Media and Morality: On the Rise of the Mediapolis and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a £3.91 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Media and Morality: On the Rise of the Mediapolis on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Media and Morality: On the Rise of the Mediapolis [Paperback]

Roger Silverstone
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
RRP: £17.99
Price: £17.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £0.82 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Wednesday, 24 Sep.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £16.31  
Hardcover £53.10  
Paperback £17.17  
Trade In this Item for up to £3.91
Trade in Media and Morality: On the Rise of the Mediapolis for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.91, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

4 Oct 2006
Roger Silverstone′s compelling new book places the global media at the heart of the moral future of civilisation. It argues that the media (the press, broadcasting, the Internet and increasingly peer–to–peer technologies and networks) have a profound significance for the way in which the world is understood by its citizens. It also argues that without a clear understanding of that significance, and without a critique of the way in which the media go about their daily business, we are likely to see an erosion in the capacity of human beings to understand and respect each other, especially those whom they see and hear only in their mediation. In a world of increasing polarisation and demonisation, the media have a powerful role to play. They can reinforce or they can challenge that polarisation. The book proposes that we should think of the global media as a mediapolis, a single space of political and social communication, in which the basis for the relationships between neighbours and strangers can be either constructed or destroyed. The mediapolis is a moral space, a space of hospitality, responsibility, obligation and judgement. And questioning its present and future requires attention to issues of media justice, media literacy and media regulation. Media and Morality is essential reading for all students and scholars of the media but will be of equal fascination to anyone interested in the workings of our modern world.

Frequently Bought Together

Media and Morality: On the Rise of the Mediapolis + Supermedia: Saving Journalism So It Can Save the World
Price For Both: £38.16

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Polity Press; 1 edition (4 Oct 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745635040
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745635040
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 14.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 516,566 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"[An immensely] complex and densely argued book. At the same time, it is intuitively in tune with many lay people, and possibly increasing numbers of journalists." Michael Bromley, Australian Journalism Review "What a wonderful book! A thoughtful and convincing narrative, theoretically enlightening, and explaining the necessary question: how is the medialized cosmopolitan public sphere – the mediapolis – possible? A new Habermas! A new cosmopolitan critical theory of the emerging global civil society and its contradictions." Ulrich Beck, University of Munich "This is a very intelligent and original book by one of the most consistently interesting writers on the media. It is the most penetrating discussion of the moral challenges posed by our relationship to modern media systems, technologies and institutions that I have read to date. Roger Silverstone tackles big and complex issues here which go quite beyond what has come to be regarded as the normal agenda of “media ethics”. In doing so he generates some original and I believe powerful analytical concepts which should begin to establish the new moral–critical agenda that he rightly judges to be so lacking in contemporary media studies." John Tomlinson, Nottingham Trent University "Roger Silverstone′s delicate meditation offers a guide to the perplexed for the citizen–audiences of the emerging global media sphere. Confronting a full agenda of problems facing humanity such as terrorism, theologico–military empires, and the proper distance toward minorities in an integrating world, Silverstone finds splinters of hope in the contradictory mess of mediated life today. The fact that media somehow bring the world together in a space of appearance, he argues in a style that is at once critical, nuanced, and bold, is enough to encourage us to think of media and morality in the same thought." John Durham Peters, University of Iowa

From the Back Cover

Roger Silverstone′s compelling new book places the global media at the heart of the moral future of civilisation. It argues that the media (the press, broadcasting, the Internet and increasingly peer–to–peer technologies and networks) have a profound significance for the way in which the world is understood by its citizens. It also argues that without a clear understanding of that significance, and without a critique of the way in which the media go about their daily business, we are likely to see an erosion in the capacity of human beings to understand and respect each other, especially those whom they see and hear only in their mediation. In a world of increasing polarisation and demonisation, the media have a powerful role to play. They can reinforce or they can challenge that polarisation. The book proposes that we should think of the global media as a mediapolis, a single space of political and social communication, in which the basis for the relationships between neighbours and strangers can be either constructed or destroyed. The mediapolis is a moral space, a space of hospitality, responsibility, obligation and judgement. And questioning its present and future requires attention to issues of media justice, media literacy and media regulation. Media and Morality is essential reading for all students and scholars of the media but will be of equal fascination to anyone interested in the workings of our modern world.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A speech I made about this book 15 July 2007
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Roger told me his favourite story - which is also in the book, about the Afghani blacksmith interviewed on the BBC world service at the height of the previous war in Afghanistan. When asked by a reporter why the Americans were bombing his country he tells the world that in his opinion "Al Qaeda must have killed many Americans and their donkeys and destroyed their castles".
Obviously, he was a perceptive political commentator who, no doubt, already has his own blog. Roger's point is that we need to hear this other voice if we are to understand our world.
Now for me you can replace that tribesman with a youth on a Manchester housing estate, an illegal immigrant who might clean buildings like these, or even a Bush supporting, evangelical Christian in Kansas. They are all connected. They are all significant. They all have a bearing on the ideologies and the facts that make up the real stories of this 21st century.
But how to connect? How to represent them? How to hear what they say?

Well this is what Roger says in the book:
"Our relation to the other, to the stranger, is the principal determinant of our moral worth and our status as human beings.... our media provide the most pervasive and
persuasive perceptual frameworks, in an increasingly global society, for the way in which meanings, representations and relationships to the other are offered and defined" (Pause)
(Silverstone 101)

I share his sense that the media - and for me - especially the news media - has this role.

One of Roger's many insights was that the conversation between media and society should not be simply bilateral negotiations. So the POLIS discourse is centred on a moral core.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 2.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great Topic... Much Too Wordy 2 Feb 2011
By avid reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The content of this book is very compelling and makes for a great read that will inspire thought and possibly change in your life; however, Silverstone is extremely wordy and you will often find that he talks in circles about unimportant and useless information.
Was this review helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback