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Mccabe And Mrs Miller [VHS]


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Product details

  • Actors: Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, Rene Auberjonois, William Devane, John Schuck
  • Directors: Robert Altman
  • Writers: Robert Altman, Brian McKay, Edmund Naughton
  • Producers: David Foster, Mitchell Brower, Robert Eggenweiler
  • Language: English
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Warner
  • VHS Release Date: 3 April 2000
  • Run Time: 121 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004CML0
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 259,713 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

1902: John McCabe (Warren Beatty) turns up in a northwest mining town called Presbyterian Church, starts gambling and sets up a successful brothel with his girlfriend Constance (Julie Christie), an opium-addicted madam. They refuse an offer from the mine operators to buy them out, but the mine bosses refuse to take no for an answer.

Synopsis

A deeply moving film about love and the pursuit of wealth in early America. McCabe, a small time gambler and Mrs. Miller a madam, go into "business" together. McCabe soon has trouble expressing his true feelings to Mrs. Miller. She in turn relies on opium to distract her from her own personal sorrows. --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Vince Cabrera on 11 Sep 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is a beautifully shot movie, full of elegant, sombre tableaux. The interiors all look dark and brooding (a little like chiaroscuro oil paintings) The film works so well with the Leonard Cohen songs used in the score that the music seems to have been written with the film in mind.
On another level, this film is a rather jaundiced vision of the old west. There are no tall blond cowboys riding off into the sunset (a la "Shane"), or illiterate but charismatic characters (as in Sergio Leone's movies) This is a snowbound West full of chisellers, sleazy opportunists and madmen. Bleary saloon-bound no-hopers. Altman's vision owes a lot more to the "streetwise" movies of the 1970s than to anything ever made by John Ford. Imagine if Tom Waits had been a scriptwriter rather than a musician and you'll get some idea of what this film is like.
Altman presents the ragged backside of America's Western myth but with a certain tenderness and love for his characters and their inability to communicate with each other which is missing in a lot of his later films. I wouldn't hesitate to call it a minor masterpiece.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. E. Holden on 13 July 2008
Format: DVD
"You who must leave everything that you cannot control, it begins with your family but soon it comes down to your soul".. and so Leonard Cohen's most haunting lines and ambigously beautiful melodies flow into this greatest of Altman movies.

This is a borderland America, a mystic new-born America, a brutal and tragic land in which life is cheap and full of strife.

The typical Altman charm is here, the melee of life spills from the screen, voices of extras treated with the same reverence as those of our heroes, Beatty and Christie.

These two stars are in their prime and portray a delicious frisson of romance. Beatty is full of lucky bravado, but retains a steadfast honour in love and as his life becomes at risk. Christie is at her cheekiest, cajoling her way through strife, a formidable character.

Which brings me to Leonard Cohen. A great songwriter and poet who peaked in the work for this film. The first time I saw this film I was blown away by the music, its enough to make a great film all by itself.

It is not all by itself though, it complements one of the great human Director's works. A brilliant piece of historical drama and a brilliant work of art.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bob Salter TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Feb 2011
Format: DVD
A lot of people tend to forget that Robert Altman's career started in TV, where with the likes of Sam Peckinpah he gained a good grounding in westerns. He directed episodes from "Bonanza", "US Marshall", "Maverick" and "Tenderfoot". These were all very traditional western offerings, but when he revisited this ground again in 1971, he decided as they say, to do something completely different. What he gave us was a very realistic, mud and rags vision of the west. I have seen many photos taken from that western period, and it is clear that Altman has done the same. The little settlement of Presbyterian Church, is an absolutely authentic looking ramshackle mining settlement, of the type that boomed and bust so often. Altman deliberately shot during the rains that are so prevalent in the far north west, to enhance the bleak look. He also cleverly pre fogged and filtered much of the film, to give it an aged and melancholy look. The final result is a most unusual and very fine film indeed, which simply shows the west for what it really was, and not the highly mythicised Hollywood version. Altman described it as an anti western, but far from debunking the traditional western, it merely shows us how it was 'warts and all'. Whether or not you want the warts is a matter of personal taste!

The story concerns McCabe a drifter/gambler, played by Warren Beatty, who rides into a one horse mining community in America's wild and wet far north west at the beginning of the twentieth century. It does not take him long to sniff out a business opportunity, employing some rather shopworn looking ladies of ill repute. He is soon joined in this business adventure by the feisty madam Mrs Miller, who has a few more women with her and a head for business.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Four Violets VINE VOICE on 4 April 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This would have merited five stars but for the ending, which disappointed me horribly. But perhaps that's just a measure of how much I was into the characters and the incredibly authentic period setting of small-town America mining pioneers living a harsh life in mud I could feel sucking at my feet and swirling blizzards that made me shiver and glad I was inside in the warm. John McCabe (Warren Beatty) may be an ace cardsharp but his masculine pride refuses to let him admit that Mrs Miller (Julie Christie), bordello madam and associate, might have a superior business acumen. The ever-downbeat Leonard Cohen tracks provide a suitably gloomy, pessimistic background to the story of the pair, with only ever a shred of hope that their emerging affection for each other could come to anything.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By PodHunter on 20 April 2014
Format: DVD
What is the point of this film? If its intention was to illustrate the hard living in a mountainous mining town, where it is either snowing or raining, then it succeeded.

If it intended to illustrate existentialist nihilism, then it achieved that too.

If you expected a firecracker relationship between Julie Christie and Warren Beattie, then you'll be disappointed.
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