Buy Used
£4.98
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by scrumpyjane
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Great video in a box-set complete with booklet, please see images from scrumpyjane for actual product, vey small amount of wear to the box edges, collectors item! fast dispatch, UK SELLER
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Mean Streets [VHS]

4.3 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

1 used from £4.98 1 collectible from £3.20

Product details

  • Actors: Robert De Niro, Harvey Keitel, David Proval, Amy Robinson, Richard Romanus
  • Directors: Martin Scorsese
  • Writers: Martin Scorsese, Mardik Martin
  • Producers: E. Lee Perry, Jonathan T. Taplin
  • Language: English
  • Classification: R (Restricted) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Run Time: 112 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00008T3V2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 527,395 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Great video in a box-set complete with booklet, please see images from scrumpyjane for actual product, vey small amount of wear to the box edges, collectors item! fast dispatch, UK SELLER

From Amazon.co.uk

After Martin Scorsese went to Hollywood in 1972 to direct the low-budget Boxcar Bertha for B-movie mogul Roger Corman, the young director showed the film to maverick director John Cassavetes and got an instant earful of urgent advice. "It's crap," said Cassavetes in no uncertain terms, "now go out and make something that comes from your heart." Scorsese took the advice and focused his energy on Mean Streets, a riveting contemporary film about low-life gangsters in New York's Little Italy that critic Pauline Kael would later call "a true original, and a triumph of personal filmmaking." Starring Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel in roles that announced their talent to the world, it set the stage for Scorsese's emergence as one of the greatest American filmmakers. Introducing themes and character types that Scorsese would return to in Taxi Driver, GoodFellas, Casino, and other films, the loosely structured story is drawn directly from Scorsese's background in the Italian neighbourhoods of New York, and it seethes with the raw vitality of a filmmaker who has found his creative groove. As the irresponsible and reckless Johnny Boy, De Niro offers striking contrast to Keitel's Charlie, who struggles to reconcile gang life with Catholic guilt. More of an episodic portrait than a plot-driven crime story, Mean Streets remains one of Scorsese's most direct and fascinating films--a masterful calling card for a director whose greatness was clearly apparent from that point forward. --Jeff Shannon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Orson Welles said that a director's first film was always his best because he would put more into it and hadn't got into bad habits like developing a style yet. Mean Streets may not be Scorsese's first film, but it otherwise bears out Welles' words. Set in New York's Little Italy, Harvey Keitel plays Michael, who exists on the fringes of crime and whose dreams of managing a restaurant his money-lending uncle is about to take over are threatened by his affair with his epileptic cousin (Amy Robinson) and his terminally unreliable childhood friend Johnny Boy's pressing debts.

As with Goodfellas, it is plot-lite and style heavy, but where in the latter the style dominated, here it has a rough-cut and ready-dubbed feel that energises the film and accurately reflects the precarious state of the characters, be it financial, mental or moral. All the trademarks are here - the tracking shots down bars, the sudden explosions of violence, a popular music soundtrack that exists as much within the film as over it, the concern with incompatibility of religion with everyday life - but here they are fresh and integral to the film rather than carefully stage-managed.

If De Niro's unstable Johnny Boy now looks a bit too much like barnstorming with many of the tricks he has since pretty much worn out through over-use, Keitel's diplomatic lead and the astonishingly natural performances from the supporting cast are the real glue that holds the film together and convince us we are eavesdropping on real lives.

Filled with astonishing moments Mean Streets remains one of the few key American films of the early Seventies that still grabs your undivided attention with none of its original power diluted by time and imitation.
Comment 13 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Mean Streets is directed by Martin Scorsese who also co-writes the screenplay with Mardik Martin. It stars Harvey Keitel, Robert De Niro, David Proval, Amy Robinson, Richard Romanus and Cesare Danova. Plot finds Keitel as Charlie, a young Italian-American crook trying to work his way up the New York Mafia scene. But his way is blocked by Catholic guilt and his obligation to take care of loose cannon pal Jonny Boy (De Niro), who is in debt to hoods and doesn't seem to care.

A film of significant firsts. It would begin the Scorsese/De Niro relationship that served cinema so well and it laid the foundation for Scorsese's hoodlum filmic empire. Viewing Mean Streets now is an odd experience, for although there are some great things to sample, the piece undeniably seminal in the history of American cinema, it also plays as a pretty straight forward film. There are no surprises in store, the trajectory of characterisations runs true and goes exactly where you expect it too. Had I personally watched it upon release in 1973 I'm sure I would have been a bit more awed, but it very much feels over-rated now, with some critical appraisals of it appearing to pump it up more because of its importance than for any narrative quality.

As Scorsese goes for gritty realism, the story at the core lacks vibrancy. It's only when De Niro (jumping-bean) as borderline nutter Jonny Boy is doing his nutter Jonny Boy thing, does the picture actually perk up. The roll call of characters aren't engaging since they aren't fleshed out, the girl characters are badly written and the key bar-room brawl is very unconvincing.
Read more ›
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Robert Deniro plays a footloose, lazy and irresponsible small-timer who gets into financial bother he can't get out from. Harvey Keitel plays the well-connected and well-liked gangster who tries his best to get Deniro out of trouble.

Mean Streets does not have a constructive storyline; it merely shows events taking place in the life of small time gangsters in New York. It operates in a subtle way, making us aware of something rather than answering questions with regards to issues concerned. Its good to see Deniro in one of his early roles, but the story focuses more on Keitel whose performance is outstanding.

This is an important film for many reasons. This is the first major motion picture from Scorsese, where he introduces his unique style of directing and camera-work, which must have seemed so refreshing at the time of its release. It was far more compelling than anything else made at the time. The documentary style works well in telling a realistic and gritty story, this film-making process became a 70's trademark in years to come. 70's cinema is an important decade in film, as it was a time of social change in America which gave rise to a new breed of talent e.g. Francis Ford Coppola, William Friedkin etc. Mean Streets sits firmly as one of the first iconic films of that decade (the other is French Connection).

It is also an important film for anyone who is a fan of Scorsese or a serious fan of film itself. The narrative in his future films (Taxi Driver, Casino, Raging Bull, and Goodfellas) is similar to that of Mean Streets, and it's interesting to see that Scorsese carried the same style, but to better effect in his future projects. The fact that his future films are deemed as classics makes Mean Streets even more compelling.
Read more ›
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
amazing 0 3 Aug 2014
See all discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback