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Memory (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures) Mass Market Paperback – 7 Oct 1997


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Memory (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures) + Miles in Love (Omnibus Edition) + Miles Errant (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures)
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Baen Books; Reissue edition (7 Oct. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067187845X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671878450
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.5 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 192,287 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Miles returned to consciousness with his eyes still closed. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By K. Newman on 29 Jan. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Following his death in 'Mirror Dance', Miles finds that there are complications to his recovery - complications that lead to near-disaster on a Dendarii mission. Rather than revealing all to Simon Illyan, Miles attempts a cover up. Found out, he is released from military service. The 'little admiral' must now cease to exist.
It is time for Lord Vorkosigan to come into his own, as a crisis develops over the life of Simon Illyan, as Simon's memory chip appears to go into meltdown. Miles is forced to take drastic action, with the aid of the Emperor, action which ultimately leads to his redemption. And finally Lord Vorkosigan gets a little of the respect that is due to him for his service.
Much less action in this book than previously in the series, the main point of interest aside from trying to work out who if anyone is the baddie here, is the internalisation of Mile's struggle to integrate Admiral Naismmith and Lord Vorkosigan into 'Miles'. The battle is internal and at one hilarious point also external. It is something very different from the previous books in the series, and clearly key to the next phase in Miles' life. He really comes into his own here, and the conflict is ultimately resolved peacefully, if not without losses.
A fantastic addition to the series, if a little slower paced and with less external action than usual. It's about time Miles matured - it will be interesting to see where he goes next.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By David Topping on 22 Feb. 2006
Format: Hardcover
In terms of plot and character development Memory is the book which for me best sums up Miles Vorkosigan. Written in the wry and often very amusing style which has become Bujold’s hallmark, ‘Memory’ unfolds at a tremendous pace, starting in one direction and taking an abrupt turn which, if possible, seems even more satisfying than the first. For the almost the first time we see Miles make a mistake, one from which not even his hyperactive imagination can save him. ‘Memory’ brings Miles back to his planet of birth, almost a homecoming, and Bujold brings out new aspects of her characters that we’ve not seen before.
In many ways I felt that Memory marks the point at which Miles Naismith Vorkosigan begins to grow up, we finally find out what the adult Miles’ is like, and satisfying though the younger Miles’ was the adult is even better, this has been well worth the wait. This is possibly the best story she has written, it is difficult to stop reading, even on th 10th re-read!
While technically this is a stand alone volume in the Barrayar series there is so much development done in earlier works that readers won’t get the full benefit without reading those books. That’s just not a problem! Bujold writes real stories, with real characters and plots which are enjoyable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Oct. 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't regret buying this book.
As the latest book that I've read of Miles's adventures, perhaps it is a wee bit flat. Not very exciting overall. BUT I totally love this book as it expands and (conversely) encapsulates the Vorkosigan world approx. 230 odd years since 'Falling Free'. Similar to Asimov's style - for the series portraying the possible future of a (rather) roboticised world - of not making a continuous character the continual central character, Miles Vorkosigan is subsumed in the events surrounding his life, i.e. the intrigue against Illyan, rather than causing chaos (as in the Little Admiral's adventures). Bujold treats Miles as she did Ethan of Athos, as eyes to tell a greater story and yet a character in his own right.
I enjoyed reading the little digressions from the central theme, relating the details of other people in Miles' life, such as his Emperor, and Miles' friends from previous adventures. I also enjoyed the method by which new and interesting characters are introduced into "our" Vorkosigan world. (Analogous to past Pratchett 'Discworld' books, where the most laugh-on-a-bus of the story is a mere footnote.) Wait 'til you meet Zap the cat.
Dare I say that Miles grows up? I believe that 'Memory' is more than a mere sci-fi mystery wi' a bit of psychology thrown in. It is a good story set in an interesting world, populated with believable characters. Miles' personality becomes more complex (as we all should when we grow), and Miles learns to know himself better (as I wish I could), and a sub-theme throughout seems to be "life goes on".
I wouldn't catergorise 'Memory' as puff pastry, but maybe puff savoury (as only Miles' new cook can make it - with perhaps a side dip, or a filling of dairy products after it passes through the cook's domain ). That's the way I see it, that's the way I call it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
Mad Miles continues continues his breathtaking dance along the edge of insanity. His is the most delicate and convincing brush with psychosis since that by the Prince of Denmark. But Miles Vorkosigan is a deeper and more subtly crafted character than Hamlet.
This book sees Miles explore his Barrayarran personality - indeed the author implies that Miles Naismith is dead. That would be a shame, but she certainly proves that she can develop superb plots around Miles Vorkosigan, a character she deepens considerably in this book.
Bujold continues to demonstrate that the supernova brilliance of "Mirror Dance" was not a fluke. Her style has matured since her earliest works, and is more consistent now. She is not as prolific as Asimov, as grounded in Science as Clarke, or as imaginative as Heinlein, but she is a better writer than any other, in this genre or outside it. It is her characterisation that defines her genius. Its like has not been seen for centuries.
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