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Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary (Merriam Webster's Collegiate Dictionary) Hardcover – Jul 1993


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 1557 pages
  • Publisher: Merriam Webster,U.S.; 10th Revised edition edition (July 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877797099
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877797098
  • Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 18.8 x 4.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,436,269 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Synopsis

Features concise definitions, clear pronunciations, illustrations, tables, cross-references, examples of contemporary word use, synonyms, and more.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 April 1999
Format: Hardcover
After two years in college and three dictionaries, I have finally found the dictionary that was made for my needs. Like most people, I thought that any college "Webster" dictionary would suffice until I had to research my first term paper on marriage customs in the middle ages. Every word that arose in my readings that I needed to look up was hardly ever found in my other "Webster" dictionaries or their explaination was inconclusive and the form was incondite. I am so happy to finally have a dictionary that works! Thanks so much!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 13 Nov. 1998
Format: Hardcover
In it's promotional materials, Merriam-Webster takes pride in its large scholarly editorial staff, and huge citation files. In fact, it is a company devoted to producing high quality scholarly references, and its pride is justified.
Because no dictionary can include everything, the art of producing a fine dictionary is the art of choosing wisely, what to include and what not to incorporate. Some desk dictionaries are too concerned with inflating their word stock with esoteric chemical names and proper nouns, leaving little room for the true lexical entries you are more likely to investigate. Some of these books only give a few near-synonyms to define a word. Others fill valuable space with thumb nail photos, which are fine if you want a picture book.
Merriam-Webster's 10th Collegiate chooses its word stock with care. It uses font sizes and page space judiciously and therefore offers more of the information one is likely to want. It provides carefully crafted definitions, based on citational research that reveals the subtlety of connotation as well as the more obvious denoted sense.
M-W's illustrative phrases are excellent, with many cited from literature. The word stock is extensive as well as current. The synonym studies are truly useful, revealing the fine shades of difference between the synonyms listed. The usage notes are based on citational evidence, not on the opinion of elitist "usage panels". When a word's usage is at issue, this dictionary gives you the facts, not opinion. It's dating of the first known appearance of words is perhaps not essential, but it is a welcome feature lending historical interest to the entries.
I have only one complaint about this otherwise exemplary dictionary.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Mar. 1998
Format: Hardcover
How's this for a clever idea: Take 160,000 or so of the most commonly used words in the English language, put them in alphabetical order, tell how they're pronounced, define them, explain where they came from, throw in more than 700 illustrations to make their meanings even clearer, and then publish the whole conglomeration (n., a mixed coherent mass) in a single volume for under $25. Sounds impossible, but it's been done and done well by the same amazing folks who gave us Webster's Third New International Dictionary. Granted, this masterful work of reference lacks the intricate plotting and elaborate character development found in, say, Moby Dick or War and Peace, but the vocabulary is more varied, the words are arranged in alphabetical order for your reading convenience, and you can open up to any page at random and know that you'll learn something new and exciting about our native tongue. Why, with sufficient motivation, you could even take a few thousand of these words and write a great novel of your own! And don't tell me you already have a dictionary that's proved perfectly serviceable since the Nixon administration: There are thousands of words here that didn't even exist back when my worn-out copy of Webster's Seventh Collegiate first came out. Unlike old friends, old dictionaries have no way of keeping pace with the changing times. The English language keeps on evolving, and you just have to spring for a new dictionary once every decade or so if you want to keep up. And so it is that I bid adios and a fond farewell to my faithful old Seventh Edition and extend a heartfelt welcome to my beautiful new and enthusiastically recommended friend, Merriam-Webster's Tenth.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 July 1998
Format: Hardcover
The MW Tenth is the latest in my nearly complete collection of this company's series of dictionaries. I began with the Fifth and bought each as they were published This current edition (Tenth) has increased the size and scope of desk dictionaries -- it is much larger than many previous editions (the Eighth and Ninth are of similar size) and contains such a wealth of information that almost no one would outgrow it. I find the Tenth useful not only in itself, but in the context of its predecessors. Words change their meaning over time and a new dictionary is essential to knowing exactly where a word is at this time -- as well as using previous editions to see where it came from. I am proud to have contributed a word to the Ninth edition, still listed in the Tenth: "hizzoner." It took years of research, but how many people get their own entry in a major dictionary? The MW Tenth is a great book for just browsing and (not incidentally)learning just when a word entered the language. More "family reading" of dictionaries such as this might help young children enjoy their language.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 74 reviews
95 of 96 people found the following review helpful
The original Webster's is still the best one! 13 July 2000
By TestMagic Inc. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Noah Webster wrote the first American English dictionary in the 1806 and his name has come to be synonymous with the word "dictionary" in the US. As a result, every dictionary in the US that wants to make any sales calls itself a "Webster's."
The M-W, however, is the original and still the best. I have every major American English dictionary in publication, and several British dictionaries, including the Random House, the Webster's 3rd (the unabridged dictionary), Microsoft's dictionary, the Oxford Dictionary, and several learner's dictionaries.
Frankly, the differences among the top three,i.e., the M-W, the Random House, and the Microsoft (on CD), are not that great--choose a word like "efficiency" and see how each is defined. You might think they were all working together. That said, I have so say the M-W is still my favorite. Further, the M-W dictionary is consistently rated #1 in surveys of academics and language scholar.
I am a professional language and test preparation instructor and rely on good dictionaries for precise definitions of words. The M-W consistently gives clear, accurate dictionaries and apposite examples. One extra feature that helps word lovers like me understand the words better is that M-W lists definitions in the order that they came into use, with the most recent usage last. This type of listing is extremely helpful for understanding how a word has evolved and what it is about that word that remains and what is not essential to the meaning. Such an understanding of words is essential for GRE and SAT preparation and is one of the main reasons I regularly turn to the M-W.
In short, it's your best option for an American English dictionary.
88 of 90 people found the following review helpful
An exemplary lexical reference -- for the most part. 13 Nov. 1998
By "ram_crammer" - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In it's promotional materials, Merriam-Webster takes pride in its large scholarly editorial staff, and huge citation files. In fact, it is a company devoted to producing high quality scholarly references, and its pride is justified.
Because no dictionary can include everything, the art of producing a fine dictionary is the art of choosing wisely, what to include and what not to incorporate. Some desk dictionaries are too concerned with inflating their word stock with esoteric chemical names and proper nouns, leaving little room for the true lexical entries you are more likely to investigate. Some of these books only give a few near-synonyms to define a word. Others fill valuable space with thumb nail photos, which are fine if you want a picture book.
Merriam-Webster's 10th Collegiate chooses its word stock with care. It uses font sizes and page space judiciously and therefore offers more of the information one is likely to want. It provides carefully crafted definitions, based on citational research that reveals the subtlety of connotation as well as the more obvious denoted sense.
M-W's illustrative phrases are excellent, with many cited from literature. The word stock is extensive as well as current. The synonym studies are truly useful, revealing the fine shades of difference between the synonyms listed. The usage notes are based on citational evidence, not on the opinion of elitist "usage panels". When a word's usage is at issue, this dictionary gives you the facts, not opinion. It's dating of the first known appearance of words is perhaps not essential, but it is a welcome feature lending historical interest to the entries.
I have only one complaint about this otherwise exemplary dictionary. It's treatment of trademark entries reveals a reluctance to report the actual usage of such terms. Taking the safe approach, it reports for example that 'band-aid' is always to be capitalized, thus: 'Band-Aid', and it defines it only in its most limited sense:
"Band-Aid: trademark--used for a small adhesive strip with a gauze pad for covering minor wounds"...Trademark issues aside, this is the desk dictionary of choice. If you have never owned a Merriam-Webster Collegiate, you will be pleasantly surprised to learn how much better a desk dictionary can be. Use this reference for a year or so, and you will seldom bother with other dictionaries. If you care about the English language and value its mastery, this dictionary will inspire a passion for it.
The standard edition with its bright red dust jacket, is a handsome and rugged volume. This invaluable reference is bound in sturdy boards with a durable linen covering. The thin paper stock results in a thinner volume, yet it contains more substance than the bulky thick competing books.
171 of 182 people found the following review helpful
Thorough and well-written, with useful features 27 Feb. 2000
By Mike Christie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a very high quality collegiate dictionary. I am a member of a word puzzle organization (puzzlers.org) and this is our standard reference, along with the unabridged version, "Webster's Third New International Dictionary". Many very obscure words show up in puzzles, but it is relatively rare I find I have to go to the unabridged dictionary to look them up.
In addition to being thorough (with excellent sections on abbreviations, foreign words and phrases (such as "en plein jour" or "inshallah") it includes compressed but informative etymological data. For example, the entry on "spacious" has this - ME, fr. MF spacieux, fr. L spatiosus, space, room -- more at SPEED (14c)"; in a little over a single line you get the lineage, with a reference to yet more information. You may have to learn some of the abbreviations (Middle English, Middle French, 14th century) but I found them generally intuitive and didn't need to look them up much at all.
In addition, there are excellent usage paragraphs scattered throughout. These are of two types. One type compares the usage of different words with very similar meanings. For example, the entry on "satiate" provides a usage paragraph that compares "satiate", "sate", "surfeit", "cloy", "pall", "glut" and "gorge", identifying the precise differences of usage between them. The paragraph is cross-referenced at each of the other six words, so you don't have to just stumble across satiate to find it.
The other kind of usage paragraph discusses correctness. A good example is "hopefully", which in its sense "I hope that" is controversial. The dictionary asserts the validity of this controversial use, which is sure to annoy some purists, but it does acknowledge the debate and cite grammatical arguments for its position.
The dictionary is available online, and I strongly recommend you take a look at it. There is a CD-ROM for sale too, which is worth getting as it adds some fancy search features, though if you're like me you'll want the paper version to keep by the bed.
34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
The best general purpose dictionary on the market 5 Nov. 2002
By Debbie Lee Wesselmann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
When I recently discovered that the dictionary I owned was out of date (it didn't even have the word "internet" in it!), I set out to find a new one. Because I'm a professional writer, I can't afford to have a substandard or incomplete volume; yet, I didn't want one that was so bulky that I couldn't easily slip it from the bookcase and balance it on my lap. After going to bookstores and browsing through those in stock, I finally settled on the Merriam-Webster's Collegiate. The text is printed on paper thick enough to block out the print on the reverse side, but thin enough to take up minimal room on the shelf. When opened, the pages lie flat without assistance. The comprehensive listings are easy to read and understand for most people over the age of 14. In addition to the usual guide to pronunciation, you'll find sections in the back on biographical and geographical names, abbreviations, foreign words and phrases, signs and symbols, and a "handbook of style." Although much has been made about the added line drawings to supplement the definitions, I find them sparse and only mildly interesting.
I recommend this for high school and college students as well as anyone who owns an older, pre-high tech version. If you are searching for a mid-size, comprehensive dictionary, you've found your book.
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Correction to my previous review 18 Nov. 1999
By Katherine Hoffer (hoffer@uclink4.berkeley.edu) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Previously I rated this dictionary with 4 stars; I now amend it to 5 stars. At the back of the book I found pages and pages of abbreviations (a godsend for use in my work!). I can't think of a better reference. In fact, we have purchased a copy for everyone in our office for instant answers.
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