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Mark of the Beast: The Continuing Story of the Spear of Destiny [Paperback]

Trevor Ravenscroft , Tim Wallace-Murphy , T. Walace-Murphy
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
RRP: 16.99
Price: 14.14 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

1 Jun 1997
Describes the occult power of the spear which pierced the side of Christ, and how it can be used to understand personal destiny. The authors argue that this is the age of the anti-Christ, and that the spear is the symbol of the coming millennium of change.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Frequently Bought Together

Mark of the Beast: The Continuing Story of the Spear of Destiny + Spear of Destiny: The Occult Power Behind the Spear Which Pierced the Side of Christ + Cup of Destiny
Price For All Three: 46.22

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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Red Wheel/Weiser; New edition edition (1 Jun 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877288704
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877288701
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 14 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 228,069 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The solitary iron spearhead black with age still rests on a faded red velvet dais within an open leather case. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Get It Right! 1 Aug 2008
Format:Paperback
The author of this book was a WW2 Commando officer, whose attempt to capture Rommel failed, as shown at the start of the 50's British film The Desert Fox. After WW2, he was a British tabloid journalist (Daily Mirror). I fear that this book contains traces of both of his occupations. His obsessive and (he says, Churchillian) idea that Hitler was the first beast of the Apocalypse tends to blinker him as to other ideas or sources of evil in the world and history. Likewise, like a good Mirror journalist, he does not let the facts get in the way of a good story, as in locating the Academy of Jund-i-Shapur, which is called by Valentin Tomberg and by Ravenscroft in his earlier books, Gondishapur (and,by the Times Atlas of the World, simply "Shapur") and which is NOT "in the foothills of the Afghan mountains" but on the other side of Iran, in the Zagros Mountains close to the Gulf.

As to the identity of "the beast 666", his views reflect the confusion and wish-father-to-fact tendency all too common in this field. For example, he quotes the Book of Revelation to the effect that "...the number of the beast....is the number of a man and his number is [666]" but this simple idea can lead people into endless and fruitless fantasy. By way of example, my own full name, in terms of modern numerology, comes to a group of three numbers: 15 33 33, which is equal to 6 6 6, yet I am not (as far as I know lol!) the Beast or one of his cohorts! I feel that Ravenscroft's occult perception was unclear and led him astray, as in his earlier book The Cup of Destiny, where he claimed that from 1982 to 2001 there would be three almighty waves of destruction, after which the reincarnated Knights Templar would fight the Beast and the Great Dictator...never happened.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Between two stools 17 May 2012
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
There are ,on the one hand,serious attempts to investigate and stimulate deeper spiritual insights into our times from a background of spiritual science and there are loads of 'conspiracy-enigma-bible-code'vaguely occult journalistic books etc.on the other.Trevor Ravenscroft hoped I think to span the gap between these genres.On the one hand he wanted to be seen as a serious anthroposohical researcher into Karma and reincarnation,and he wanted also to get a general public interested in stuff they usualy sleep through.I first read this book and both the 'Spear'Spear of Destiny: The Occult Power Behind the Spear Which Pierced the Side of Christand 'Cup'of Destiny years ago,and this book is in a way the most perplexing of the three.
First,it is not clear to me which author is speaking as I read.Second there are some very interesting parts ,notably the personal experiences of discovery at Rosslyn and Cintra which make a lot of sense,alternating with a kind of spiritual instruction or personal advice which is either more or less rehashed Steiner or in parts lifted almost verbatim from Steiner's books.(To my mind nothing does Steiner more harm than people rattling on about superior moral attainments and practices as if they themselves were truly masters of this stuff but are actually paraphrasing Steiner who almost certainly was but never said so in those words..Third there are lots of assertions eg about the academy of Jundhi Shapur and what happened there etc. which seem to come from thin air.(in the whole book anyway you will not find footnotes or references.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Cat's Out of the Bag 7 Oct 2011
By Orca
Format:Paperback
An interesting read, but the game was up when I discovered that the basic premise was that the Anti-Christ would rise to prominence in 2000. Duh!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Cloud Of Half-Knowing? 28 July 2008
Format:Paperback
The books of the WW2 British Commando officer (he tried to capture Rommel at one of his North African villa headquarters, but the mission failed and he was taken prisoner; cf. the 1950's British film "The Desert Fox") and tabloid journalist(Daily Mirror) are never less than interesting. I myself was fascinated by his "The Spear of Destiny" when I first read it around 1979 or thereabouts. I even went to see the supposed actual Spear ("Heilige Lance") when I happened to be in Vienna in the 1980's.

This book is a damn good read but should be taken, at least in part, with a pinch of salt, like his earlier books (eg, "The Cup of Destiny", wherein Ravenscroft claimed that from, I think, 1981, the world would suffer three great waves of apocalyptic destruction leading up to the year 2000. Never happened...).

OK, then, this book: Ravenscroft mentions the Academy at Jund-i-Shapur in Iran (in his other books referred to as Gondishapur; the Times Atlas of the World has the site as, simply, Shapur). Ravenscroft says more than once that it was in the foothills of the mountains of Afghanistan, but this is not so, because the site is in fact on the other side of Iran, the SW part of the country, in the Zagros Mountains, about 70 miles from the Gulf. So that is a basic fact wrong.

As to Ravenscroft's attempts to deal with the whole question of the "Antichrist", the so-called "Great Dictator" etc, it seems to me that it is easy to go off on tangents and into illusions when dealing with these matters. For example, when considering "...the number of a man and his number is [666]" delusions are almost guaranteed.
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