Margaret 2011

Amazon Instant Video

(28) IMDb 6.4/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

A 17-year-old New York City high school student feels certain that she inadvertently played a role in a traffic accident that has claimed a woman's life, and in her attempts to set things right, she learns that her youthful ideals are on a collision cours their darker sides begin to take over.

Starring:
Anna Paquin, J. Smith-Cameron
Runtime:
3 hours 6 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices

Margaret

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Kenneth Lonergan
Starring Anna Paquin, J. Smith-Cameron
Supporting actors Allison Janney, Mark Ruffalo, Matt Damon, Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno
Studio Fox Searchlight
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. B. Toth on 6 April 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
A brilliant, poignant and moving film; dialogue, cinematography and sound track all working together to great effect. Wonderful performance from Anna Paquin.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lucy Clare on 2 April 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
I don't actually want to go into, too much detail as the film speaks beautifully for itself, via the director/writers vision and the performances from both Mother and daughter especially. If you enjoy intelligent drama watch it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By prisrob TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 May 2013
Format: DVD
Kenneth Lonergan's delayed film 'Margaret' is a kind of masterpiece. The title of the film comes from a poem, 'Spring and Fall' by Gerald Manley Hopkins. This was a favorite poem by one of Lonergan's mentors, Patricia Broderick, and centers on a woman named Margaret. This is Lonergan's tribute to Broderick. Of note, Broderick's son plays a teacher in the film.

The film starts with a moving scene of the New York City landscape on a beautiful day, and suddenly we are smack dab in the middle of trauma and blood and gore. This scene is so profound and so well acted that it is etched permanently in our minds. Lisa, played by Anna Paquin, is the witness and partial cause of this incident. This will cause her hours and days and months of pain and grieving. She is a young girl, 17 years old and in the midst of growing up. She thinks she is an adult, but in reality she is still a teenager trying to move through her days. Overly dramatic, yes, but then her mother is an actress of some renown on the stage, and her father, a playwright/writer in Hollywood. The father is played by the director, Kenneth Lonergan, and he is quite believable as a loving but distracted father, off in his own world.

As the film proceeds we see Lisa as she grieves and as she tries to do the right thing. She is unable to talk with her mother about her mixed feelings of lying to protect someone, so she latches onto a teacher, played by Matt Damon, and then onto the best friend of the victim. The film gives us a perspective from all sides. We all have our version, and then we all have our morals and ethics to defend. What would I do in these circumstances? Difficult to say , a 17 year old me?

The writing is superb, the acting superb, and the film's storyline is a new side of an old theme. Well done, more than entertaining, thought provoking and insistent. A must see for everyone.

Recommended. prisrob 05-04-13
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Ian A. Macfarlane TOP 100 REVIEWER on 14 Jan 2012
Format: DVD
I'm with Dipesh Parmar in an earlier review. This fairly long film was never dull, but it did not satisfy either. Anna Paquin plays Lisa, an intelligent teenage girl with the erratic judgement of her years, feeling passionately about many things but expressing herself often in a way which angers or upsets those around her - and herself, in the end. She's prickly and self-righteous, vulnerable and aggressive.

Lisa is not an unconvincing character ; she's just not likeable. At times she is the victim of circumstances. More often she creates trouble and aggravates it. She distresses a decent boy who likes her. She frequently upsets her mother, who is herself vulnerable. She is unable to deal successfully with her absent father, with whom she would like to spend time but to whom she talks on the 'phone, usually without very much connection, and whose offer of time spent together in the end is withdrawn. There are times when you would just like to slap her which is what (metaphorically) the dead woman's friend Emily eventually does, recognising that, while Lisa has been caught up in an event which would be traumatic for anyone, she is nonetheless making a narrative of it to suit herself, sometimes at the expense of others. I should say here that Anna Paquin's characteristic expression of startled self-righteousness turning to aggression is completely convincing ; she is very good, as are all the cast. J. Smith-Cameron as her mother also deserves special mention for a very good, understatedly fragile performance.

How much of this is the result of the film's editing, from 3 hours down to 2 and a quarter? It may be that links are missing, that some scenes, played out more fully, might carry more weight, but there is no way of knowing.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video
Interesting film that looks at guilt and the feelings of responsibility. Some good performances within but at over 3 hours long the film drags slightly and feels like a self-satisfying directors project. Apparently it's release was delayed for years over funders saying that the film needed to be edited down -I totally agree with them. 30 minutes could easily be cut just by getting rid of unnecessary scenic views, or by cutting bits of conversation where extras are heard talking, before, during or after a scene. No joke their is one scene in a café where we (the viewer) overhear several conversations of extras before focussing on the main characters dialogue -its quite unnecessary and distracting.
Overall, If you like drama with purpose (pace) you might want to avoid this. However if you like character study the film may be right up your street even with its flaws.
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By R. J. Lister on 22 May 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
On the day of its cinema release, Kenneth Lonergan's long-gestating drama was the most successful film in the UK. Problem was, it only opened on one screen. The story of Margaret's production is likely a fascinating story in itself, not least because of Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker's input into the final edit, which was presumably a return favour for Lonergan's work on the screenplay for Gangs of New York. But I'll focus on the fascinating story that Lonergan has told with this film.

Ostensibly the tale centres on a New York schoolgirl named Lisa (Anna Paquin, defining her young adulthood just as she defined herself in childhood with The Piano), who inadvertently causes a fatal road accident. What follows is the emotional aftermath, fought outwardly with her mother, as a moral and ethical war wages within her hormone-ravaged body.

The performances are excellent throughout, particularly Paquin and J. Smith-Cameron as the daughter and mother caught in gravitational flux. Jean Reno gives fine support as the sad-sack Ramon, while Matthew Broderick delivers the poem (by Gerard Manley Hopkins) that provides the film's title, while suggesting the entire life of his character by the way he eats a sandwich. It's that kind of film.

I once described Winter's Bone as an anti-youth movie. Margaret could be a companion piece in this regard, cautioning against the bright-eyed naivety of youthful independence, and promoting the importance of family. Like Winter's Ree, Lisa is a lost soul; unlike Ree, Lisa is not someone we admire. But she is always in focus; Lonergan expects not for us to like her, only to understand her.
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