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Martin Lukes: Who Moved My BlackBerry? Paperback – 29 Jun 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (29 Jun 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141020547
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141020549
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.3 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 500,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

A brilliant satire of modern corporate life ... the Alan Partridge of the corporate world (Daily Telegraph)

Enormously funny, touching ... should become an instant classic (Financial Times)

Acutely and hilariously observed. The very best satire (Evening Standard)

Sends up the laughable business practices that have taken hold of our offices (Metro)

Hilarious (Sunday Times)

About the Author

Lucy Kellaway is the FT's management columnist. She lives in London and is married with four children.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
I'm jotting down a few key facts re myself, so that we'll be able to hit the ground running when we have our first CoachworX session on Wednesday. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Aug 2005
Format: Hardcover
It has been said that business leaders are distorting language for propaganda more than at anyone since the Soviets. For years, Lucy Kellaway has been writing about management gobbledygook and fads with insight, wit, and precision. Martin Lukes is almost more effective, in that it comes in the form of hugely entertaining, hilarious fiction.
Martin Lukes presents a year's worth of emails written by the personification of the high flying, management theory victim. Helped by career and lifestyle coach Pandora, Martin applies all imaginable lingo and management techniques to both his job and family. The trouble is that all of it is divorced from reality, and doesn't help with the problems bursting forth on all fronts.

Half the fun is guessing - or knowing - what trouble each email is going to bring to the self-obsessed and self-important Martin. He gets up to more than his share of hanky panky, and all his messes come together dramatically for maximum humour.

Martin Lukes is certainly a perfect book to take on summer holiday.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By KatieSmiles on 20 Aug 2006
Format: Hardcover
Much as I felt that I'd aligned my personal values with those of my life brand, if you will, this book offered me a paradigm shift that helped me brainstorm a mindmap for an innovative, integrity-based reappraisal. Definitely 22.5 per cent better than the bestest book I've read before.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Simon Withers on 22 Jan 2006
Format: Hardcover
I once read a book (Beyond Beef by Jeremy Rifkin) that claimed the level of bovine excreta was becoming a danger to the planet’s environment. Lucy Kellaway is a journalist who has long been concerned about this problem in the corporate environment.
Her creation, Martin Lukes, is well known to readers of the Financial Times. He’s an arrogant, selfish, self-obsessed, insecure and ambitious marketing director in the London office of a fictitious Fortune 500 company. By publishing a collection of his emails each week, she allows us to follow his rollercoaster career and personal life, and his adoption of every corporate and marketing fad that comes along.
Martin Lukes compensates for his limited intelligence and talent with unbounded ambition. His relentless clawing up the corporate pole and poor judgement often lead to disaster, but somehow he survives and moves forward.
We all know at least one Martin Lukes. That is why the column has proved to be both compelling and amusing. Lucy Kellaway, through Martin, also introduces us to a collection of recognisable corporate and domestic characters, and fires round after round into the mumbo-jumbo that passes for strategy and public relations in some companies. I mainly cringed, often smiled and sometimes laughed out loud while reading her book.
“Who Moved My Blackberry” is a reworking of Martin Luke’s weekly emails into a 13 month December to December book which, like a diary, tells the story of his life over a year. For those who read the weekly column in the FT, it could be a little too much. Whereas one column is an amusing weekly read in an otherwise dry newspaper, nearly 400 pages in book form is probably a bit much.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Stuart Lindsay on 12 Aug 2006
Format: Paperback
I loved this book, I loved it so much it almost goes down in history as one of my quickest ever reads. This could be due to a few things, icluding:

The fact that the book is written entirely in email format, and being an office email it is always good fun and interesting to see things evolve through someone elses email.

There is a lot going on this book, and imagination is key, as you get minimal background, and you have to do a lot of gap filling, but although the book is full of story the gap's are easy to fill, but I think that is half the fun.

A quick, easy, brainless read!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Robins on 11 July 2005
Format: Hardcover
I am halfway through reading this book and am gripped by the stomach-churning character of Martin Lukes, a man who demonstrates the worst characteristics of your least-favourite office colleagues. Martin has a monumental ego which tramples all resistance to his schemes for self-advancement. He soaks up management-speak like a sponge, and regurgitates it to hilarious effect. A great summer read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. H. R. Cornell on 1 Aug 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
We follow the story of a life in the year of Martin Lukes a senior director in a mythical company A-B Global.
The story is told by emails from his pc and his blackberry. Clearly email is Martin chosen method of commuication as he uses this with everyone, from colleagues to his personal life coach to his family, even his elderly mother.
Whilst being painfully funny, it does make you look at what the emails you send, in the same way that The Office made you look at the way you behave in the office environment.
I will be buying the FT every Thursday to catch up with Martin's emails on a weekly basis.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By maurice@opendoors-newbusiness.co.uk on 22 Aug 2006
Format: Paperback
I know alot of people say "e" the original book in this genre was better but I say this one is not half bad and very funny in places. Anything that aims to prick pompous management speak can only be a good thing - goodness knows Im full of it! Also nicely highlights the rampant politics and agressive self advancement that seem to dominate any office with more than 2-3 people! Enjoy! -Maurice
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