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Megalex [Hardcover]

Alexandro Jodorowsky , Fred Beltran
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

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Book Description

10 April 2012
On the planet-city of Megalex, urban sprawl consumes all, leaving only a few bastions of nature and a mass of drug-addled citizens who are always searching for distractions from their daily drudgery. That all changes when a clone, known only as the Anomaly, is born and rescued from certain destruction... Straight from the untamed minds of Alexandro Jodorowsky (The Incal, The Metabarons) and Fred Beltran (Pin-Up Girls from Around the World) comes an intriguing and highly original Sci-Fi adventure.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Humanoids, Inc. (10 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594651337
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594651335
  • Product Dimensions: 26.7 x 19.6 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 655,522 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Megalex 30 May 2012
By Octo7
Format:Hardcover
The term 'wild imagination' is really an understatement when it comes to Jodorowsky; anyone who's seen his amazing films or read any of his comics will testify to this. So it comes as no surprise that Megalex is loaded with incredible, albeit sometimes baffling ideas that meld together to create a complex and satisfying whole. Those not used to his style may find the super-fast pace and really out-there ideas a bit alarming at first, but with the help of Beltran's beautiful art, it shouldn't take long for you to get accustomed to the wild energy, sexuality and extreme violence contained within the narrative. As usual for Jodorowsky, there is plenty of social commentary in this story, although none of it too heavy-handed or preachy; there's also plenty of spiritual and religious symbolism.

Fred Beltran's artwork is incredible. The book is divided into three chapters, the first two contain Beltran's signature digital artwork, which still looks organic and beautifully detailed, despite not being hand-drawn in the traditional sense. The final chapter is done in a more traditional pen and ink comic style, but it somehow remains consistent with chapter one and two and is too pretty to complain about. Beltran's talent and unique style as an artist is indisputable.

As usual, being a Humanoids book, this hardcover is beautifully bound and printed, and looks great on my shelf. I think Humanoids are probably the best comics publisher around when it comes to pure quality in their physical product, luckily the content nearly always lives up to the classy presentation.

I highly recommend this book to fans of Jodorowsky and comics in general, but not to younger readers as it does contain some extreme violence and plenty of nudity.
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Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Megalex 2 July 2012
By Octo7 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The term 'wild imagination' is really an understatement when it comes to Jodorowsky; anyone who's seen his amazing films or read any of his comics will testify to this. So it comes as no surprise that Megalex is loaded with incredible, albeit sometimes baffling ideas that meld together to create a complex and satisfying whole. Those not used to his style may find the super-fast pace and really out-there ideas a bit alarming at first, but with the help of Beltran's beautiful art, it shouldn't take long for you to get accustomed to the wild energy, sexuality and extreme violence contained within the narrative. As usual for Jodorowsky, there is plenty of social commentary in this story, although none of it too heavy-handed or preachy; there's also plenty of spiritual and religious symbolism.

Fred Beltran's artwork is incredible. The book is divided into three chapters, the first two contain Beltran's signature digital artwork, which still looks organic and beautifully detailed, despite not being hand-drawn in the traditional sense. The final chapter is done in a more traditional pen and ink comic style, but it somehow remains consistent with chapter one and two and is too pretty to complain about. Beltran's talent and unique style as an artist is indisputable.

As usual, being a Humanoids book, this hardcover is beautifully bound and printed, and looks great on my shelf. I think Humanoids are probably the best comics publisher around when it comes to pure quality in their physical product, luckily the content nearly always lives up to the classy presentation.

I highly recommend this book to fans of Jodorowsky and comics in general, but not to younger readers as it does contain some extreme violence and plenty of nudity. Some of the violent scenes are genuinely disturbing, which I find rare in a Jodorowsky comic because he usually depicts violence in an almost celebratory comic-book style. If you like good art, dystopian sci-fi, and really unique characters; then buy this book. Fans of the Incal are in for a real treat, it's the closest thing he's done to that style in years, even more-so than the canonical 'The Metabarons or The Techno Priests' series .
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC BOOK 25 Jan 2013
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Great story, great art work, sex, violence, and more clones than you can shake a diode at. If you're in the mood for an incredibly imaginative science fiction story/philosophical inquiry/spiritual exploration, pick up a copy of Megalex ASAP :)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Digital Painting of Beltran and the Mad Imagination of Jodorowsky -- Add Another Planet to the Jodoverse 24 July 2014
By Corey Lidster - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Megalex takes Jodorowsky fans to a new corner of the Jodoverse, adding territory to the star-chart that includes 'The Incal', 'Before the Incal' and 'Final Incal', 'The Metabarons', 'Weapons of the Metabarons', and 'Metabarons Genesis: Castaka', and 'The Technopriests' -- Jodorowsky's first collaboration with the artist Beltran. His work on 'The Technopriests', however, was as a 'colorist' for the line art of Zoran Janjetov; but 'colorist' doesn't really describe his transformation of Janjetov's pencil and ink illustrations, giving them an almost three-dimensional quality with his fully painted layering -- all of it digital.

On 'Megalex' Beltran is solo, creating the computer-generated paintings he's famous for. As one of the artists who pioneered digital comic art, alongside others like Japanese illustrator and 'Monkey King' writer-painter Katsuya Terada and British Judge Dredd/Killing Joke/DC cover artist Brian Bolland, his restless, experimental nature is typical of many 'early adopters' of art-techn. It is evident here, as the smoothly rendered art of the opening chapters abruptly shifts to more traditional line art and hatching (In a way, the artistic metamorphosis mirrors the story. The flawlessly rendered, smoothly-contoured style depicts the gleaming artifice and sterility of the Orwellian regime, while the classic -- but still computer-generated -- ink drawn pages, with their delicate texturing, represents the shifting focus as the Chem Forest rebels attack).

'Megalex' introduces a sterile world whose surface has been almost entirely covered in the rigidly engineered, technologically advanced, and viciously authoritarian global-city-state for which the book is named. With organic procreation banned, the genetically engineered population is divided into classes, the upper class allowed 400 years of life, while the lowest classes are only given 400 days. When an attack on Megalex distracts the drug addicted officials tasked with ensuring quality control among the clones, weeding out even the slightest genetic anomalies, one of the 400-day police clones emerges as an eight-foot tall giant. He manages to escape with the help of Adama, a buxom clone who is a part of the organic resistance movement, based in the last refuge of the natural world, Chem Forest. The resistance has used altered and manipulated tree roots, sliding down their hollow stalks to access the ancient tunnels, constructed by an eccentric billionaire thousands of meters beneath the plastic and metallic street-grids. They are aided by the various animal species they have managed to rescue from extinction, as well as mysterious space-faring life-forms dubbed Malaks, who look like gigantic, transparent manta-rays. They have the ability to breach the city-defenses and launch devastating attacks, making them essential allies of the rebel cause. The Megalex, controlled by the still-living brain of an otherwise mummified corpse named King Yod, with his evil wife and beautiful daughter, must be destroyed if the rebels wish to save Chem Forest from certain annihilation.

While Megalex doesn't have the epic scale of The Incal, The Metabarons, or The Technopriests, it features the explosion of mad, brilliant concepts that Jodo is known for, as well as the brutal violence and sexuality typical to his bande dessinee creations. On the down side, there is also plenty of the ridiculous dialogue and cheesy humor that Jodo fans have learned to tolerate. In some respects, his silliness is sort of endearing, and perhaps helps to balance the heavier aspects of his story-telling -- the rape, genital mutilation, and dismemberment-torture that make regular appearances in his work; although Megalex doesn't feature any of the above, and is quite tame by Jodorowsky standards.

While Beltran's digitally-painted art doesn't equal the brilliant work done by Moebius, Ladronn, Das Pastoras, or Juan Gimenez, he can hardly be faulted for falling short of what are four of the greatest masterpieces in European comic art. He is still very much a worthy addition to the incredible array of talents that make up Jodorowsky's collaborators. I would like to see him return some time to the world of pencil, ink and paint in which he began (with stunning results), but Megalex is an extraordinary effort on the part of both Beltran and Jodorowsky.
3.0 out of 5 stars A collector's purchase 4 Jan 2014
By Andrew - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I ordered this book after having read The Incal, Before the Incal, and The Metabarons, while having Technopriests waiting to be read. The art, while a bit grotesque, is very well done. There are a multitude of interesting concepts to explore while reading this book. There is no shortage of perceived inspiration on Jodorowsky's part, however the translated dialogue is choppy at best and at worst laughably unbelievable. No really, the things and ways these characters say what they say do a much better job of continually reminding the reader that this is a fake world than do all of the fantasy and science fiction elements of the story. Aside from that constant annoyance, I really did enjoy the book, until the ending, which really wasn't much of an ending at all. If there's a part two, I'll buy it. A collector of Jodorowsky's work should purchase MEGALEX. The casual fan could probably skip this one.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book 2 Nov 2006
By J. Grothaus - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I just finished this book and loved it! Set in a dark future. this first book is about a anomalous clone that is rescued from the megalex city by a tough chick named adama and brought to the rebel underground city. I won't ruin the the end for you but a battle insues between the industrial megalex city and the nature rebels of the prehistoric underground city. most excited I went back on Amazon to get The second book in english, but I only found it in german and french. I'll keep searching for it maybe it just hasn't come out in english yet.
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