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Meaty, Beaty, Big And Bouncy
 
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Meaty, Beaty, Big And Bouncy

25 Nov 2013 | Format: MP3

£8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £8.15 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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2:12
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2:42
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 22 Nov 2013
  • Release Date: 22 Nov 2013
  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 1990 Geffen Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:51
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00BVL2P9Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 29,836 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Og Oggilby TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Mar 2010
Format: Audio CD
This collection dates from the early 1970s - I've still got a rather battered Track Records vinyl edition mouldering in my record collection - and to me, it's one of the best, most concise collections of Who material, up until 1970, that is, it containing nothing from 'Who's Next'. However, by yoking together their singles (and The Who were one of the all-time great singles bands, let us not forget) it sheds a lot of light on Pete Townshend as a developing lyric writer, and The Who as a combo of awesome power. And, while I'm at it, let's hear it for Roger Daltrey - he had to sing Townshend's lyrics, and he did (and still does) so with grace and a bravura flourish that shows him to be the equal of the other three original band members.

Opening with their debut single, 'I Can't Explain', a straight lift of The Kinks early block-chord breakthrough hits, for sure, but already Townshend adds his own lyrical vulnerability into the mix. The Ivy League provided backing vocal harmonies, and apparently Jimmy Page played lead guitar, but this is The Who all the way. The edited version of 'The Kids Are Alright' is still a touching and - I'll use that word again - vulnerable lyric. As an aside, I was (pleasantly) shocked when I first heard the unedited album version, which includes a little more of Townshend's power chord flailing - several years later. 'Happy Jack' is a delightful curio (I heard this first on Sam Costa's show on the old BBC Light Programme, probably between Guy Mitchell and the George Melachrino strings!), and 'I Can See For Miles' is still possibly the purest distillation of the band's controlled power.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Oct 2000
Format: Audio CD
Contains some of the greatest Who songs up to 1968. I love the extended version of I'm A Boy, though the removal of the guitar solo in The Kids Are Alright is a disappointment. Turn the lights out and your strobe light on, and pump the volume right up - The 'Oo should sound BIG!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By XBBX on 29 Dec 2011
Format: Audio CD
Despite originally being compiled in 1970 for a vinyl issue, this album on CD remains an essential purchase both for those with a passing interest in The Who and for those who are already fans of the band but may not own a Who compilation.

Although Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy is to all intents and purposes a gathering together of The Who's pre-1970 British singles (Boris The Spider and the alternate take of I'm A Boy being the exceptions), I've always considered it to be very much a compilation of two halves; The first of seriously explosive Modernist Power-Pop/proto-Rock, the second of largely novelty/comedy themed material. The former alone makes this nothing less than a required Who collection.

I fully understand humour is an integral part of the Who's musical palette, but it's never sat well with me when placed directly alongside their more seriously ferocious, arrogant and angry offerings!

A couple of quick notes about the tunes on the disc; The Kids Are Alright is the US single release with the noisy middle section edited out. Happy Jack has an alternate drum track to that found on the regular single (although you may have to listen closely to tell the difference). Magic Bus is the shorter stereo version (with a surprisingly prominent harshness to the backing vocals), the timing on the CD's rear cover for this track is incorrect by approximately one minute. I'm A Boy is a slower version recorded a couple of months after the more common single release (and has a much longer instrumental section).

Putting the music aside for a second, it has to be mentioned that for an early CD (this disc was mastered in 1985 and has never since been remastered) the mastering is on the whole very good.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bill melia on 22 Oct 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Lost lots of my old Who back catalogue on vinyl in house fire . Think this one best of old Who nearly every track released on old vinyl 45,s
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sheila King on 11 Oct 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I had lost my copy of Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy and am very happy to have this copy! Thanks!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith M TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 1 Aug 2012
Format: Audio CD
This 1971 singles compilation by The Who presents an outstanding snapshot of the (early) music made by this great band. Released at around the same time as their album Who's Next which, together with its successor album Quadrophenia, constituted, for me, the band's creative peak, this collection demonstrates in abundance what a great singles band Pete Townshend's boys really were. OK, much (indeed, all) of this material has reappeared on the later plethora of Who compilations, but the thing I find particularly appealing about Meaty Beaty Big And Bouncy is that it is not 'contaminated' by some of the band's later, weaker material - here we have 13 essential singles (OK, with a slight fluctuation in quality) plus John Entwhistle's quirky curiosity, Boris The Spider (taken from the A Quick One album). Of course, the other plus point about this album is the cover, which contains two photos (originally appearing on the front and back of the old vinyl album cover) - one with the band members looking out of a run-down tenement window at four boys (urchins, maybe) staring at the camera, and no doubt symbolically representing the band members in their youth, whilst the second photo has the positions of the boys/band members reversed. These photos capture the sound and spirit of the band (and the times) brilliantly.

Of course, the music should be familiar to us all. Along with the Kinks, my favourite singles band from this era. There is some variation in the standard of Townshend's songs from this period, but still not a duff track, just a series of short, punchy, hook-laden gems, featuring (incidentally) the greatest drummer and bass player in rock music (although Entwhistle's playing is frequently relegated more to the background in much of this early material).
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