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Melancholia [DVD]

150 customer reviews

Price: £6.89 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: Kirsten Dunst, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Kiefer Sutherland, Charlotte Rampling, John Hurt
  • Directors: Lars Von Trier
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 23 Jan. 2012
  • Run Time: 136 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (150 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005PWVK7U
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,619 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Justine (Kirsten Dunst) and Michael (Alexander Skarsgård) are celebrating their marriage at a sumptuous party in the home of her sister (Charlotte Gainsbourg) and brother-in-law (Kiefer Sutherland). Meanwhile, the planet, Melancholia, is heading towards Earth... MELANCHOLIA is a psychological disaster movie from director Lars von Trier.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stefan Brenner on 6 Jan. 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Impossible? Well, this is what Lars Von Trier achieves in "Melancholia"; the dogged adherence to social tradition explored by Thomas Vinterberg's drama is successfully blended with Tarkovsky's bleak existential contemplation of annihilation.

The glue that binds is melancholia or loss of purpose. Justine's deteriorating condition is disfunctional only within the regularities of a human sphere. However, as everything is placed under an ever-increasing threat from the approach of a rogue planet, her disconnection from normal social and emotional concerns becomes a strength rather than a weakness and indeed the only rational response to such a disaster. Justine makes one final gesture of reconciliation; she constructs of a "Magic Cave" to reassure her nephew and calm her, by now, hysterical sister. In doing so, she makes up for all the previous pain: when all Earthly life is about to end there is no time left to qualify our relationships.

In her depression, Justine believes the Earth is evil; others would project their fears on to the planet named after the title of the film. In truth, these worlds simply exist, journeying through space until a chance encounter destroys them both ... Von Trier's beautiful film reminds us the event would hold no significance without the value we attach to our relationships, our consciousness of nature in general, and thus to life itself.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BrownPolar on 8 Mar. 2015
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I have followed Lars Von Trier for the last 40 years as one of my top favourite directors, ever since I saw one of his early shorts in the 70’s. Highly admired for being a director of immense creativity, originality and vision, Von Trier is also renowned for his daring in addressing challenging issues and taboo subjects through his prolific work. A filmmaker who never makes a movie which is similar in character to one that he has previously made, he is one of those few artists who have notably and significantly contributed to the expansion of the boundaries of cinema.

‘Melancholia’ is yet another great instance of Von Trier’s ceaseless passion in creating a new movie that surpasses what faithful fans might expect from him. However this time, it is actually quite personal in that the film takes on a subject the director himself is concerned with. Melancholia is a mental condition which appears now to be quite common, particularly amongst those who live in the industrialised parts of the world. Considered as a precursor to more debilitating mental illnesses such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder, the condition may be hereditary, although childhood trauma may also cause it in adults.

I was surprised to learn that Von Trier himself is suffering from clinical depression, form an interview with the director on this DVD. He is not the only famous person who suffers from this life wrecking illness or from its twin, bipolar disorder, but a number of other celebrities like Stephan Fry and Freddie Flintoff. As it is the case with almost all mental illnesses, these conditions are not fully understood by most ordinary people, making them react unfavourably or, in extreme cases, unsympathetically to the often bizarre behaviour of the sufferers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 31 Mar. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
At the end of it all, despite all best endeavours of forever clambering human beings, the silent forces of the universe will eventually roll on in and smother the world. These forces will trundle over all beliefs, creeds, races, life forms and dreams, leaving nothing, not a trace. The universe will continue as if they never existed. Therefore, as the film highlights, what do we do in between - being born and the final destiny is vital.

To describe those characters who inhabit the film - they operate within an invented surrogate world, residing within the secret cave, where the real external world not longer exists, expelled by a force of imagination. This has allowed them to hide away from the over arching reality which blows outside their bubble - a common problem which exists external to the film, which the viewer inhabits. When this show piece is fatally punctured to show the ever hurtling abyss, the human shutters are quickly closed and the conversation about house prices formally resumes.

All external threats are drowned within the tedium of ennui, as the beginning of the film highlights. Reality is swamped within various life costs; sex, money displays, advertising tack, social clambering and other conspicuous forms of consumption to impress the neighbours. For as the director points out, human beings are very unsure of themselves and so need to seek recompense in continuous projections of ill afforded lifestyles otherwise their life lacks meaning. So within the current malaise they embark upon a pretend existence.

Meanwhile, outside of the socially composed bubble, soundless forces rage around the universe, each operates external to this collective human hallucination, grounded upon more primal elements - the origins of the time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Morris TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Jan. 2012
Format: DVD
Melancholia is the story of two sisters; Justine (Kirsten Dunst) & Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg - Antichrist - also by Lars von Trier). The former is celebrating her wedding at Claire & her husband John's (Kiefer Sutherland) magnificent estate. It coincides with one of the biggest celestial events ever; a 'flyby' of a blue planet named "Melancholia" that has been 'hiding' in the blind spot behind the Sun and will now pass closely past earth in the coming days. But Justine, already struggling with depression, begins to feel suffocated by fear, has vivid dreams and a terminal case of foreboding, her warring family & sympathetic husband (Alexander Skarsgård - Straw Dogs 2011) try to placate her but she is certain that Melancholia signals the end and has time to prepare herself whilst others panic.

Melancholia is a difficult film to call, the opening five minutes show the planets moving closer together to an epic orchestral score that pervades the rest of the film in theme and repetition. So we already know the fate of the planets before the film has played out. What is interesting is how Lars von Trier shows us the interactions of the protagonists and how they each deal with the impending doom; some clinging to false-hopes and other accepting their fate and insignificance in the entire scheme of things.

The direction is impeccable, credit to Lars von Trier here, although the incessant flitting through time sometimes makes the narrative difficult to follow.
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