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Metropolis [Reconstructed & Restored] (Masters of Cinema) Limited Edition Dual Format Steelbook [Blu-ray & DVD] [1927]

Alfred Abel , Gustav Fröhlich , Fritz Lang    Parental Guidance   Blu-ray
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Actors: Alfred Abel, Gustav Fröhlich, Brigitte Helm
  • Directors: Fritz Lang
  • Format: DVD+Blu-ray
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Eureka Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 22 Nov 2010
  • Run Time: 150 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0041SMF5A
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 49,972 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

From Amazon.co.uk

If you think you know Fritz Lang's Metropolis backwards, this special edition will come as a revelation. Shortly after its premiere, the expensive epic--originally well over two hours--was pulled from distribution and re-edited against Lang's wishes, and this truncated, simplified form is what we have known ever since 1926. Though not quite as fully restored as the strapline claims, this 118-minute version is the closest we are likely to get to Lang's original vision, complete with tactful linking titles to fill in the scenes that are irretrievably missing. Not only does this version add many scenes unseen for decades, but it restores their order in the original version.

Until now, Metropolis has usually been rated as a spectacular but simplistic science fiction film, but this version reveals that the futuristic setting is not so much prophetic as mythical, with elements of 1920s architecture, industry, design and politics mingled with the mediaeval and the Biblical to produce images of striking strangeness: a futuristic robot burned at the stake, a steel-handed mad scientist who is also a 15th Century alchemist, the trudging workers of a vast factory plodding into the jaws of a machine that is also the ancient God Moloch. Gustav Frohlich's performance as the hero who represents the heart is still wildly overdone, but Rudolf Klein-Rogge's engineer Rotwang, Alfred Abel's Master of Metropolis and, especially, Brigitte Helm in the dual role of saintly saviour and metal femme fatale are astonishing. By restoring a great deal of story delving into the mixed motivations of the characters, the wild plot now makes more sense, and we can see that it is as much a twisted family drama as epic of repression, revolution and reconciliation. A masterpiece, and an essential purchase.

On the DVD: Metropolis has been saddled with all manner of scores over the years, ranging from jazz through electronica to prog-rock, but here it is sensibly accompanied by the orchestral music Gottfried Huppertz wrote for it in the first place. An enormous amount of work has been done with damaged or incomplete elements to spruce the image up digitally, and so even the scenes that were in the film all along shine with a wealth of new detail and afford a far greater appreciation for the brilliance of art direction, special effects and Helm's clockwork sexbomb.

A commentary written but not delivered by historian Ennio Patalas covers the symbolism of the film and annotates its images, but the production information is left to a measured but unchallenging 45-minute documentary on the second disc (little is made of the astounding parallel between the screen story in which Klein-Rogge's character tries to destroy the city because the Master stole his wife and the fact that Lang married the actor's wife Thea von Harbou, authoress of the Metropolis novel and screenplay!). There are galleries of production photographs and sketches; biographies of all the principals; and an illustrated lecture on the restoration process which uses before and after clips to reveal just how huge a task has been accomplished in this important work. --Kim Newman

Product Description

With its dizzying depiction of a futuristic cityscape and alluring female robot, Metropolis is among the most famous of all German films and the mother of sci-fi cinema (an influence on Blade Runner and Star Wars, among countless other films). Directed by the legendary Fritz Lang (M, Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse,The Big Heat, etc.), its jaw-dropping production values, iconic imagery, and modernist grandeur it was described by Luis Buñuel as 'a captivating symphony of movement' remain as powerful as ever.

Drawing on and defining classic sci-fi themes, Metropolis depicts a dystopian future in which society is thoroughly divided in two: while anonymous workers conduct their endless drudgery below ground their rulers enjoy a decadent life of leisure and luxury. When Freder (Gustav Fröhlich) ventures into the depths in search of the beautiful Maria (Brigitte Helm in her debut role), plans of rebellion are revealed and a Maria-replica robot is programmed by mad inventor Rotwang (Rudolf Klein-Rogge) and master of Metropolis Joh Fredersen (Alfred Abel) to incite the workers into a self-destructive riot.

A'Holy Grail' among film finds, Metropolis is presented here in a newly reconstructed and restored version, as lavish and spectacular as ever thanks to the painstaking archival work of the Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung and the discovery of 25 minutes of footage previously thought lost to the world. Lang's enduring epic can finally be seen for the first time in 83 years as the director originally intended, and as seen by German cinema-goers in 1927.

SPECIAL FEATURES:
150-minute reconstructed and restored 2010 version (including 25 minutes of footage previously thought lost to the world)
- Wraparound embossed sleeve
- Pristine new HD transfer (1080p on Blu-ray)
- New 2010 symphony orchestra studio recording of the original 1927 Gottfried Huppertz score in 5.1
- Newly translated optional English subtitles as well as the original German intertitles
- Full-length audio commentary by David Kalat and Jonathan Rosenbaum
- Die Reise nach Metropolis (2010, 53 minutes), a documentary about the film
- 2010 re-release trailer
- 56-page booklet featuring archival interviews with Fritz Lang, a 1927 review by Luis Buñuel, articles by Jonathan Rosenbaum and Karen Naundorf, and restoration notes by Martin Koerber.
and more!


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
98 of 99 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Metropolis, 2010 - A Classic Rediscovered 11 Sep 2010
By M
Format:Blu-ray
I recently saw this newly restored version of Metropolis at Chichester Film Festival (in a Blue Ray presentation) and cannot recommend it highly enough - whether you know this film or not it should be seen. The inclusion of the previously missing 25 minutes (easily noticed due to the poor state of the source material) makes an enormous difference to the film, significantly changing the story line and the overall feel of the film. The poor quality of the inserted film does not diminish its importance and effect (ranging from a few seconds here and there, to whole scenes) but combines to effectively make a new film - or more accurately the resurrection of a lost one (the original 1927 premiered cut). Of course this version does not affect the obvious faults of the film but certainly makes for a more satisfying experience - it completes (apart from about 4 minutes apparently) and confirms the place this film has in the history of cinema. Whether you are interested in silent movies (then I'd highly recommend PiccadillyPiccadilly [1929] [DVD]), the development of cinema (then you should also see Fritz Lang's MM [Masters of Cinema] [Blu-ray] [1931]), special effects (and what incredible effects!) or the history of science fiction on film, this version must be seen.
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62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb restoration of Lang Masterpiece 12 April 2006
By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:DVD
Metropolis as originally conceived by Fritz Lang only survived a short premiere run at one Berlin cinema after which it was withdrawn and the negative sent for re-editing to Paramount the Holly wood associates of the German UFA company.

Paramount considered Metropolis incomprehensible and created a new simplified plot line discarding twenty five percent of the film, and for over fifty years this was the only version available. The vast majority of the missing material is now considered lost forever.

However as a result of research in the 1990s it was possible to definitively reconstruct the plot and the current restoration incorporating all the available material was undertaken. The missing sections of the film are narrated by means of the original captions for the missing sections and additional notes. In addition there is an excellent commentary filling in the gaps.

So at last we can see Lang's original 1927 vision of a horrific future with a favoured elite living on the surface of the earth enjoying a life of luxury, and a vast army of nameless workers living in a grim underground city toiling ten hour shifts.

Freder (Gustav Frolich) son of the ruler of Metropolis and one of the favoured elite investigates the plight of the workers and is so horrified decides to do something about it, and falls in love with Maria (Brigitte Helm) who gives a stunning performance in her first film role. Maria is a leader of the workers seeking justice for them by mediation and sees Freder as the mediator. A major sub plot is the enmity between the ruler (Alfred Abel) and Rotwang (Rudolph Klein-Rogge) who is attempting to create a mechanical version of the dead woman they both loved.
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sci-Fi? It All Starts Here. 19 Nov 2010
By Brady Orme VINE VOICE
Format:Blu-ray
Don't take the title literally, of course cinematic Sci-Fi existed before Fritz Lang filmed METROPOLIS... However, for most people the Sci-Fi we enjoy today have this film as their Primer so basically yes, this is where it all began. Having been a fan of the film for years I was lucky enough to receive my limited-edition Steelbook early from Eureka! themselves, so I can report exactly how this film looks in 1080p, and the extras it contains.

Firstly, it's a print that is comprised of many different sources so don't expect a pristine experience from start to finish... the original METROPOLIS that premiered in Germany was 40 minutes longer than the version most commonly seen (I'm going to forget Giorgio Moroder's synth-pop mutation ever existed, thanks), which was butchered and truncated after bombing at the box-office. Thanks to a recent discovery of an almost-complete print in Buenos Aires F.W. Murnau-Stiftung in Munich was able to take the extra footage from this print, splice it in to the familiar version and presto... Cinema History back where it belongs. It must be remembered however, that the Buenos Aires print was in exceptionally poor condition and it shows when these frames are shown, and a scene detailing Maria's escape from Rotwang is still absent and is simply narrated via text... But so what? The film is 83 years old and it's a privilege to see it again, especially if we remember that we may have never gotten the chance to see it.

Extras-wise, I found the extras on the Blu-Ray slightly lacking from MOCs usual banquet, comprising of a commentary, trailer and German documentary on history of the film and it's restoration. This could be due to the size of the high-definition movie file however.
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258 of 270 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazon.confused 4 Nov 2010
Format:Blu-ray
How do you get a balanced review of a new release when Amazon bundle old reviews of the DVD version (as old as 2001 !!!) with the new ones. CHUMPS. Get your act together Amazon this is a frequent fault.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Look! These are your brothers!" 17 Dec 2010
By @GeekZilla9000 TOP 100 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Blu-ray
Some films have a cultural impact evident by their influence on cinema for generations after their release. This is most obvious in the Science Fiction genre, and you immediately think of 1950s classics such as 'The Day The Earth Stood Still' and '20,000 Leagues Under The Sea' (without which there'd be no Godzilla!). But this silent film from the 1920s had a vision which seemed beyond the boundaries of cinema at the time, and yet it managed to capture an epic sci-fi dystopia with a quality of special effects which films even 60 or 70 years later failed to reproduce.

The film opens to a grim scene of workers walking in depressing unison to begin their shift deep underground. Expressionless, fatigued, and with no display of individuality, the drones look more like prisoners than citizens - and perhaps they are. The slow music captures the sense of their despair but the tempo quickly changes when we see the upper levels of the city. There, fit young men laugh as they play sports in the Eternal Gardens while the ladies dance in their finest wears and volunteer to 'entertain' Master Freder, the son of the city founder.

Fountainside frolics are briefly interrupted when an undergrounder flings open the doors to show the less privileged children their more affluent 'brothers'. It's a scene which manages to portray the unfairness of the two-tiered society and highlights the growing disquiet which exists among those less fortunate. The gate-crashing Maria makes an impression on the young Master Freder, whether it's her spirit or understated beauty, he finds her occupying his thoughts and he goes in search of her.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars METROPOLIS SHOULD ONLY BE SEEN IN THE CLASSROOM
THIS FILM IS FOR PRETENTIOUS FILM BUFFS, WHO LOVE THE SMELL OF THEIR OWN FARTS, LETS FACE IT THIS FILM IS A HEAD ACHE AT BEST, WITH TERRIBLE MUSIC, AND A BAD PICTURE TO BOOT. Read more
Published 2 days ago by Kathleen Daly
5.0 out of 5 stars The large vision of 'Metropolis'
Of its kind - silent and exploring new perspectives on the world along with age-old problems of exploitation and greed - 'Metropolis' is outstanding. Read more
Published 7 days ago by Petronella
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome. My new favourite movie.
Amazing design work. Iconic imagery. Beautiful and sinister "machine man" Is this really from 1927? Makes me realise how movies have not lived up to their potential. Read more
Published 12 days ago by M P Hall
5.0 out of 5 stars Together again!
It's good to be able to see this lost footage, for it adds detail, clarity and beauty to story. What a cool movie this is, now even better!
Published 18 days ago by Robert Randle
5.0 out of 5 stars A 'must see' copy of this classic
Prompt, undamaged delivery this copy of Metropolis is described as 'Masters of Cinema'. Heavily edited shortly after it's release almost all of the lost footage has been included... Read more
Published 1 month ago by A. F. Halligey
5.0 out of 5 stars "Metropolis (Complete)" on BLU RAY - Compatibility Issues With The...
You’ve probably noticed that most of the reviews for Lang's extraordinary “Metropolis" are for the restored ‘DVD’. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Mark Barry
5.0 out of 5 stars Metropolis
This was bought to replace a VHS that had been played to death. An excellent 1926 Fritz Lang silent movie modernised with music by Giorgio Moroder
Published 1 month ago by Peter Brookman
4.0 out of 5 stars Metropolis, but not as we now know it!
Great very 1980's take on an absolute classic movie. Beautifully tinted and quite dramatic with the Moroder music (although this does date it more than the film itself). Read more
Published 1 month ago by J. Gambold
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Edition, Exceptional Extras
Great Edition, Exceptional Extras.
Really a good edition for a collector and movie lover.
I really recommend, since this movie is really a mark on Movie history
Published 1 month ago by Pedro José Pato dos Santos
5.0 out of 5 stars If you love Film history
Lovers of Film and Film History should watch this movie, iconic in many ways and influencing many films decades later.
Published 2 months ago by Kim J
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