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Marianne Faithfull Paperback – 13 May 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Omnibus Press (13 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780388373
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780388373
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 447,365 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Mark Hodkinson has written for The Times for the past 15 years, three years as a columnist. He has also contributed to The Observer, The Guardian, Mail on Sunday, Word, GQ and others.

He wrote, produced and presented 'In Search of Barney Bubbles', a biography of the seminal album sleeve artist, broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2012 and 'Walter Kershaw: Britain's First Street Artist?' broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2012. He presented and co-wrote 'A Tale Of Two Villages' broadcast on Radio 4 in January 2013.

Mark has written several books on rock music, including 'As Years Go By', a biography of Marianne Faithfull, and 'Thank Yer, Very Glad', a biography of the indie band, The Wedding Present.

He has written five well-received sports books. 'Believe in the Sign' was chosen as one of the sports books of the year by both The Guardian and The Times and was long-listed for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year award in 2007. His debut novel, 'The Last Mad Surge of Youth' was Q's novel of the year in 2010. He edited the much-acclaimed 'JD Salinger: A Life Raised High', a biography of author famous for 'Catcher In The Rye'.

Mark played guitar in Untermensch, The Monkey Run and The Last Peach, supporting bands such as The Stone Roses, Pulp, The Wedding Present and The Chameleons. He has released two albums with Black September, an ad hoc grouping of friends. He owns Pomona Books (www.pomonauk.co.uk), an independent publishing house, and has published titles by Simon Armitage, Barry Hines, Ian McMillan, Ray Gosling, Stuart Murdoch (of Belle and Sebastian) and many more.

Product Description

About the Author

Mark Hodkinson is an acclaimed journalist, author and broadcaster. He has written for The Times for many years, three as a columnist, and made several radio documentaries for BBC Radio 4. He owns the independent publishing house, Pomona Books.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Mar 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Marianne Faithfull has been represented (or rather misrepresented) for many years – her life story a scenario of rumour, scandal and gossip. The stunningly beautiful young singer, the lover of rock stars, the junkie, the actress and the mother. She has fulfilled many roles, and lived many lives, but in this account the author attempts to look past the media glare and discover the truth about the life of Marianne Faithfull.

This book looks in detail at her childhood and her parents. When Marianne first met Andrew Loog Oldham and he asked her to record for him without ever hearing her sing – knowing he could sell that look – she was portrayed as an innocent convent school girl. Indeed, she did have a Catholic education, although she also had a bohemian upbringing and was, even as a child, often called precocious and arrogant. Much of this masked an unsure shyness. However, Marianne was keen to throw herself into Swinging London and from her early meetings with John Dunbar – who she later married and who was the father of her son, Nicholas – and Oldham, she embarked on her career. John Dunbar was certainly one of the Sixties beautiful people. He ran the Indica bookshop, alongside Barry Miles (central to London counter-culture) and both were close friends of Peter Asher, brother of Jane and boyfriend of Paul McCartney. Obviously, Andrew Loog Oldham was, at that time, manager of the Rolling Stones, so she was immediately in the very centre of the musical and artistic world at that moment.

Of course, much of this book takes place in the Sixties and, indeed, the public perception of her has been defined through that era.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By BB on 17 Aug 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Like many other people, I never took much serious notice of Marianne Faithful until she released her absolutely brilliant Broken English album in 1979. Until then, I always looked upon her as Mick Jagger's former girlfriend and a one-hit-wonder with As Tears Go By. However, no matter how good Broken English was I could never see me reading her biography.

What changed was reading author, Mark Hodkinson's other work in particular his novel, The Last Mad Surge of Youth which was simply superb. Until I had read it I hadn't realised that he's a famous football author whose many books I had already read over the years, a chronicler of both Queen and Simply Red and a columnist for The Times. What a talented bloke!

The book itself is a really well-researched journal of Marianne's crazy life. She's obviously got a superb personality to be able to keep so many superstar friends for so long (and for them to provide her with her keep) but Jesus Christ almighty, she's frustrating. If I have a criticism of this book it's that Hodkinson doesn't ever explore what drives her to constant self-destruction.

Quite a lot of the book understandably focuses on the Swinging Sixties in general and the Stones in particular. As the author points out, Marianne was somebody indelibly associated with that period but was only 24 years old at the end of the decade. Everybody who was anyone was absolutely besotted with her and it seems that she went to bed with most of them. The Hollies wrote their great hit Carrie Anne about her but Graham Nash was too shy to write Marianne and so changed the name. Allan Clarke was having an affair with her on tour at the time.
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By Sooey on 23 Sep 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very interesting and well written book. A good read for anybody who is nostalgic for the 60s and 70s.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
As Years Go By 19 Mar 2014
By S Riaz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Marianne Faithfull has been represented (or rather misrepresented) for many years – her life story a scenario of rumour, scandal and gossip. The stunningly beautiful young singer, the lover of rock stars, the junkie, the actress and the mother. She has fulfilled many roles, and lived many lives, but in this account the author attempts to look past the media glare and discover the truth about the life of Marianne Faithfull.

This book looks in detail at her childhood and her parents. When Marianne first met Andrew Loog Oldham and he asked her to record for him without ever hearing her sing – knowing he could sell that look – she was portrayed as an innocent convent school girl. Indeed, she did have a Catholic education, although she also had a bohemian upbringing and was, even as a child, often called precocious and arrogant. Much of this masked an unsure shyness. However, Marianne was keen to throw herself into Swinging London and from her early meetings with John Dunbar – who she later married and who was the father of her son, Nicholas – and Oldham, she embarked on her career. John Dunbar was certainly one of the Sixties beautiful people. He ran the Indica bookshop, alongside Barry Miles (central to London counter-culture) and both were close friends of Peter Asher, brother of Jane and boyfriend of Paul McCartney. Obviously, Andrew Loog Oldham was, at that time, manager of the Rolling Stones, so she was immediately in the very centre of the musical and artistic world at that moment.

Of course, much of this book takes place in the Sixties and, indeed, the public perception of her has been defined through that era. Her very public relationship with Mick Jagger, the Redlands drugs bust, her overdose in Australia and her gradual immersion in the drugs scene are all covered here in great detail. It is interesting to read that while the Sixties – and indeed the Seventies – are often criticised for being very sexist, it was not just men whose attitudes were defined by the era they grew up in. When Mick Jagger, still a very young man, faced his first night in prison, he broke down in front of Marianne. This was not a time in when men showed their feelings and Marianne was unable to comfort her distressed boyfriend, and, indeed, was rather harsh about his emotional state. It is clear that, in later years, she was aware that she had behaved rather badly towards him and, also, it is obvious that, even now, the two are still fond of each other.

This is certainly not just about the Sixties however. The rather sad period in the 1970’s is covered, when Marianne’s drug dependence grew and she lived an unsettled and difficult existence. Her many relationships, her acting and her music career are all examined. Despite all her problems, her friends have always seemed to care for her deeply and try to help her. Often her own behaviour has been so self destructive that you cannot help read about it with disbelief – there is the hilarious tale of her appearance on Saturday Night Live, for example, when a chance meeting in a hotel meant those minding her had no chance of keeping her sober during her trip. However, she has come through everything to emerge as a credible artist, with a successful career as a singer and actress. In her life she has battled dependence on drugs, trial by media, losing custody of her son, health problems and more. Yet, she has always emerged triumphant – adored by audiences and a doting grandmother, but never losing her ability to be unique. This book truly does her justice and tells her story without making it more extreme than it was; although, frankly, that would be difficult to do.
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