Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

7
4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
2
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
I came into this book knowing absolutely nothing about the Mechwarrior or Battletech universe, and I naively had my doubts about the caliber of novels in this specific genre. Maybe it's the fact that I associate Battletech with PC and console gaming, but I was afraid this was just going to be a rather simplistic novel that served little purpose beyond framing a context in which huge metallic monsters can go at each other tooth and nail. My doubts turned out to be incredibly unfounded. I found Ghost War to be a complex, surprising, challenging read that combined action, drama, and well-placed bits of humor in a finely crafted package.
I did worry that I would be at a disadvantage here, not having read any of the earlier Battletech novels, but this first entry in the Mechwarrior: Dark Age series may well have posed fewer problems for me than for many of the Battletech gurus out there. Knowing nothing of the earlier history, I had no worries or questions about changes that had taken place in the Battletech universe during the preceding and apparently murky Golden Age of Peace spoken of here from the vantage point of 3132-3133. Much of that earlier history would seem to be minimized, in fact, because the computer network basically holding the Republic together over "the missing years" has now been taken out by unknown offenders, doing much to isolate the individual planets. With interplanetary communication greatly reduced, society's unsavory forces begin to climb back out of the shadows. Racial and cultural tensions increase, and greedy men seize the opportunity to play their little games of power. With internecine conflict simmering on a number of planets, the Republic finds its golden era of peace greatly threatened from within.
Fortunately, the Republic has certain individuals trained to observe, report, and work to forestall messy new conflicts in its sphere of influence. Special operatives dubbed Ghosts can be sent to infiltrate questionable planet-based organizations and work to ferret out the identities of the true bad guys out there, and the hero of this novel is one of the best. The story actually threw me for a bit of a loop about one hundred pages into it. I would like to say that Ghost War kept me guessing, but in all honesty I was so unprepared for what happened that I wasn't aware I should have been guessing in the first place. Battletech and Mechwarrior veterans are far too knowledgeable to fall for the plot device that zinged me, I imagine, but I did indeed get zinged. For this reason, I will refrain from really going into any detail about the plot.
I have sort of looked down upon series books of this type in the past (it's shameful, I know), but I vow to change my attitude from this point on. Ghost War is an intricate, carefully woven story that keeps the reader on his toes until the very end. My first Battletech novel will not be my last, and I can only hope that other Battletech authors can rival the talent of Michael A. Stackpole.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Sam Donelly is working as a Lumbermech on the forest planet of Helen when he is thrown in major deep trouble. Across the whole inner-sphere there is no communication between planets (hence 'Dark Age') and the Republic fears that isolation and no communication will lead to worlds being overtaken by tyrants. And it is Sam's job to make sure that doesn't happen on the rainforest world of Basalt.

It sounds intriguing but there is hardly any action and when it does finally happen it's not described in a particularly engaging way which is a shame. What we end up with is a Tom Clancy novel set in the Battletech/Mechwarrior universe.

This is how the novel ends up being a real mixed bag. While it is a good way for non-fans to be introduced to the Battletech/Mechwarrior universe it isn't such a great or meaningful story. Tho Stackpole seems to think the novel should be held in higher regard and writes it in such a way that could be interpreted as arrogance.

Written in the first-person perspective the Narrator Sam/Mason makes quite a few remarks near the beginning about how we are reading a fine piece of literature. Now this may be a bit of sarcastic humor that Stackpole is playing on us but a pulp novel that is no more than a spin-off from the Battletech franchise is NOT fine literature. Trust me kids, study this for your English papers and you will likely fail.

Tho it is a BIT better written than one would expect from a novel of such origins and the 39 chapters are all separated in 7 pages slices with a small, but relevant, quotation opening each of them. And, as with most novels of this character, the first-person narrative is useless and nothing would be lost if the book were told in omnipotence. There is no REAL personal side to the narrator. He may be a cool character but there is no point in it just being HIS story.

Read if you like Battletech/Mechwarrior or want to be introduced to the universe. Stay away if you have desires to read some of the other, better, entries.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 6 December 2005
I approached this book, I admit, with many doubts. Far too many, as it came out. The re-foundation of the BattleTech universe was a shock for an old fan like me, but my judgement about this "new deal" changed along with the one about the book. Michael Stackpole has a flowing, intelligent and witty style that kept me glued to each page until the very end, yearning for the next turn of events. Events which, though always described in detail, keep the reader focused and eager for more. The main character is someone you can't but love, and you'll soon discover there's so much more to discover about him than it first looks like.
This is exactly what I was referring to in the title: do not do like me and start this book in a period where your schedule is tight ;).
A wonderful introduction for the new (but you will soon realize it's the same old Battletech action we learned to love, with a lot of new, interesting opportunities) universe. The events that shook the foundations of the Inner Sphere are described in many sections of the book in a very good, balanced way. Besides, the presence of an old knowledge of all Classic Battletech universe's lovers will surely help to make you feel again "at home". But that should not be a problem: the book is so well conceived that you will soon forget all doubts about things being so very different than they used to.
Definitely worth buying!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I didn't expect much from this book - an unknown author, and a 'franchise' universe. I am happy to admit that I was very pleasantly suprised when I discovered an extremly interesting military hard sf universe, a very good author (I am now grabbing anything Stackpole-related I can put my hands on) and, last but not least, a great book. Main character is extremly 'cool' - not your stereotypical 'good guy', definetly, and the plot is full of interesting twists - I expected to be suprised once, twice...but Stackpole managed to pull a bag of suprises on me. 5 stars. Enjoy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 1 February 2003
When someone takes something that has been running for years, has a hefty fan base and then resets the starting grid, people tend to grouse. Having a universe turned upside down tends to give long-standing supporters the heebie-geebies as everything they've taken for granted is tossed around and shaken up. So when Mike Stackpole presents us with the first book in a new era of Battletech, expect a lot of teeth-clenching and nervous looks...
You see, not only has the plot line changed, but so has the style of writing - Stackpole has taken a rather bold departure from the norm and written "Ghost War" in the first person. Gasp! Horror! No...
Let's get to the point - this is a fun, exciting and even humourous book. The story is very much a scene-setter, based on the communications blackout across the Inner Sphere. As such, the paranoia and claustrophobic feel of writing in the first person does wonders for making you feel as if you're there. The lead character doesn't know what's going on elsewhere, so you don't - it's a clever device that has also pulled the wool over the eyes of more than a few fans who belive that EVERYTHING in the Battletech (now Mechwarrior Darkage) universe has changed. As we begin to find out as the story unfolds, the Great Houses are still there, so are the Clans, so are mercenaries - and just because it isn't mentioned, doesn't mean it isn't still around...
The best bit about this book is that Mike Stackpole makes a couple of sly gags at his own expense, including a couple of stabs at "literature" - class! The character, Sam/Mason, is a welcome departure from the standard supreme hero, Victor (who appears within - read to find out!) - while it's impossible not to draw links between the two, the clandestine, down and dirty nature of Sam's "work" marks him as a grey-er hero than we've been used to.
If you go into this book expecting the expected, be prepared for a shock. If you go into this as a preparation for what's to come, I think this book will make you look to the future of the series with great expectations. Buy "Ghost War" and prepare for what's to come....
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 7 January 2003
I don't know if it was because I had just finished reading Storms of Fate and Endgame, neither of which I could put down, or whether it's because Stackpole had the duty of starting an entirely new story line, but I found this book slightly disappointing. I found myself reminded of Assumption of Risk, which I regard as Stackpole's weakest Battletech novel. Both were still good books, but neither were addictive or forced me to read them compulsively. Still, this is a good book. I wouldn't recommend it for a first timer, either to Battletech or Stackpole, but a good one for veterans.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 March 2013
Not a bad read, a bit political and not much 'mech action, but hopefully will get better in the next book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.