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Mars Polaris Import


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Product details

  • Audio CD (27 July 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Tangerine Dream Intl
  • ASIN: B00000JKE0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 345,618 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Comet's Figure Head
2. Rim Of Schiaparelli
3. Pilots Of The Ether Belt
4. Deep Space Cruiser
5. Outland (The Colony)
6. Spiral Star Date (Level P)
7. Mars Mission Counter
8. Astrophobia
9. Tharsis Maneuver
10. Dies Martis (TransMercury)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 April 2001
Building on some of the promising, subtle textures and sounds of the much-underrated "Transsiberia", "Mars Polaris" is symbolic of the accomplishment and imagination with which the Edgar & Jerome Frose partnership now operates, after some bad patches in the late 80s and early 90s. The band's musical innovation has not remained static, and consequently this album boasts a variety of fresh sounds and new structures.
"Comet's Figure Head" begins with some atmospheric chords, followed by the compelling and sophisticated development of a simple motif into an almost anthemic melody that does indeed evoke the freedom and emptiness of outer space. "Rim of Schiaparelli" is a more rhythmic affair, with a variety of musical interjections decorating a nicely developing sequencer line. The only minus is the reapperance - slightly unnerving if you are a long-term follower of the Dream - of the "harpsichord hit" sound, nice but overused since the late 80s. But although this sound reappears occasionally throughout the album, its use is measured and in a suitably accomplished context.
"Pilots of the Ether Belt" picks up where the previous piece left off, with more percussion and sequencer work creating a rather satisfying ten-minute journey through the cold, tranquil wonders of space. "Deep Space Cruiser", in a nicely arranged counterpoint to the lengthy exploration of the previous tracks, is essentially a crisp guitar piece against a percussive background, which, although unremarkable as a single track, works well in the context of the album.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By F. M. Havicon on 4 Jun 2012
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
I've always regarded this as something of a milestone album for the Dream, as it dealt a final death blow to genuine creativity and embarked them upon a 20 years phase of their musical career in which they kept recording the same track over and over again. Prior to this there had been a run of "jazzy" albums like Rockoon and Tyranny of Beauty, the band were in a sort of musical dolldrums and awaiting new direction: it came with this album, a recycling of old sequencer patterns and drumparts, familar chord progressions, uninspiring melodies, and a very limited soundbank. Some investigative work reveals that much of this album, and those to follow, was actually the solo work of Edgar Froese, sometimes helped out by son Jerome, occasionally visited in the studio by Linda Spa, or whoever he felt like hiring at the time. Tangerine Dream had become a brand, a commodity. You needn't buy any more of their albums released after this one, they all sound exactly the same, though their very much more recent stuff has picked up a bit thankfully. Also avoid the album Mars Mission Counter, which is simply this album with a few remixed drumparts, dressed up as an original. Technically brilliant, but creatively a damp squib.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Casley TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Feb 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Only Edgar and Jerome Froese are credited on the group's 1999 CD `Mars Polaris', subtitled `Deep Space Highway to Red Rocks Pavilion'. I note that the longest track on my CD is seven minutes, but TD fan sites indicate that the original version of this CD included some tracks over ten minutes in length.

This is pertinent for me, since I have long lamented the group's switch to predominantly short pieces that end just as they might start to build up some headway. The set on this CD again comprises what are, to me, short sketches that progress on a whim rather than completed landscapes; they are like Turner watercolours, constructions with no clear edges; there is only a little structural delineation.

And yet repeated playing of the set reveal that each track is precisely arranged. There is again a lack of melody; the pieces progress in small changes made to bland thematic ideas, as if arranged and programmed by computer. Virtually all tracks are keyboard-led, with no guitar solos and guitar work felt only here and there, save for `Dies Martis' with its odd Celtic feel.

`Pilots of the Ether Belt' has a welcome depth, even some pathos, and `Mars Mission' (by Edgar F) has a nice idea that is alas undeveloped. However, his son Jerome does appear to pick up on it in the following `Astrophobia'. The worse tracks are at the CD's heart: `Outland' is a mere concatenation of chord sequences supporting a weak weedy pseudo-clarinet, whilst `Spiral Star Date' is simply ponderous.

In conclusion, this CD had a good premise in addressing the excitement and inspiration of a Mars Mission, but alas its expectations are unfulfilled. It could have been much better. However, eight of the ten tracks here do have an intricacy and depth that merit repeated listenings. Hence the four stars.
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