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Mapping the Terrain: New Public Genre Art Paperback – 9 Feb 1995


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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Bay Press,U.S. (9 Feb. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0941920305
  • ISBN-13: 978-0941920308
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 545,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Jan. 1999
Format: Paperback
In Suzanne Lacy's Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art, authors espouse continuity and responsibility through community-based public art works, collaborative practices among artists and their audiences, and the engagement of multiple audiences through empathy and appreciation. Their sense of new genre public art builds on exposure, deconstruction, and rejection of modernism's constructs and myths. Throughout these essays terms such as "community", "consensus", "truth", "good", and "multiple voices" are used to propagate a genre of public art that is dematerialized and progressive. Yet, it is not realistic to assume that consensus and community will always be progressive forces. This book raises more questions than it answers. Such as; can an artist go too far in the direction of consensus and community? Isn't there danger in not recognizing the tensions and conflicts within any group interaction (small community) for the sense of consensus (common good). Do the multiple voices include those that do not label the project "art?" Do these, and other public art projects have the potential to fall back into the modernist trap of being seen as a fraud, a hoax, or a loss of craft, in which audiences are insulted? Are these projects art because an artist was involved, and what happens to that role if the artist is simply a conduit for other voices? Can the artist speak for communities from which the artist does not belong (is it better to utilize local artists from within the communities)?
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By steve on 2 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback
Wonderful service - beautifully packed
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Raising questions about the purpose of public art. 10 Jan. 1999
By kmt127@psu.edu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In Suzanne Lacy's Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art, authors espouse continuity and responsibility through community-based public art works, collaborative practices among artists and their audiences, and the engagement of multiple audiences through empathy and appreciation. Their sense of new genre public art builds on exposure, deconstruction, and rejection of modernism's constructs and myths. Throughout these essays terms such as "community", "consensus", "truth", "good", and "multiple voices" are used to propagate a genre of public art that is dematerialized and progressive. Yet, it is not realistic to assume that consensus and community will always be progressive forces. This book raises more questions than it answers. Such as; can an artist go too far in the direction of consensus and community? Isn't there danger in not recognizing the tensions and conflicts within any group interaction (small community) for the sense of consensus (common good). Do the multiple voices include those that do not label the project "art?" Do these, and other public art projects have the potential to fall back into the modernist trap of being seen as a fraud, a hoax, or a loss of craft, in which audiences are insulted? Are these projects art because an artist was involved, and what happens to that role if the artist is simply a conduit for other voices? Can the artist speak for communities from which the artist does not belong (is it better to utilize local artists from within the communities)?
Great book for studying community based public art 3 April 2014
By Lucy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book on community based public art! But, it is small and paper back so I still don't uderstand the high prices...I don't think it should be that expensive, I had to buy an used one.
Arrived quickly well packaged and as advertised 15 Sept. 2013
By Rev. David Price - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The work is a ground breaker in thoughtful art making. It is difficult to acquire. Worth the effort.for those who are serious about art making in an intentional manner.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Great Book 27 Aug. 2011
By TH - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Arrived from the seller top-notch! I am using this for my MFA program, and it has already proved incredibly useful. The questions and ideas brought about by Susan Lacy surrounding public art are interesting and deeply engaging.
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