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Martial Arts Teachers on Teaching Paperback – 11 Sep 1995


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Product details

  • Paperback: 228 pages
  • Publisher: North Atlantic Books,U.S.; 1st Thus edition (11 Sep 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1883319099
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883319090
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 1.8 x 22.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,085,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Individuals begin the study of martial arts for as many reasons as there are students. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 July 1998
Format: Paperback
Wiley has collected essays from 26 teachers/practitioners (six men, 20 women)of a wide variety of martial arts. In addition to the essays, the book includes an extensive bibliography of books on and about the martial arts.
The backgrounds of the contributors are as diverse as their martial arts styles, and each has been allowed to develop his/her essay in quite personal and individual ways. The disadvantage of this approach is a lack of uniformity among the essays. For me, though, this is greatly outweighed by the advantage of being able to glean from a single book a wonderful diversity of resources to bring to my own martial arts practice and teaching.
Some essays focus on very practical aspects of teaching: how to begin a karate course in a college or university setting; how to develop self-defense courses for audiences ranging from victims of violence to law enforcement professionals; how to keep drop-out rates among beginning students low; and more. Others address more "theoretical" aspects of martial arts pedagogy (differences in learning style and how to accomodate them; differences between teaching children and adults; etc.); still others describe the effects martial arts teaching has had on those who teach it. I can't imagine a serious teacher (or student, for that matter!) of any martial arts discipline failing to take away valuable insights -- and not just once, but every time s/he returns to the book. This will definitely be a resource I continue to use for years, and I recommend it heartily.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Margarita FM on 2 Sep 2009
Format: Paperback
I was looking for a book on teaching methodology for Martial Arts, especially in reference to the differences between the Chinese methodology and that applied in teaching in the West. As this is a series of articles written by a variety of Martial Arts teachers I was able to glean bits and pieces from almost all the articles that were of use to me. Even though all the instructors teach in the USA, variety is the key word as every teacher had a different approach, as it should be, and the articles were written in many different styles. Everybody who reads this will find something useful. But if you are looking for an academic treatise you'll need to look elsewhere.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By P. T. Grey on 14 Mar 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a professional Instructor - I had high hopes for this book - I was disappointed. The title is misleading as the book appears geared toward women in the martial arts.

I had expected a collection of observations or essays written by serious - long term martial artists/masters on their arts - their teaching and their experience. What I got was a book that was well crafted, but essentially aimed at women. The instructors were predominatly hobbyists rather than individuals who lived their training and there was no one there who appeared to have "walked the walk" and actually needed martial arts training.

The book features (I think) 25 essays written by a 21 female instructors and 4 male instructors. Whilst it is interesting to read about training from a female instructors perspective, (which is definatley different to a male perspective) I felt the book was aimed more at women than men. There was also a subtle feminist message in the text - again I am ok with this but did not expect a book with this title to have that kind of focus.

The essays were well written but very much aimed at the whole "peacefull warrior". I felt the book lacked balance and would have benefited from some a wider range of instructors - half male and perhaps looked outside of the traditional arts especially past Tai Chi - aikido, taekwon do.

In short - for me this was an opportunity lost or at least a book with a misleading title.

In short I would reccomend this book for female martial artists - it approaches gender issues well and suggests an approach to deal with sexism experienced by female martial artists.

However if you are looking for keen insites from teachers with a lifetime of applied martial arts experience from individuals with experience of 'fighting arts' look elsewhere.

To Quote John Graden, this book appears aimed at "Pooh Bears" of the martial arts community.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Terry Tozer on 19 April 2009
Format: Paperback
You could be completely forgiven for being left confused deciding on which review above best describes the attributes of this book. Talk about chalk & cheese. I hope you'll instantly recognise which of the last two reviews is telling the truth & thus which is the more 'professional' of the two?

Just to set the record straight - this book is written by a long standing & widely experienced martial artist & teacher. For someone to have gone to such great expense, time & trouble to gather together & compile such a unique work immediately sets this title in a good light.

We're not just talking about one persons perspective, we're listening to the distilled knowledge & wisdom of 26 twenty six contributors, all from different backgrounds & styles! Some of which are, Kung-fu, H-singi, Tae Kwon do, different styles of karate, self defence, Aikido, Hapkido & Tai Chi amongst many others.

Yes, out of the 26 stories, eight of them are from male instructors & teachers, a ratio of more than 3 to 1 I admit, but so what? What does it matter what gender you are? It's the quality, quantity & usefulness of the information that's important. All of the writers here are experienced & each has a valid perspective on teaching.

In my humble opinion, Carol Wiley has been very 'professional' in her deciding which authors to include & has compiled this book so expertly as the information in this book is going to be a boon for any martial arts instructor of any style.

Her contributors deal with for example how to recognise & teach different types of student, be they a visual, auditory or kinaesthetic learner or whether that student perceives information globally or analytically.
Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Tips, insights, and musings on teaching martial arts 5 July 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Wiley has collected essays from 26 teachers/practitioners (six men, 20 women)of a wide variety of martial arts. In addition to the essays, the book includes an extensive bibliography of books on and about the martial arts.
The backgrounds of the contributors are as diverse as their martial arts styles, and each has been allowed to develop his/her essay in quite personal and individual ways. The disadvantage of this approach is a lack of uniformity among the essays. For me, though, this is greatly outweighed by the advantage of being able to glean from a single book a wonderful diversity of resources to bring to my own martial arts practice and teaching.
Some essays focus on very practical aspects of teaching: how to begin a karate course in a college or university setting; how to develop self-defense courses for audiences ranging from victims of violence to law enforcement professionals; how to keep drop-out rates among beginning students low; and more. Others address more "theoretical" aspects of martial arts pedagogy (differences in learning style and how to accomodate them; differences between teaching children and adults; etc.); still others describe the effects martial arts teaching has had on those who teach it. I can't imagine a serious teacher (or student, for that matter!) of any martial arts discipline failing to take away valuable insights -- and not just once, but every time s/he returns to the book. This will definitely be a resource I continue to use for years, and I recommend it heartily.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
A fascinating read. 22 Oct 2003
By L. A. Kane - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are some real gems in here. Carol A. Wiley interviews a good cross-section of martial arts instructors and portrays their collective wisdom in an entertaining and fast-paced style. If you teach martial arts, you'll want to read this. Couple cool quotes from the book:

"Kids love to compare and compete, and they especially love calling attention to each other's mistakes. I frequently have to remind them that I am the teacher and their job is to concentrate on their own improvement, without worrying about anyone else's... From the student's point of view, the problem is that the mind is quicker than the body - and the mouth is quicker than the mind." - Didi Goodman Sensei, Chief Instructor, Cuong Nhu Redwood Dojo.

"Traditional schools emphasize self-improvement and self-realization as the primary goal, with "not losing" (in an actual fight) a result of sincere training. Modern tournament schools emphasize being better than others, that is winning (and displaying) trophies. Fun is not the purpose of traditional karate-do; the development of good character is. To the extent that one has ego-centered fun at the expense of others, one has left the realm of self-improvement behind and sown the seeds of self-destruction. On the other hand, training cannot be distasteful. It has the rewards of happiness, fascination, satisfaction, and even humor, and it is on this feedback that the instructor and the club will succeed or fail." - Dr. Elmar T. Schmeisser Sensei, American Teacher's Association of the Martial Arts (ATAMA).

Lawrence Kane
Author of Surviving Armed Assaults, The Way of Kata, and Martial Arts Instruction
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
It Does Exactly What it Says on the Lable!! 19 April 2009
By Terry Tozer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
You could be completely forgiven for being left confused deciding on which review above best describes the attributes of this book. Talk about chalk & cheese. I hope you'll instantly recognise which of the last two reviews is telling the truth & thus which is the more 'professional' of the two? (N.B: these references are made in response to a negative review on the Amazon.co.uk site)

Just to set the record straight - this book is written by a long standing & widely experienced martial artist & teacher. For someone to have gone to such great expense, time & trouble to gather together & compile such a unique work immediately sets this title in a good light.

We're not just talking about one persons perspective, we're listening to the distilled knowledge & wisdom of 26 twenty six contributors, all from different backgrounds & styles! Some of which are, Kung-fu, H-singi, Tae Kwon do, different styles of karate, self defence, Aikido, Hapkido & Tai Chi amongst many others.

Yes, out of the 26 stories, eight of them are from male instructors & teachers, a ratio of more than 3 to 1 I admit, but so what? What does it matter what gender you are? It's the quality, quantity & usefulness of the information that's important. All of the writers here are experienced & each has a valid perspective on teaching.

In my humble opinion, Carol Wiley has been very 'professional' in her deciding which authors to include & has compiled this book so expertly as the information in this book is going to be a boon for any martial arts instructor of any style.

Her contributors deal with for example how to recognise & teach different types of student, be they a visual, auditory or kinaesthetic learner or whether that student perceives information globally or analytically. The differences & difficulties between teaching male, female or mixed classes & the challenges that teaching children can pose.

Interspersed throughout the book are pictures of students & teachers during their lessons.

No matter whether you've just started your own martial arts club or have been teaching many years, you will fair much better by delving into the hundreds of years of valuable experiences within these pages. Why re-invent the wheel when you can learn so much from other people's mistakes & problems that they have successfully overcome.

The shining beauty of this book is that its authorship is so diverse, not from one style, person or culture.

I found it difficult to put down due to the varied nature of each contributors style of writing & points of view. The variety it offers makes it very balanced on the whole. This is a serious text & there is nothing naïve or `pooh bear' about it. Equally, there is nothing misleading about the title either, `it does exactly what it says on the label'! As for John Graden, it seems strange to me that no one has bothered to expend any time on reviewing any of his books - the silence speaks volumes.

There aren't many other titles around, but you may also be interested in John Graybeals book on The Art of Empowering Children: A Karate Masters Secrets or a very good title by Lawrence Kane called Martial Arts Instruction: Applying Educational Theory and Communication Techniques. Sang Kims book called Teaching Martial Arts: The Way of the Master is about the only other decent book I could possibly recommend.

This book is a very uplifting & positive book full of hard earned wisdom & inspiration.
hard read 22 Mar 2014
By CORY FREDERICK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
a good collection of essays... However, some articles seem a bit to right-wing feminist but still hold value in teaching concepts. Essays vary in topic and give contrasting views, and most are generic in approach to accomidate all arts. main problem is it's a slow read, not very interesting...
Multidementional book on martial art experiences 12 Sep 2011
By Tai Chi Man - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A facinating look at martial arts by experienced teachers including Helen Nakano, a fantastic naginata teacher who spread naginata to the USA, Elizbeth Kennedy who is a major self defense teacher, and Harvey Kurland a well known tai chi chuan teacher and writer for Inside Kungfu magazine.

Symmetrical Yang Style T'ai-Chi Ch'uan Vol. 1: The First 10 Movements of the 28 Form
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