Buy Used
£0.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by JULIES-BOOKSHOP
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: An EX LIBRARY copy in VERY GOOD condition.May have some library identification marks/stamps. Daily dispatch from UK warehouse. This book is in VERY GOOD overall condition, showing only light signs of previous ownership.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Media Ethics and Self-regulation Paperback – 27 Apr 2000


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£20.00 £0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:



Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Longman; 1 edition (27 April 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0582306051
  • ISBN-13: 978-0582306059
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 15.2 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,056,608 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Chris Frost is Professor of Journalism and director of the Centre for Responsible Journalism at Liverpool John Moores University in the UK and has been a journalist, editor and journalism educator for more than 40 years.
He is a member of the National Union of Journalist's National Executive and chair of the NUJ's Ethics Council. He is also a National Council member of the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom and sits on the NUJ's Professional Training Committee. He is also National Chair of the Association for Journalism Education and is a co-editor of the association's journal: Journalism Education.
He is a former President of the National Union of Journalists, a former member of the Press
Council and an executive board member of the Institute of Communication Ethics and sits on the editorial board of Ethical Space.
He has written several books on Journalism: Journalism Ethics and Regulation (now in production for a fourth edition); Designing for Newspapers and Magazines; Reporting for Journalists; and Media Ethics and Self-Regulation as well as several book chapters: Frost C (2014) A crisis of ethics: breaking the cycle of UK newspaper irresponsibility in Kevin Rafter & Mark O'Brien (eds) The State in Transition - Essays in honour of John Horgan; Frost C (2014) Journalism Education in the UK in Goodman, Robyn (ed) Journalism Education; Frost C (2014) Journalism ethics through accuracy in numbers Keeble, Richard and Mair, John (eds) Data Journalism: Mapping the Future London: Arima; Frost, C (2013) Who Regulates the Regulator? Mair, John (2013) After Leveson? The Future of British journalism London: Arima;
Frost, C (2012) Ethics and the newsroom culture in Keeble, Richard and Mair, John (2012) The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial London: Arima; Frost, C (2006)Local Ethics in Franklin, R (ed) Local Journalism and Local Media London: Routledge; Frost, C (2006) Press Complaints Commission: Ten years of self-regulation in Keeble, R (ed) Communication Ethics Today London: Troubador; Frost, C (2005) Design for Print Media in Keeble, R (ed) Print Journalism: A Critical Introduction London: Routledge; Frost, C (2005) The Press Complaints Commission in Walters, E and Johnson, A (eds) (2005) Decriminalising defamation: An IFJ campaign resource for defeating criminal defamation Brussels: IFJ. He has published widely in academic journals and regularly writes magazine and newspaper articles as well as broadcasting. He has spoken at conferences or worked as a consultant in much of Eastern Europe, Asia and South Africa.

Product Description

From the Back Cover

(front cover)
Media Ethics and Self Regulation
Chris Frost
Longman logo
(spine)
Media Ethics and Self Regulation
Frost
Longman logo
(back cover)
Media Ethics and Self Regulation
Chris Frost
The British press has been accused of drinking in the Last Chance Saloon. Now, with the coming of the new millennium, many fear that broadcasters are also getting a taste for the commercially-popular cocktail of sensation and intrusion that it sells.
But does it have to be like that? Are journalists doomed to ignore stories about important public interest issues in favour of titillating tales that pander solely to the public’s prurient curiosity? Are docusoaps and current affairs series based on questionable evidence replacing the award-winning documentary programmes of past years?
Media Ethics and Self Regulation looks closely at the moral dilemmas facing journalists in their day-to-day working lives and examines the self-regulatory bodies that police the various codes of practice.
The codes of practice are described in detail, considering whether in fact they do protect the people they claim to protect and how journalists can apply the codes in their working lives.
This book has been written for students and trainee journalists, working journalists and editors, and indeed for any student of the media.
Its accessible style and use of examples and case studies will help readers debate media ethics, analyse whether the media is capable of self regulation and evaluate the philosophical principles that underpin media codes of conduct.
Chris Frost is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Journalism at the University of Central Lancashire. In a journalistic career that spans more than 25 years, he has worked as a journalist and editor before turning to teaching. He is Chair of the National Union of Journalists’ Ethics Council, a member of the National Council of the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom, a former NUJ president and a former member of the Press Council. He has lectured extensively on media ethics world-wide.
Longman logo

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 18 Mar. 2001
Format: Paperback
I remember this time last year when I was studying journalism at the University of Central Lancashire. I'd left all my work really late and was having a right old stress about it. Having not attended many of the lectures, I had to try and learn the whole course in about 3 hours - it was an absolute nightmare. One of my friends lent me this book and thank god they did! It is the easiest book to understand on this topic and I was able to locate the relevant information pretty easily. The book is totally aimed at students studying ethics and that's why its an ideal book to use for essays. I do reckon it's a bit pricey but it's worth it because I probably would have failed without it. And what happened to me? Well I passed my journalism degree and now I work on a top national daily newspaper - can't be bad!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 Nov. 2000
Format: Paperback
Media Ethics is a massive subject and you need more than one book to be able to grasp a true understanding of the topic. Frost's book is a misguided attempt to try and put issues into laymans terms. But I'm afraid that can't be done. No attempt is made to link modern ethical issues like 'the individual's right to privacy' with ancient teachings on ethics.' My fear is that new students will walk away from this book thinking that Media Ethics is an entirely modern concept. Chris Frost is a good lecturer - I should know, I've been to a few of his lectures - but in his attempt to simplify the subject, he has created a flawed book which only scrapes the surface.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Oct. 2000
Format: Paperback
Like the others, I also used this book on my course. All I can say is that it must have worked because I came out with a first class honours! To be perfectly honest, I think there is very little to choose between a lot of ethics books. The important thing is to get a taste of a few of them and then draw your own conclusions - that's what you will get the marks for. To this end, the Chris Frost book is as good as any but if you're a poor, hard up student, it might be worth getting it from a library rather than stumping up the cash yourself!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 3 Oct. 2000
Format: Paperback
When I was studying ethics at university this was one of the books on my reading list. It sounded ideal so i went out and bought it. However, it was a bit sparse and I wouldn't reccomend it. There are far more interesting and well written books on the subject such as 'Media Ethics' by Brian McNair and 'Regulating the Media' (can't remember the author). If you have got loads of money then buy them all but if, like me, you are a poor student then save your money for one of the better ones.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback