Mary and Max 2009

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Existing LOVEFiLM member? Switch account

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

(112) IMDb 8.2/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

A tale of friendship between two unlikely pen pals: Mary, a lonely, eight-year-old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, and Max, a forty-four-year old, severely obese man living in New York.

Starring:
Bethany Whitmore, Toni Collette
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_12_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 28 minutes
Starring Bethany Whitmore, Toni Collette, Eric Bana, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Barry Humphries, Michael Ienna
Director Adam Elliot
Genres Comedy, Drama
Studio ELEVATION SALES
Rental release 24 January 2011
Main languages yiddish, English

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 10 April 2010
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This movie is a good old-fashioned animated story about an ostracized Australian girl and an American with undiagnosed Asperger syndrome. The story revolves around the letters they sent each other, a dialogue that began when the girl chose an american name at random to ask where babies come from. As the story evolves Mary grows up and Max descends into his syndrome. Weird as it may sound, this movie is both fun and touching. It's also one I gladly see again.

I'd say you'd have to be at least on your way to be a "grown up" to enjoy it, several scenes in the movie are in the category "difficult to explain to children".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By dick harden on 27 July 2011
Format: DVD
I expected this to be not very good, normally I am a bit bored by animations, though I do like Nick Park and The Wrong Trousers.

What I got was an unexpected gem in this film that made me cry. How many animations can do that unless you cry easily?

This is about a girl who lives in Australia. She is very lonely, with a drunken detached mother and equally uninvolved father. She is bullied and her only friend seems to be her little dog.

So, she picks a random name from the phone book, and lands on Max Horowitz from New York, and sets out to be his pen friend.

She chooses well, because Max is 40, and equally lonely. They both have unhappy lives, and it's painful and touching to watch.

Max, far, far, far from being a perv or writing anything remotely creepy (although rather candid), is so happy to hear from Mary, and he takes time to write her back, loads, about his life, and the rest.

They are both totally honest with each other, which is refreshing in this day and age of internet profile pages full of lies and superficiality, and neither wants something from the other apart from a friend.

Mary sends him a bright red pom pom (she always puts treats in with her letters, which is also touching), and Max wears it from the moment he receives it.

On so many levels you'd write off the fact a 40 year old lonely man who is writing a young girl as wrong or creepy, but this film just manages to make it nothing but touching, not an easy task in this day of 'everyone you don't know is a paedo' mentality.

The film reminds us that people can be good, that adults can be kind to young people without having some dirty ulterior motive, and also, that no matter how bad it gets, and life can get really bad, that there is always some small reason to keep on, some hope.

Films like this renew my faith in people, and what more can you ask for?

Beautiful, touching, funny, and flawless.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By OJ Skillman-Wilson on 5 Jun. 2010
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I saw this film at the bradford animation festival before it was released on blu-ray and this is what i thought at the time and is still true now.
also if you're worried it wont play on a UK Blu Ray player, it will. it played fine on my PS3.

"That night the first feature was screened- "Mary & Max". It blew my mind, the naive perspective of the child allows the audience to connect with the emotional journey of the films two main characters. Thats the beauty of animation, Mary & Max could handle the themes of mental illness in such a way that it was comic, but not mocking, and powerful, but not preachy. An authentic representation of day to day worries but displayed in the context of an entire lifetime. The narrative cleverly jumps around between the two characters and their pasts through the letters they exchange and the dialogue of each overlaid on the flashbacks. A thing of beauty. Another australian film, from melbourne this time. So many Australian animations, French too."

please watch this, its very very good. dont be fooled by the medium though, this is for adults.

Olly
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Gumble on 25 Oct. 2010
Format: DVD
In recent years there has been a rapid decline in the output of clay animation films. This would appear to be due to the huge increase in CGI animation films from Hollywood, such as Wall E (Andrew Stanton,2008), Up (Pete Docter and Bob Peterson, 2009) and Toy Story 3 (Lee Unkrich, 2010) to name but a few. The highly polished, glossy sheen of these films seems to have made the homemade, hand-crafted aesthetic of clay animation a thing of the past. Not, that I am criticising the above mentioned films, on the contrary, I am a huge fan of each, all three being shining examples of just how charming and moving, huge budget Hollywood CGI movies can be when placed in the right hands. However, it is still saddening to see such an imbalance of animation styles on our screens these days.

Thankfully, Adam Elliot's latest clay animation or `clayography' Mary and Max goes someway to redress this balance. A film of astonishing beauty, Mary and Max is undoubtedly one of THE films of the year. Taking place over the course of twenty years and spanning two continents, the film follows the relationship of pen pals Mary, an eight year old child from Australia, and Max, a forty four year old Jewish man living in New York, suffering from Aspergers syndrome. Through this relationship, Elliot explores the film's central themes of loneliness, mental illness, love and friendship, all with a deft balance of humour, sadness and subtlety.

Firstly, the clay animation is absolutely impeccable. With an aesthetic that is deceptively child-like, one could easily overlook just how painstaking a process the animation in Mary and Max must have been. This is certainly to the animators and director's credit, as the style is never too showy or distracting from the unfolding story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again