• RRP: £23.11
  • You Save: £0.68 (3%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Metamagical Themas: Quest... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Light shelf wear and minimal interior marks. A tradition of quality and service.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern Paperback – 15 Mar 1996

10 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£22.43
£21.58 £4.06
£22.43 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern + Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid
Price For Both: £41.42

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 880 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; New edition edition (15 Mar. 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465045669
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465045662
  • Product Dimensions: 21.7 x 17.1 x 4.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 344,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Douglas R. Hofstadter directs the Center for Research on Concepts and Cognition at Indiana University, and is the College of Arts and Sciences professor of cognitive science and computer science. He is the author of several highly regarded books, including "Godel, Escher, Bach" and "Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies."

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
First Sentence
I never expected to be writing a column for Scientific American. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Bibliomaniac on 1 Dec. 2002
Format: Paperback
I've owned this book for years, and every time I return to it I still find something fresh to think about. It's crammed with ideas both playful and serious, all woven around the general theme of "what is mind, what is consciousness?" No-one will love every single chapter, and the ones I find dull might be the ones you love most, but you'll find something to ponder and play with on every page. Whether you start by designing your own alphabet or fooling around with recursion and self-reference, you'll be stimulated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 April 1998
Format: Paperback
Having been turned onto this amazing author by 'GEB', I approached it with some caution. GEB was like going to the cinema to see Arnie Schwartzenegger and wandering into a complex foriegn language movie without subtitles instead. Fascinating and deep. Metamagical themas is more accesible and fun, containing a series of short articles on a vast array of subjects. I have long regretted the fact that the 'renaissance man' cannot exist anymore, there is too much to know. After reading this book, DH comes close.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Jun. 1999
Format: Paperback
In this collection of articles from his days as a regular with "Scientific American," Hoftstadter covers everything from self-referential statements (like this one), the Rubik's Cube, nuclear proliferation, the prisoner's dilemma, sexist language, fonts, and more.
Surprisingly, most of these topics become intertwined throughout the work (in fact, one of Hofstadter's goals). It's amazing as he runs the gamut, and you see the connections being built!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Nov. 1996
Format: Paperback
In true Hofstaderian form, this book is a fascinating
journey through the world of self-reference. By combining
topics from science, literature, and the arts, the author
draws his readers through an intricate maze of subtle
humour and startling insights. One cannot help looking at
the world through new eyes after reading this masterpiece.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
When Hofstadter took over Scientific American's "Mathematical Games" column, he not only rearranged the letters of its title but used it to write about anything that attracted his polymathic attention.

Described on the cover as "An Interlocked Collection of Literary, Scientific and Artistic Studies", this book combines those columns with reflective essays that provide follow-up material and bring out the links between all the different subjects. So despite the fact that this book is a compilation covering the music of Chopin, the self-replication of DNA, typeface design and the LISP programming language (amongst many other topics), it feels very integrated.

Links are drawn in the most imaginative and unexpected ways- obvious to a genius like Hofstadter, and which gradually become obvious to the reader thanks to the author's talent for straightforward, enthusiastic explanation. Quantum theory is shown as having a deep connection to Rubik's Cube; game theory to nuclear weapons, sexism to translation.

If there is a single theme (or "thema") connecting the mass of science and art in this book, it is the question of the nature of creativity. Hofstadter's argument is that creativity and insight are in principle mechanisable, but that the attempts so far have underestimated the complexity of the problem by many orders of magnitude. It is from his search for examples of creativity in domains such as nonsense poetry, the design of games and of typefaces and in the workings of DNA that the author can speak with authority on what creativity is.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback