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  • Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust [VINYL]
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Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust [VINYL]


Price: £25.09 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£25.09 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
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Amazon's Sigur Rós Store

Music

Image of album by Sigur Rós

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Image of Sigur Rós

Videos

Sigur Ros: Valtari Film Experiment

Biography

"valtari is 54 minutes of blissful sadness and sorrowful joy...powerful and profound, yet simultaneously delicate & distraught" 4.5 /5 The Fly
"It feels really good to be in this band right now. Everyone's really excited again." Jonsi (Drowned In Sound Feature)

Sigur Rós - Valtari

New album released on 28th May 2012 on Parlophone

Sigur ... Read more in Amazon's Sigur Rós Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust [VINYL] + Takk... + Agaetis Byrjun [VINYL]
Price For All Three: £56.77

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Product Features

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Product details

  • Vinyl (11 Nov. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B001AQYPJK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 100,290 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Gobbledigook
2. Inní mér syngur vitleysingur
3. Góðan daginn
4. Við spilum endalaust
5. Festival
6. Með suð í eyrum
Disc: 2
1. Ára bátur
2. Illgresi
3. Fljótavík
4. Straumnes
5. All alright

Product Description

SIGUR ROS Med Sud I Eyrum Vid Spilum Endalaust [With A Buzz In Our Ears We Play Endlessly] (2008 UK limited edition 11-track double LP. Inspired by the unfettered feeling of the acoustic performances filmed during Heima the album glows with the perfect imperfection of live takes the sounds of fingers playing guitar strings cracked notes and a stark upfront presence not found in previous recordings. Including the singles Gobbledigook Inní mér syngur vitleysingur & Við spilum endalaust picture sleeve. The sleeve has only minimal wear whilst the vinyl is in near as new condition with very little signs of play)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Birch VINE VOICE on 24 Jun. 2008
Format: Audio CD
Sigur Rós's astonishing 1999 LP, "Ágaetis Byrjun", was unreplicable. In the years since, they've made catchier songs and noisier songs; but nothing quite matches the otherworldly ambience of their early masterpiece. "Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust" marks a change of direction. In short, it's the first time Sigur Rós have sounded like a band, rather than a school of whales at the bottom of a fjord.

The first four songs are fresh, sunkissed, acoustic, playful: you'd hardly believe it's still Sigur Rós, but it all works beautifully. The message is clear: this is a fun album, a soundtrack for summer, for festivals, for beaches, for running naked across roads. After this brilliant opening, the album loses momentum a little (in particular, "Ára bátur" is overlong and overblown, with choirs and orchestras battling with the vocals for space in your ears), but it's all done with enough verve to keep your finger away from the skip button. "Með suð" is by far Sigur Rós's most accessible record, and is a fine place for newcomers to start.

The bottom line is that "Með suð" is good news: the successful sonic evolution of one of the most consistently interesting bands in the world today.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Travis Bickle on 18 Jun. 2008
Format: Audio CD
After finding out that music maestro 'Flood' was to produce their 5th album, I was a little,(some may say justified) cautious about this new offering from Icelandic cloud landscapers, Sigur Ros.

Their new and latest free download Gobbledigook, took me somewhat by surprise, it's a brave move. I couldn't help but think bands like 'The Flaming Lips' could carry this off with absolute ease, but as a Sigur Ros track, for me, didn't really work.

I couldn't help but think it's like someone taking a wild endangered animal, sticking it in a cage and getting it to perform tricks for a paying audience. Thankfully, the other tracks are as good as anything they have done previous. Some Sigur Ros purists still may be a little disappointed with its more structured sound, but for me, I'm happy to report, it still sounds pretty darn good.

I think it's a fine mix of lets try something new/with not wanting to alienate their core audience, the only slight problem for me is that at times it seems a little obvious and slightly mechanical. Compared to their usual style of organically producing stunning backdrops for movies that have never been made, Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust, may be a tad forced, I like my Sigur Ros tracks less obvious, taking something different from them every time I hear them.

Having said that, it isn't a criticism, just a personnel preference.

I read a review that said "some of the tracks sound a little OTT", couldn't help but laugh when you consider this is a band who live in Iceland, record music in churches and caves and sing in a made up language no one can decipher.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By MPWB on 24 Jun. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Following on from the bittersweet atmospherics of Takk..., the verbosely titled Með suð í eyrum við spilum endalaust is imbued with essentially the same approach but this time the tracks are more shaped, and lean far less towards the largely instrumental symphonies of Takk..., bad news for those at the BBC in charge of soundtracking clips of everything from horse racing to obituaries. Not that the more frequent presence of lyrics and semi-choruses makes a tremendous difference to the overall mood that the band create; Icelandic is a language little understood in the English speaking world and as a consequence whatever it is that Jónsi Birgisson is actually enunciating merely adds to and meshes with the wall of sound created by the rest of the band and what is obviously a veritable army of strings and choirs and what might just possibly be the haunting wails and whimpers of the long-deceased. At times, as on Festival (one of two tracks here with an English title, three if you include the misspelt Gobbledigook), the music is so impossibly sad and weary that even Birgisson sounds morbidly depressed and broken. Somehow though, it all works and as with Hoppipolla on Takk... there is often a curious euphoria to what the band conjure up. The epic Ára bátur begins in so funereal a fashion that it could easily soundtrack a walk on the windswept moors with the Bronte sisters and its orchestral climax is so stirring that is could serve as a sort of requiem for every single thing that has ever happened, like someone finally cracking under the weight of the terrible beauty of it all. With this in mind, some may view the opening Gobbledigook as a form of misdirection, a sleight of hand that suggests an album of Flaming Lips-type eccentricity.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rev Q Sand on 28 Nov. 2008
Format: Audio CD
I think this album is a transitional one for Sigur Ros. They've become a band that had a specific sound and they were no doubt aware that they needed to develop their style to avoid stagnation.

With their latest release there are clear signs that the band wanted to make a different kind of a record. The songs are shorter, more acoustic sounding and generally more upbeat. They've tried to rely less on tried and tested ways of working and moved towards spontaneity and improvisation.

At least half of the album sounds a little different for Sigur Ros especially with the single "Gobbledegook" with its tribal drumming, hand claps and chanting. A couple of the tracks almost border on indie pop which would have been very out of place on the "( )" album from a few years ago.

The rest of the album is on more familiar ground but at the same time it doesn't feel like a band going through the motions. The track "Festival" bridges the two styles of the album by sounding beautifully sad and slow to begin with and then upbeat and euphoric towards the end.

If there was one criticism it's only that taken as a whole it feels more like a collection of songs than a carefully constructed album. Previous releases felt like they had been carefully planned out whilst this one feels more like a collection of songs that they happened to be working on at the time (if this makes sense).

I think it will be interesting to hear what they do next. They've had the courage to try out new ideas so who knows what this will lead to?
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