediate language. At the end, the author builds a very simple compiler to demonstrate how the compilers for .NET translate instructions into intermediate language, which in turn is executed by the CLR at runtime.
ADO.NET - Through many code samples, ADO.NET is given adequate coverage. The DataSet (equivalent to a disconnected ADO Recordset) and DataReader (equivalent to a server side forward-only ADO Recordset) are both covered. Updating a database, both via the DataSetAdapter and directly through Command objects is also covered. This chapter also covers using a DataSet to produce XML and how to serialize (an exciting new topic in .NET) object instances to XML. It would be impossible to cover every aspect of ADO.NET in a single chapter, but this chapter does provide enough information to get acquainted with your available data access options. The MSDN documentation included with the .NET framework or VS.NET should be your next step in figuring out what each property and method does. If you have used ADO in the past, because they share similar interfaces, ADO.NET shouldn't seem that foreign to you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice book for someone who work in Java 19 Sep 2008
Format:Paperback
.NET for Programmers - Fergal Grimes/ Manning

I have spent my last 10 years in the Java world, mostly J2EE.

I thought that now reading a book about .NET will give me a strange feeling.

And indeed, it gives me a strange feeling, but a positive one.

This book is really intended for audience without experience in .NET.

It presents in a clear and simple way the majority of concepts for this technology:

Windows Forms, Web Forms, Remoting, Web Services, COM, MSMQ, ASP.NET and so on.

The book is well structured and it's nice to see a native, clear progress from a topic to another.

Naturally starts with an introduction to .NET, than explains the types and assemblies, and after this, taking a clear example (a poker game) the author presents all these technologies applied to this example: COM based, than ADO.NET and DB connectivity, how to serialize using XML, how to build a DLL, how to introduce a remote service, what about a message queue using MSMQ, how to integrate in IIS.

Ok, now the application is done. But what about web services? How can you introduce SOAP? Do you think that UDDI is too complicated? No way, you will read clear examples of how to use all these core concepts.
Now that we understand the background let's learn about frontend. So let's create a Windows Form based interface. It's nice, but what about a Web Form interface? An entire chapter is dedicated to web forms, so you will benefit a lot from Asp.NET and all the controls there.

Sorry to inform you only now that if you do not know already C# you should start reading the book with the Appendix. This one presents a nice introduction to C#.

For me, a Java addicted, it was a real pleasure to read it.
If you are a Java fan too, after you will read this book you will definitely be more interested in .NET.

Ionel Condor, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars  29 reviews
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars .NET tour guide. 26 Jan 2002
By Eric - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is very well written, both technically and grammatically (which is something you can't say for all computer books). While it would be next to impossible to cover .NET in it's entirety, this books does an excellent job covering the fundamentals of .NET in a reasonable number of pages:
The CLR - This section is dedicated to the CLR, it's types (there is a descriptive explanation on the difference between value and reference types), System.Object (the base class of every .NET type), deterministic finalization, assemblies (multi-file, private, global and downloadable assemblies are all covered), reflection (dynamically examining a type at runtime), and the basics of intermediate language. At the end, the author builds a very simple compiler to demonstrate how the compilers for .NET translate instructions into intermediate language, which in turn is executed by the CLR at runtime.
ADO.NET - Through many code samples, ADO.NET is given adequate coverage. The DataSet (equivalent to a disconnected ADO Recordset) and DataReader (equivalent to a server side forward-only ADO Recordset) are both covered. Updating a database, both via the DataSetAdapter and directly through Command objects is also covered. This chapter also covers using a DataSet to produce XML and how to serialize (an exciting new topic in .NET) object instances to XML. It would be impossible to cover every aspect of ADO.NET in a single chapter, but this chapter does provide enough information to get acquainted with your available data access options. The MSDN documentation included with the .NET framework or VS.NET should be your next step in figuring out what each property and method does. If you have used ADO in the past, because they share similar interfaces, ADO.NET shouldn't seem that foreign to you.
Remoting - This was my favorite chapter. Remoting in .NET is the means for communication between assemblies, processes and remote computers. It's the replacement for DCOM, and because it is able to work using HTTP, it's finally able to work over corporate firewalls without too much hassle. There are a ton of code samples and diagrams to help understand nearly every aspect of Remoting: the available options (Client Activated, SingleCall, and Singleton), configuration, leasing and handling remote events. If your interested about Remoting, it would be in your best interest to code up the samples in this chapter and run them to see what is actually happening with each different option (Client Activate, SingleCall and Singleton) and configuration setting (leasing, channel type, events, etc...).
Web Services - Web Services are a new option in .NET. The closest comparison from days of old (feels kind of funny saying that) would be XML over HTTP or Soap. I never used the VB Soap toolkit, so I can't comment on it, but I've found Web Services in .NET extremely easy to use. The basics of creating a Web Service are covered, as are more advanced topics such as WSDL, Discovery and UDDI. The chapter also covers writing clients to communicate with the Web Services and how to manage session state between Web Service calls.
ASP.NET - The coverage of ASP.NET will be most beneficial to someone who has done web programming before, because it assumes a certain level of core competencies. Those who have used ASP in the past will have the easiest time learning ASP.NET from the material covered here. To show how things have changed, the author starts out with a dynamic page written in ASP and ports it to ASP.NET outlining the steps taken. Your also treated to instructions on how to create custom HTTP handlers and modules (similar to an ISAPI extensions and filters), which I found to be interesting. Finally, coverage is given to creating ASP.NET pages in the VS.NET IDE.
Windows Forms - Windows Forms allows you to create rich Win32 client applications in .NET. This section starts of with the basics: forms, controls, and event handling and then shows in-depth how to build an example application. At the end of the chapter, you are shown how to use the VS.NET IDE to make building Windows Forms applications quicker and easier.
Other - Other topics covered, but not in as much detail as those topics outlined above, include: Windows NT/2000 event logging, COM Interop, MSMQ, Windows Services, XSL transformations and using the new mobile controls in ASP.NET.
There are a large number of code samples, ranging from simple proof of concept exercises to multiple class case studies. The code samples go hand in hand with the presented explanations and topic discussions located in each chapter. For best results, I'd recommend keying them in, compiling, and testing them out.
If you're an intermediate/advanced C++, Java or Visual Basic programmer, who hasn't yet made the journey to .NET, this book is the tour guide you need. In a clear and concise manner it presents what is possible in the new world of .NET, what you need to be effective with the new tools and technologies, and a generous helping of useful code examples to get you started.
It should be noted that the book samples are written in C#. For those new to C# (which should be just about everyone) an included appendix is required reading. That said, the rest of the book, while written in C#, mainly covers the fundamentals of .NET and the Framework Class Libraries which for most part are language agnostic.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well-written with a great, pracitcal example 9 Mar 2002
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
OVERALL ASSESSMENT
This book is aptly named. Not for the beginner, but for the experienced programmer seeking a deeper understanding of .NET development and practical examples of distributed computing, I found this book to be very helpful, very succinct, and very entertaining. Contrary to some of the other titles on the market, Grimes doesn't try to pad the book with 28 chapters, the first 20 of them being the obligatory content explaining the role and function of .NET, what XML, SOAP, and UDDI are, and a primer in coding, and only briefly getting into the core purpose of the book. It gets right into the tough stuff. Grimes instead gives a higher-level viewpoint of programming with .NET, explaining advanced concepts like .NET's garbage collection methodology, memory management, and applications architecture planning, from a best-practices approach.
Grimes bases his book's existence on an example that spans the entire text - building a poker game app. Throughout the text, Grimes constructs and expands upon a concept that is simple enough to be relative to everyone yet complex to be an effective lesson in distributed app design. He abstracts this app out to 11 different versions all calling the same app, including a Windows version, a Web-based version, a message queue, a console version accessible through UNIX telnet commands, a mobile version and an XML Web service, which is a great lesson in showing the ease with which .NET developers may create powerful distributed applications.
It's beautifully written, well-proofread, and quite comprehensive for only 288 pages (not counting the excellent appendices dealing with an Introduction to C#, and detailed source code for the examples). It's a great addition to the reference library of the advanced programmer, or the intermediate developer looking to take their game to the next level.
In short, it's a very disciplined, structured approach to working with .NET.
WHAT I DO LIKE
- The use of graphics is excellent - easy to follow and nicely arranged.
Well documented advanced .NET concepts such as the object-oriented use of delegates, serialization techniques through XML, and separation of code and content in ASP.NET will be appreciated by the experienced developer.
- The use of the poker game app as a case study was very entertaining and very educational. Unlike other books that try to give case studies focusing on the development of applications from varying industries (i.e., a news center publishing application, a site's statistics tracker, a classroom monitoring app for educators), which tends to disenfranchise many developers not familiar with the precise working conditions of the specific industry, Grimes' poker example is something relevant to 9 out of 10 readers, and fun!
- The app is simplistic enough to show some of the more fundamental necessities, yet complex in its design, dealing with a wide range of probabilities. And you'll enjoy playing it almost as much as you will building it.
- The option to have the text as an eBook is great (and cheaper) for people who prefer to spend even more time on their computers than they already do....This book would be nearly perfect if it appealed to Visual Basic.NET programmers, which it sadly doesn't. The exclusive use of C# as the book's programming language ...Merely translating over the code to VB.NET isn't easy, as the book uses some of the more advanced OOP principles.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Presentation of Major .NET Features and Fun, Too 1 May 2002
By H. Hayes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
With the release of Microsoft's .NET platform, many developers are just starting to dig into the massively rich offering of classes, tools, program types, and capabilities that are available. This can surely be a daunting task for the average (and even above average) Visual Basic or ASP developer.
In his book "Microsoft .NET for Programmers", by Manning, Fergal Grimes tackles the job of presenting many of the major features available in .NET through a most enjoyable and ingenious approach. The author uses a case study of implementing "video poker" in many different guises to give the reader an understanding of the different .NET programming types. The book proceeds from development of the core poker engine, employing object-oriented programming techniques and design patterns which are tested from a console interface, to the development of more distributed applications involving databases, remoting, messaging, Windows client interface, web-based client interface, and web services versions.
The use of C# should not deter VB programmers from reading this book. The discussion of fundamental concepts are well written, and the code is understandable without being overly complex or obtuse. The ASP.NET, Web Services, and Remoting sections are well-worth a look. Above all, Grimes has taken a massive subject and reduced it to a fun series of programs that is more than just an introduction to .NET.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for the intermediate to advanced programmer 4 April 2002
By Erin Welker - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Stellar book, but not for the faint of heart! This book is targeted for the intermediate or seasoned programmer and provides a fast track for transitioning to .NET. Fergal chose a simplistic, yet appropriate, sample application (poker) that he builds throughout the book. Code samples are plentiful. A good balance of theory and code provides a concise overview of key concepts of .NET. Be sure to note that all of the book's code samples are all written in C#. This was not apparent to me when I first obtained the book, though the advertising of this fact is not hidden. The author promises that a VB.NET version of the book is in progress. He also provides a quick, 30-page overview of C# in the appendix so that an experienced programmer can quickly come up to speed on the language.
The book covers simplistic and advanced .NET topics, including assemblies, ADO.NET, remote services, XML web services and web forms. It even addresses programming in IL!
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book to pick up .Net (quick and painless). 18 Feb 2002
By James Lin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I have a bookshelf full of programming books, and this is the first time I'm motivated to post a positive review online about a book.
The author did a great job guiding readers through .Net technology with clear explanations leaving no assumptions about readers' skill levels. I loved the way the author planned the fun poker example which utilizes all of .Net's main features (database access, xml, remoting, message queue, web, etc).
After you are done with the book, you will also know better to stay away from video poker machines at casinos.
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