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A Memory Of Light: Book 14 of the Wheel of Time: 14/14 Hardcover – 8 Jan 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 912 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (8 Jan 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841498726
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841498720
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 5.8 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (509 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 26,102 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

For twenty years The Wheel of Time has enthralled more than forty million readers in over thirty-two languages. A MEMORY OF LIGHT brings this majestic epic series to its richly satisfying conclusion

From the Inside Flap

A MEMORY OF LIGHT

Book Fourteen of THE WHEEL OF TIME®

And it came to pass in those days, as it had come before and would come again, that the Dark lay heavy on the land and weighed down the hearts of men, and the green things failed, and hope died.

From Charal Drianaan te Calamon, The Cycle of the Dragon

In the Field of Merrilor the rulers of the nations gather to join behind Rand al'Thor, or to stop him from his plan to break the seals on the Dark One's prison - which may be a sign of his madness, or the last hope of humankind. Egwene, the Amyrlin Seat, leans toward the former.

In Andor, the Trollocs seize Caemlyn.

In the wolf dream, Perrin Aybara battles Slayer.

Approaching Ebou Dar, Mat Cauthon plans to visit his wife Tuon, now Fortuona, Empress of the Seanchan.

All humanity is in peril - and the outcome will be decided in Shayol Ghul itself. The Wheel is turning and the Age is coming to its end. The Last Battle will determine the fate of the world . . .

For twenty years The Wheel of Time has enthralled more than forty million readers in over thirty-two languages. A Memory of Light brings this majestic fantasy creation to its richly satisfying conclusion.

Working from notes and partials left by Robert Jordan when he died in 2007, and consulting with Jordan's widow, who edited all of Jordan's books, established fantasy writer Brandon Sanderson has recreated the vision Jordan left behind.


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

174 of 187 people found the following review helpful By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Jan 2013
Format: Hardcover
The Wheel of Time is finished. That's a statement that's going to take a while to get used to. The first volume of the series, The Eye of the World, was published in January 1990. George Bush Snr. and Margaret Thatcher were still in power and the Cold War was still ongoing. Fourteen books, four million words, eleven thousand pages and over fifty million sales (in North America alone) later, the conclusion has finally arrived. Can it possibly live up to the expectations built up over that time?

It is a tribute to the plotting powers of Robert Jordan, the writing skill of Brandon Sanderson (who took over the series after Jordan's untimely death in 2007) and the hard work of Jordan's editors and assistants that A Memory of Light is - for the most part - a triumphant finale. Given the weight of expectations resting on the novel, not to mention the unfortunate circumstances under it was written, it is unsurprising that it is not perfect. The novel occasionally misfires, is sometimes abrupt in how it resolves long-running plot strands and sometimes feels inconsistent with what has come before. However, it also brings this juggernaut of an epic fantasy narrative to an ending that makes sense, is suitably massive in scope and resolves the series' thematic, plot and character arcs satisfactorily - for the most part.

It is a familiar viewpoint that The Wheel of Time is a slow-burning series, with Robert Jordan not afraid to have his characters sitting around talking about things for entire chapters (or, in one case, an entire novel) rather than getting on with business.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Judge Tabor on 21 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I am still reeling from disappointment. I thought Brandon Sanderson did a great job on "The Gathering Storm" and "Towers of Midnight" but "A Memory of Light" has left me so disappointed, I don't know how to get it out of my head except to write this dumbo review. Basically, the story didn't have cohesion - there was way too much superfluous stuff going on that didn't have to be included, while primary issues that needed to be developed toward a successful build-up were just left blowing in the wind.

I'm going to list some stuff I hated so don't read if you don't want to see some massive spoilers. These items are not listed in any order.

*Spoilers*

#1 - Lan and Nynaeve had no time together in this book except for a couple of sentences at the very end.

#2 - Perrin spends page after page after page in the dreamworld trying to find Slayer and kill him - boring, boring...

#3 - The 4 great generals who have oversight of the battle are compromised by compulsion via Graendel. After the buildup of these great men, we see Bryne, Bashere, Ituralde and Agelmar being removed from command and sitting useless. Purely disrespectful way to end the careers of these great men.

#4 - The Aiel might just as well have been left out of this book - oh, wait a minute, in my opinion - they were!

#5 - The nation of Shara shows up during the last battle - did we really need one more element added to the already bursting balloon of confusion going on? This one was ridiculous. They were not a well known people. If the author needed some other people to battle besides the boring Trollocs, why not send in the Shaido? But then again, the "good" Aiel might have had to actually have a role to play in the book.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Darren Porter on 10 Jan 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I feel emotionally battered and bruised after finishing A Memory of Light but also satisfied.

After the last 20 years I am used to the enjoyable slow burn of the Wheel of Time novels. The final novel in the series, 'A Memory of Light' is different. It is brutal, an assault on the senses, the action does not relent and you are left in no doubt the 'Last Battle' is here.

The book itself is epic. The battle scenes are intense and are wonderfully written. Characters finish their arcs sometimes in blazes of glory, other times in brutally unexpected ways, and the heroes journeys are ended.

A very minor gripe is that the ending left many subplots open for interpretation which is not normally a bad thing but somewhere deep down I feel that after a 20+ year investment I could have seen a slightly longer epilogue.

As a side note to the publisher I was also slightly frustrated I was unable to get this as an ebook/kindle on release.

A very worthy end to a wonderful series.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lord knows the Wheel of Time series has flaws. All fans know that. Plot missteps, idiosyncratic touches which did not always work. Characterization that did not work for everyone.

Nevertheless, no series - none - has earned its ending volume quite like The Wheel of Time. Epic is a word that is overused, but for this series, it genuinely has to apply. No series earns its sacrfices, its twists, its darker moments, with quite the weight of this series. The scale, the depth, the engagement with characters taking dark, sometimes unpalatable paths, and, yes, the length, all contribute to this. None of its flaws overcome how much impact the journey of the series has had on me, and has truly tested the standard forms of the genre while making them feel real and emotionally satisfying; the role of any good reconstructionist.

Rand al Thor was the Chosen One, and no Chosen One ever suffered so much, transformed so much - even into places which were not pleasant - and actually earned the Chosen One label like he did. His journey was real, tragic and draining, and yet his position as prophesized chosen did not feel cheap, as it so often does, as he plainly was the chosen figure of the world for demonstrable reason, a force on the Pattern as much as the evil they all faced. And with a case of engaging, flawed, heroic, complex and yes, even frustrating, core characters, the series built a world of enviable complexity and idiotic humanity, that drew us in even when it dragged or annoyed. Even the seemingly two dimensional had true depth to them. People changed, grew, devolved and above all lived.

No world ever suffered like the world of the Wheel of Time, or at least not for so long in our memories building for book after book.
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