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Matrix [UMD Mini for PSP] [1998]


Price: £2.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Frequently Bought Together

Matrix [UMD Mini for PSP] [1998] + Matrix: Reloaded [UMD Mini for PSP] [2003] + Matrix Revolutions [UMD Mini for PSP] [2003]
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Product details

  • Actors: Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, Joe Pantoliano
  • Directors: Andy Wachowski, Larry Wachowski
  • Producers: Joel Silver
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: 23 Jan 2005
  • Run Time: 130 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (319 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000BY6OAA
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 120,355 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

This hugely successful blockbuster stars Keanu Reeves as Neo, a young computer hacker who comes to believe that the world around him is not as it appears to be. With the aid of mysterious subversive Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne), Neo discovers that his whole existence as he knows it is a lie. Together with Morpheus' acolyte Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss), Neo begins to fight back against the computerised hierarchy which is secretly manipulating the human race.

From Amazon.co.uk

The Wachowski Brothers' The Matrix took the well-worn science fiction idea of virtual reality, added supercharged Hollywood gloss and a striking visual style and stole The Phantom Menace's thunder as the must-see movie of the summer of 1999. Laced with Star Wars-like Eastern mysticism, and featuring thrilling martial arts action choreographed by Hong Kong action director Yuen Woo Ping (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), The Matrix restored Keanu Reeves to genre stardom following virtual reality dud Johnny Mnemonic (1995), and made a star of Carrie-Anne Moss, who followed this with the challenging perception twister Memento (2000). Helping the film stand out from rivals Dark City (1998) and The Thirteenth Floor (1999) was the introduction of the celebrated "bullet time" visual effects, though otherwise the war-against-the-machines story, hard-hitting style and kinetic set-pieces such as the corporate lobby shoot-out lean heavily on Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). Elsewhere the influence of John Woo, from the ultra-cool near real-world SF of Face/Off (1997) to the raincoats and sunglasses look of bullet-ballet A Better Tomorrow, is clearly in evidence. The set-up isn't without its absurdities, though--quite why super-intelligent machines bother to use humans as batteries instead of something more docile like cows, for example, is never explained, nor is how they expect these living batteries to produce more energy than it takes to maintain them. The Matrix is nevertheless exhilarating high-octane entertainment, although as the first part of a trilogy it perhaps inevitably doesn't have a proper ending.

On the DVD: the anamorphically enhanced 2.35:1 image is virtually flawless, exhibiting only the grain present in the theatrical print, while the Dolby Digital 5.1 sound is demonstration quality, showing off the high-impact sound effects and Don Davis' fine score to great effect. Special features are "data files" on the main stars, producer and director and "Follow the White Rabbit", which if selected while viewing the movie offers behind the scenes footage. This is interesting, but gimmicky, requires switching back from widescreen to 4:3 each time, and would be better if it could be accessed directly from one menu. There is also a standard 25-minute TV promo film which is as superficial as these things usually are. --Gary S Dalkin --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 47 people found the following review helpful By William Meikle on 24 Feb 2003
Format: DVD
SF Movies have suffered from a lack of style in recent years. There's only so many times you can see Bladerunner or Alien ripped off cheaply before you start to get jaded. And it doesn't help that they keep casting muscular dolts with the intellect of a plank in violent revenge fantasies that do little more than ape the "Death Wish" movies.
So it's three cheers for The Matrix, the film that restored my faith in SF movies.
It starts with a bang, a chase across rooftops with some spectacular leaps that make you realise that wherever you are, it's not the world you live in.
Or is it?
Neo (or is that Neophyte?) is a programmer by day in a faceless corporation, and a hacker by night, searching for Morpheus, a shadowy figure who may hold the key to Neo's longings for a different world. Morpheus on the other hand is looking for a Saviour, someone who will come and lead the oppressed masses to a new Utopia.
Soon their paths cross, and Neo is shown the real world, a world that is not all he thought it to be. In this world everything is run by "The Matrix", a super computer that controls everything and everybody, body and soul. (Or, as the Oracle so succinctly puts it, "Balls to Bones")
Neo is removed from the system's influence, and is told he is "The One", the long-prophesised saviour who can remake the Matrix to his own will. He is trained in how to fight the Matrix defense programs (or "Agents".....software that takes the guise of super-powerful humans and can take control of anybody still hooked up to the Matrix)
To accomplish this he is given a crash course in martial arts in a manner that would be great if it were possible today (I can imagine the ads - "Learn Kung-Fu in thirty seconds....no philosophising necessary!") .
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "thematrixhasme5" on 7 Dec 2003
Format: DVD
Someone once asked me how I could watch The Matrix so many times and why I haven't got bored of it.
She couldn't understand, mainly because she has only seen about 3 min of the film but my answer was "It'll never bore me because everytime you watch it you learn or notice something new". That is it.
The Matrix is such a delicious movie that leaves you wanting more and more and the more you get the more you love it. I have probably seen the film about 20 times since watching it for the first time last May. The special effects are mind blowing (and in my opinion better that Reloaded and Revolutions), the story is unforgetable, the outfits are cool as ice, and the music rocks (I've also got the soundtrack).
My fave character has to be Trinity because she is so independant and single minded. She is also so bloody lucky to snog Keanu.
They can make as many sequels as they want but nothing can compare to The Matrix chapter 1. It is The One movie.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ian Inniss on 1 Feb 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The Matrix is possibly one of the most influential and important films of the 20th Century and absolutely had to be told before we entered the 21st Century. It touches throughout on a very high level Buddhist teaching on 'emptiness', 'the-nature-of-mind' and creating your own reality.

It uses communist theory as a brilliant diagnostic tool for forming an allegory on the excesses of free market capitalism and its persistent need to de-skill humans to generate wealth for those at very top of society to remain in power.

It speaks of the control mechanisms privileged segments of society continually use to deny resources to the majority, predict consequential behaviour and the agencies they use to construct the propaganda model and enforce barriers.

It raises questions on the challenge we have to face to reconcile efficiencies afforded through automation on the one hand and the perpetual reduction of human capital on the other - it's a call to action for the millions in Western economies who will soon to be disenfranchised -

While at the same time if offers a running commentary on societal empowerment by digital disruption and the need to think toward empowering innovations for humans to satisfactorily enrich and promote the existence of the person, above the purely profit incentive and makes a clear distinction between those who believe social outcomes arrive by a few people at the top of society, from social value coming from below; with people taking revolutionary action on their own.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Anders on 18 July 2007
Format: DVD
The title of this review is a question I've heard asked quite a few times in conversations, normally asked in one of those Bill & Ted 'Whoa Dude!...' voices. And it illustrates something about this film, like it or not, it's one of those movies everyone has seen, say what you want about it but this thing is undeniably HUGE. This status sadly often means it gets either five-star reviews because everyone loves it or one star reviews because critics are trying to be arty and against the grain (by the way both previous comments refer to critics only, I haven't read enough of the amazon reviews to comment on them).
So, onto the review. This is a philosophical sci-fi action thriller with a noirish edge and religious themes. Interestingly it manages to balance all these elements in such a way that the film takes on something of a multi-layered nature, allowing you to watch it from any number or combination of stances and still love it from every one. It has stunning action sequences, a gritty cyberpunk sci-fi story and some seriously deep monologues (normally courtesy of Laurence Fishburne's smooth tones), which of these you pay attention to is entirely up to you, but watch them all and you'll get something pretty close to a sensory overload.
As far as action goes, this was absolutely revolutionary and still holds its own against the best of them (including its own massively inferior sequels). This isn't realistic, it's just cool. Slow-motion gun battles merge into wushu-esque acrobatics which merge into incredibly choreographed wire fighting martial arts.
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