Watch now


£61.95 + £1.26 UK delivery
In stock. Sold by EliteDigital UK

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Boy Meets Girl [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

Denis Lavant , Mireille Perrier , Leos Carax    DVD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: £61.95
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.

Region 1 encoding (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats.)

Note: you may purchase only one copy of this product. New Region 1 DVDs are dispatched from the USA or Canada and you may be required to pay import duties and taxes on them (click here for details). Please expect a delivery time of 5-7 days.



Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Amazon Family members enjoy 20% off every delivery of nappies. Join today to get your discount, as well as a free trial of Amazon Prime and access to exclusive offers and discounts.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Denis Lavant, Mireille Perrier, Carroll Brooks, Maïté Nahyr, Elie Poicard
  • Directors: Leos Carax
  • Writers: Leos Carax
  • Producers: Alain Dahan, Patricia Moraz
  • Format: Black & White, Colour, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Fox Lorber
  • DVD Release Date: 10 April 2001
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000059XTO
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 330,972 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
Leos Carax made a name for himself in the early-to-mid nineteen-eighties; emerging from the short-lived "cinema du look" movement with a pair of quirky and melancholic romantic fantasy films, Boy Meets Girl (1984) and Mauvais Sang (1986), before taking his central themes of unrequited love and alienated Parisian youth to the next conceivable level with the film Les Amants Du Pont-Neuf (1991). That particular film was supposed to be the one that would finally introduce Carax to a wider cinematic audience; finding the filmmaker refining his usual themes and structural preoccupations with a larger budget and much in the way of creative freedom. Sadly, things didn't go quite to plan; the eventual film - a wildly uneven though often quite captivating blend of romantic folly and violent social realism - went massively over-budget and over-schedule before finally limping out with a limited release almost half a decade later.

As with the other filmmakers at the forefront of the cinema du look movment - Luc Besson and Jean Jacques Beineix - Carax's work is high on style and short on plot; often seeming like a collection of random scenes, linked by one or two reoccurring characters, that accumulate over the course of the film's duration to create a kind of whole. His approach to filmmaking is very much akin to Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Kar-Wai, in the sense that the film is created from a brief outline and then improvised in the same way that a sculptor or a painter will work, often impressionistically, until a form begins to take shape.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:VHS Tape
Leos Carax made a name for himself in the early-to-mid nineteen-eighties; emerging from the short-lived "cinema du look" movement with a pair of quirky and melancholic romantic fantasy films, Boy Meets Girl (1984) and Mauvais Sang (1986), before taking his central themes of unrequited love and alienated Parisian youth to the next conceivable level with the film Les Amants Du Pont-Neuf (1991). That particular film was supposed to be the one that would finally introduce Carax to a wider cinematic audience; finding the filmmaker refining his usual themes and structural preoccupations with a larger budget and much in the way of creative freedom. Sadly, things didn't go quite to plan; the eventual film - a wildly uneven though often quite captivating blend of romantic folly and violent social realism - went massively over-budget and over-schedule before finally limping out with a limited release almost half a decade later.

As with the other filmmakers at the forefront of the cinema du look movment - Luc Besson and Jean Jacques Beineix - Carax's work is high on style and short on plot; often seeming like a collection of random scenes, linked by one or two reoccurring characters, that accumulate over the course of the film's duration to create a kind of whole. His approach to filmmaking is very much akin to Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Kar-Wai, in the sense that the film is created from a brief outline and then improvised in the same way that a sculptor or a painter will work, often impressionistically, until a form begins to take shape.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Companion To Eraserhead 10 Sep 2001
By R. Max Totten - Published on Amazon.com
I have finally found a film to view alongside David Lynch's Eraserhead! This film shot in Black and White has the same grotesque abnormalities of Eraserhead, as well as the deadpan humor. The characters are shape much the same way, lonely but lovable in that they deal with life's uncertainties and love that has failed or been lost.
Bountiful with all the Lynchian eccentricities that, either you'll find yourself understanding them or you just won't! The film, is playful in much the same way as early French New Wave but thought provoking and with a sense of muted charisma. This film will definitely take more that a one-time viewing to really get any thing out of it due to emotions flying high and low throughout. The shots of Paris at night are truly remarkable in that the warmth of the wet streets can almost be touched ,walked, and perhaps even a slight aroma can be imagined. The "you are there" surroundings seem like a heated dream you are about ready to wake up from. A surreal moment in modern french cinema or rather a filmed performance piece with textures abound. Watch with the intent of being a fly on the wall and you may experience certain particles of your life appear before your very eyes. ...
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars TUFF LOV! 18 Jun 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
This bizarre, graphic and ultimately very moving journey through love's little foibles is brilliantly realized by auteur LEOS CARAX. In some ways a 'throwback' to the glorious days of Alain Resnais - superbly photographed and deliberately paced to draw the viewer [voyeur?] into the lives of our loving couple. Carax later works disappoint slightly, but let's face it he never is quite as boring as the other 'would be's"!
If you yearn for a good moody art movie - get this one!
Then explore the beginnings of this movement!
4.0 out of 5 stars Carax and Jarmusch's First Films 2 Aug 2013
By Doug Anderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Leos Carax and Jim Jarmusch's First Films: While watching Leos Carax' first feature film BOY MEETS GIRL (1984), I couldn't help thinking of Jim Jarmusch's first feature PERMANENT VACATION (1980). Both films are about loners who wander the streets of their respective cities (Paris, New York) in search of love/art/identity/truth/their own voice-vision (everything young artists search for). Both films evoke the otherworldly Lautremont as the ultimate symbol of the artisitic loner on a journey to his own private nowhere. Both films are steeped in nostalgia for other time periods/cultural styles. The Carax film is primarily memorable for a very long party scene which is itself reminiscent of other such scenes in films from the 1960's (La Dolca Vita, La Notte) and this scene no doubt inspired many critics to link Carax to the New Wave, but within that party scene Carax includes an homage to the power of silent films and the peculiar power of silent film performance which is something the New Wave directors were intrigued by but never explored quite as thoroughly as Carax does here. I think what intrigues Carax about silent films is the way the silent film actors feel trapped in their own silent worlds and can only gesture toward other actors in a desperate (and futile) attempt to assuage that silence/solitude. In Boy Meets Girl the actors are each encased in an impenetrable cone of solitude/silence and there is no escape from this solitude/solipsism. As the film progresses it becomes increasingly theatrical, the actors become more desperate, and Carax' visual language/decor more and more grimly deterministic. Because of this film and its dark post-punk ennui/solipsism combined with a desperate and insatiable romantic yearning, Carax became a huge cult figure in French cinema. Jarmusch enjoys a similar reputation here in America. Jarmusch's vision is similarly visceral and solipsistic. But the actors are all much more subdued in Jarmusch's world and much more invested in the ethic and aesthetic of cool and the object of their desire is usually something much more abstract than love. In Permanent Vacation the object of desire is Paris and nothing really matters much to the young hero except that city, that symbol of art. This is the elsewhere, the dream that allows the hero to endure the emptiness of his own city. Both films feel like art school projects and they both are essentially that but thats why they work as documents/testaments by young artists about young artists. Both are about unfulfillable quests. Both find beauty in reaching for that impossible thing anyway. Both feature characters dancing alone in rooms as if rehearsing for a life/freedom/perfect moment that they know does not exist (except in cinema).
1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A weak beginning for a good director. 14 Jan 2006
By Angry Mofo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I admire Leos Carax. How could one not admire a man so fixated on his grandiose ideas that he once bankrupted three producers and built a life-size replica of part of central Paris? At the same time, I confess that I don't so much like Boy Meets Girl, his first film. It leaves me with a feeling of dissatisfaction.

The protagonist, who looks exactly like Nick Cave, is an unemployed young man of ambiguous origins. He lives by himself in a small room somewhere in one of the shadier parts of Paris. When he gets tired of hearing the bickering of the couple next door, he skulks about the streets with his portable cassette player and glowers darkly. By chance, he comes across a depressed young woman named Mireille, and follows her to a party somewhere. He makes her acquaintance, they talk about their woes, and then he gets her to bring him home with her. Finally, disaster strikes and their romance is tragically cut short.

Mireille is also disturbed. She lives with a man who hates her and whom she despises. This situation is painful to her, and has presumably gone on for a long time. However, she shows no desire to change it, and continues to live in idleness, although her boyfriend is not so rich or successful as to be able to provide her with a luxurious existence. She is not married to him, and they have no children. It appears that she has never loved him at any point in time.

The film presents these facts without explaining or analyzing them. So, we learn that the protagonist wants to be a film-maker, although he has never actually made a film, and he does not really want to go through the process of making one. Similarly, we are told that Mireille wanted to be a model, but failed for some reason. We do not learn how they came to accept the lifestyles that they now lead, or even what they think about them. They make no attempts to justify themselves. Consequently, they come across as total ciphers.

Worse yet, both of them are incapable of empathy with each other, or with anyone else. When the main character has a chance to talk to the heroine, he talks about his suffering, argues that the woman should love him because she will eventually grow old and lose her good looks, and suggests that she could participate in a polyamorous relationship with him and his ex-girlfriend. Earlier, we learn that he has mistreated his ex-girlfriend, lied to her and even hit her, and that she has left him. He does not wonder whether she might have had good reason to do so. Mireille's troubles do not interest him either. But he does not even attempt to analyze his own feelings. It is impossible to understand what thoughts, objects and activities comprise his world. His apartment is totally bare. The only object in it is a typewriter that he doesn't use.

Mireille, likewise, is devoid of compassion for anyone other than herself. In depicting her, the film does not show her ever having a single kind thought. Her self-obsession, however, is lacking in self-awareness. She wallows in endless self-pity without really thinking about her life, or even acknowledging events and people around her. She is unwilling to do so. The film gives no plausible explanation for what might have driven her to such a state. Because of this, it is difficult to take her angst seriously.

And, since the film revolves exclusively around the angst of the protagonists, that means that there is nothing else to engage the viewer's own empathy. The viewer is left to wonder, uncharitably, whether the main characters are not merely engaging in such strange behaviour to be fashionable, there being no apparent cause for it in their lives. As the tagline of the film is "love without regrets," this was probably not the director's intention.

In addition, the dialogue is badly written. Carax's later film Lovers On The Bridge is much stronger and more believable in this regard. Here, the characters talk into space, not to each other. With each thing they say, the film becomes progressively more detached from reality. The plot device used to separate the main characters in preparation for the tragedy is especially silly. When Mireille leaves the party and takes the protagonist along, he has to stop somewhere to use the restroom, and then becomes engrossed in an arcade game for no apparent reason, so Mireille gets tired and leaves without him. Carax dwells on the arcade game for longer than necessary. He's not alone there, though. Such acclaimed directors as Wim Wenders and Chris Marker were also unduly fascinated by eighties technology.

To top it all off, the film isn't particularly visually interesting. Certainly it pales in comparison to Carax's own later films. The blurb on the cover says something about "night scenes in Paris," but there are almost no such scenes. Most of the film takes place indoors, in generic-looking apartments and kitchens. Despite Carax's love of the French New Wave, his camera here is boring and static. There are just a couple of Godard-style jump cuts, awkwardly placed. But it's not that he doesn't have a voice of his own. He just hadn't found it yet by this point.

The one scene here that works perfectly is the one where the protagonist overhears his ex-girlfriend talking in bed with her new boyfriend. Not only is it realistic, in contrast with the overwrought monologues that comprise most of the script, but it suddenly makes the protagonist's angst more comprehensible. Surely any man who overheard a woman he loved saying such things would feel just about the same way. Still, I think that the film is weak on the whole, and that Carax's next two films are far superior in both style and content.
1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars beauty is skin deep... ugly goes all the way through 21 May 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
On the surface, Boy Meets Girl is a beautifully shot film... sort of a classic film noir meets French new wave. But scratch off the artistic cosmetics and this is one ugly boring waste of time. Lots of pretentious babble and angst. Unlikable characters and a plot so uninteresting, I just wanted to hit the fast-forward button. Leos Carax has some talent and smarts (check out Pola X and Les Amants du Pont Neuf) but this ranks up there as a throw-away.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xaf383f30)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback