Mankind Beyond Earth and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading Mankind Beyond Earth on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Mankind Beyond Earth: The History, Science, and Future of Human Space Exploration [Hardcover]

Claude Plantadosi
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: 24.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 23 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 16.62  
Hardcover 24.00  
Paperback 17.50  

Book Description

29 Jan 2013
Seeking to reenergize Americans' passion for the space program, the value of further exploration of the Moon, and the importance of human beings on the final frontier, Claude A. Piantadosi presents a rich history of American space exploration and its major achievements. He emphasizes the importance of reclaiming national command of our manned program and continuing our unmanned space missions, and he stresses the many adventures that still await us in the unfolding universe. Acknowledging space exploration's practical and financial obstacles, Piantadosi challenges us to revitalize American leadership in space exploration in order to reap its scientific bounty. Piantadosi explains why space exploration, a captivating story of ambition, invention, and discovery, is also increasingly difficult and why space experts always seem to disagree. He argues that the future of the space program requires merging the practicalities of exploration with the constraints of human biology. Space science deals with the unknown, and the margin (and budget) for error is small. Lethal near-vacuum conditions, deadly cosmic radiation, microgravity, vast distances, and highly scattered resources remain immense physical problems. To forge ahead, America needs to develop affordable space transportation and flexible exploration strategies based in sound science. Piantadosi closes with suggestions for accomplishing these goals, combining his healthy skepticism as a scientist with an unshakable belief in space's untapped -- and wholly worthwhile -- potential.

Frequently Bought Together

Mankind Beyond Earth: The History, Science, and Future of Human Space Exploration + Space Probes: 50 Years of Exploration from Luna 1 to New Horizons
Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (29 Jan 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231162421
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231162425
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 810,089 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

An important book by a visionary with his feet planted on the ground.Kirkus ReviewsKirkus Reviews Kirkus Reviews 10/1/2012 Finally, a give-it-to-me-straight account of why space exploration matters. In Mankind Beyond Earth, Claude A. Piantadosi folds together science, politics, and culture to demonstrate why a civilization without a spacefaring future is doomed to extinction. -- Neil Degrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, American Museum of Natural History, author of Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier In this engaging book, Claude A. Piantadosi presents a concise and accurate history of how our nation's space program arrived at its current uncertain juncture, supplementing it with powerful insights into a wide range of fields, from planetary science to human physiology. This is a compelling work from a scientist committed to expanding the human exploration of our universe. -- Michael L. Gernhardt, NASA astronaut, manager of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Recommended for readers intrigued by the real-life requirements of space exploration. Library Journal 1/1/2013 This nicely written volume will appeal to the general public and space enthusiasts who want to learn about the hazards of human space exploration. Choice June 2013 Piantadosi's goal throughout the book is to explain to the lay audience why spaceexploration is difficult and important. He achieves this first goal in a clear manner,very accessible to someone without a technical background. -- Lisa Messeri MetaScience October 2013

About the Author

Claude A. Piantadosi MD is professor and director of the F. G. Hall Environmental Laboratory at Duke University. Educated at the University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he trained in undersea medicine and saturation diving in the U.S. Navy and in respiratory physiology and pulmonary medicine at Duke. He spent thirty years as a resource consultant to NASA. He is an author of more than three hundred scientific papers and The Biology of Human Survival: Life and Death in Extreme Environments.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Mankind beyond Earth 28 April 2013
By Clare O'Beara TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Carl Sagan said that mankind would have to explore space to survive. Yet budget and programme cuts mean NASA has to pay Russia $62.7 million per astronaut they carry to the International Space Station aboard Soyuz vessels. Written from an American point of view, but ultimately the view of humanity's future, this factual book reassesses the benefits and difficulties of space exploration.

Robots are cheaper and easier to send as explorers than to send all the support systems required by fragile humans. Yet manned space missions have given spinoff benefits, such as Teflon, better prosthetics, telemedicine, better preserved foods, better kidney dialysis machines and advances in aviation safety. Space science has given us satellites, so improved communications, forecasting and views of changing climates - and detection of near-flying asteroids. Research will benefit humanity, whether in the field of pure physics or seeing if a biodome can grow enough food to support life on the Moon.

Claude Piantadosi supports returning to the Moon, as a testing ground for the survival systems we will need to explore Mars. He analyses problems at NASA, explaining that when innovators get stifled by red tape and budget cuts they skip off to private industry. We have come an awe-inspiring distance since the start of the twentieth century, when heavier-than-air flight was first achieved by the Wrights. We have landed a robot on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, and Mars Rovers trundle across that planet and send back data.

Biomedicine explores how we can live under stressful conditions, such as a year or more in space. We see comparisons with Tibetan and Andean populations, each of which has found a different physiological adaptation to altitude.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant and fascinating science lesson, loosely organized around space exploration 1 Mar 2013
By Aaron C. Brown - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I loved this book, but you may not. The author is a scientist of broad interest who tells you much more than you need to know to weigh alternative ideas for exploring outer space. For example, there are four ways to die from lack of oxygen and the book gives concise but thorough descriptions of the physiology of each one. Someday an astronaut may have a heart attack (ischemia) in space, or die from cytotoxic or stagnant hypoxia due to disease or genetic defect. But you'd think a book on space travel would concentrate on not having oxygen because space is a vacuum and other planets don't have oxygen atmospheres and maybe your spaceship or spacesuit sprang a leak or your oxygen recycling system broke down (hypoxic hypoxia, if you’re keeping track). The book has a similarly comprehensive account of how radiation affects tissues instead of describing only the most significant short-term dangers of cosmic rays outside the Van Allen belt.

It’s not just physiology that gets this treatment, the author will launch into general discussions of physics, chemistry, geology, scientific history or anything else that interests him with the least excuse. Ever wondered about how we got those International Geophysical and International Polar years? Or what the “Antarctic stare” is? Then this is the book for you. But if you’re looking for a focused discussion of the technology of space travel, you might get frustrated. Think of a late-night rambling discussion with a very smart guy who has thought a lot about exploration of outer space, who has a strong pedantic streak that is tolerable because he actually knows what he’s talking about and it’s interesting stuff.

Another feature of this book that will not be universally popular but that I liked, is the author has strong opinions and little patience for alternative views. Exploration means sending humans, and the only path worth considering is developing self-sustaining resources and capabilities like permanent low-Earth orbit facilities, a moon base, methodologies for extended living without resupply and mining, processing, reprocessing and disposal technologies to manage physical resources off-Earth. Space should be explored because that’s what humans do, and maybe a little for what we will learn, but it will not be valuable as a permanent place to live. You will learn why the author holds these opinions, but not much about why others may disagree (attractive ideas the author doesn’t wish to discuss are labeled “mind candy” and left at that).

The writing style is clear and vigorous, with a distinctive voice. My only gripe is the author is overfond of silly acronyms and tables that could use better design and any point at all. This is a book that will teach you a lot about a lot of things, and will be a pleasure to read for those who like to learn without worrying about whether there is any use to the learning.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mankind Beyond Earth 21 May 2013
By Clare O'Beara - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Carl Sagan said that mankind would have to explore space to survive. Yet budget and programme cuts mean NASA has to pay Russia $62.7 million per astronaut they carry to the International Space Station aboard Soyuz vessels. Written from an American point of view, but ultimately the view of humanity's future, this factual book reassesses the benefits and difficulties of space exploration.

Robots are cheaper and easier to send as explorers than to send all the support systems required by fragile humans. Yet manned space missions have given spinoff benefits, such as Teflon, better prosthetics, telemedicine, better preserved foods, better kidney dialysis machines and advances in aviation safety. Space science has given us satellites, so improved communications, forecasting and views of changing climates - and detection of near-flying asteroids. Research will benefit humanity, whether in the field of pure physics or seeing if a biodome can grow enough food to support life on the Moon.

Claude Piantadosi supports returning to the Moon, as a testing ground for the survival systems we will need to explore Mars. He analyses problems at NASA, explaining that when innovators get stifled by red tape and budget cuts they skip off to private industry. We have come an awe-inspiring distance since the start of the twentieth century, when heavier-than-air flight was first achieved by the Wrights. We have landed a robot on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, and Mars Rovers trundle across that planet and send back data.

Biomedicine explores how we can live under stressful conditions, such as a year or more in space. We see comparisons with Tibetan and Andean populations, each of which has found a different physiological adaptation to altitude. Polar explorations and undersea work are all steps along the journey. Space exploration to date is of course reprised, including the tragic accidents and misfires. Living off local and recycled resources is the only way to establish a stable habitat beyond the Moon, as the cost and difficulty of resupply would be prohibitive. The current technology for space travel is explained and combinations can be used, from solar power to nuclear power. Recycling and discovering local water and oxygen are top priority for any new base. Growing food and providing nutrients will be vital, as away from sunlight our vitamin D levels drop, and combined with microgravity our bones become brittle. The author explores the currently understood physiological alterations of space travel on astronauts, from osteoporosis to cancers. Radiation is a major hazard, both solar and background. And what to do with the trash, from human waste to food packaging? Is it ethical to start a waste dump on Mars?

As to where we can go, Venus is unfortunately a hazardously hot environment so Mars is the obvious challenge. We could also visit small bodies such as asteroids - the large Ceres would be a good target - or some moons of large but further planets, such as Titan and Ganymede. As for other stars, we would need fast propulsion to reach those in any reasonable timeframe.

I was astonished that Piantadosi still thinks Mercury is tidally locked to the sun (page 56). Possibly this was just badly phrased? We know now that due to orbital factors we see the same face each time it comes around, but the small planet does rotate and each 'day' on Mercury lasts two of its 'years'. A certain level of astrophysics is required to get the best out of this book, but even looking up the Lagrange points on a site like Wikipedia will give helpful diagrams (there are diagrams in this book too) and astronomers from teens to adults will be fascinated. So many combined sciences are represented that we can see biologists, medics, engineers, chemists and mechanics will all be needed if Earth people are ever to call another planet home. If one section is outside your experience the next section may prove easier to understand. The omission which surprises me most is that of the Three-D Printer, by which an astronaut could insert a diagram for a tool or other item and the printer would build it layer by layer. We are also told nothing about intelligent glass and graphene.

As a lifelong science fiction fan I enjoyed catching up with some of the latest space exploration science in MANKIND BEYOND EARTH.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent mix of topics 16 Mar 2013
By LewisC - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I am a huge reader of science texts. I've read all the popular books and I like to delve into the less well known. I've honestly never heard of Professor Piantadosi nor have I read his work before.

The author looks at the history of space exploration and the barriers facing us in the future. As he says, space travel is not just about technology, it also about biology. He makes the point more than once that it is also about finances and politics. He starts off showing the passion of the people who made it to the moon and explains the difficulties they faced.

As we go through the book, he explains the importance of sustenance, waste removal, air for breathing, propulsion, distances, the effects of radiation on physiology and technology and so much more. Who will be the people exploring, what will they explore and how will they do it.

Some people may not like his style of writing. Like many scientific texts, it's written in a mostly informal essay style. While everything he says is related, he tends to jump around a bit. In the space of just a few pages, he explains the measurements we'll use in space (not just KM and light-year but AU and parsec), biomedicine, stress and the effects of radiation. Stuck in there is a great discussion of the people who live above 12,000 feet and how they have adapted to that life.

I say same people may not like it, but I found the entire thing to be fascinating. I've never seen some of the concepts explained as well as the author does it. There are a lot of topics I have never seen addressed for the layman.

This book is sort of like National Geographic for the Space Explorer. Maybe even a little popular mechanics thrown in for good measure. I really enjoyed it and recommend it to anyone who likes general space science. Give it a few chapters to decide whether nor not to finish. If you can make it to chapter 3, you'll have a good feel for his writing. I found it to be a bit quirky but, in the end, a great way to approach so many topics. Space travel really is complicated, more so than many people believe.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Valuable Synopsis 1 Sep 2013
By Christopher - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Dr. Piantadosi thoroughly covers what we have learned so far about the effects of microgravity on human physiology and the anticipated negative environmental factors in space we might face because of extended stays. Like me, he feels the next logical step is the Moon.
5.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive and well written. 11 Feb 2014
By norgadoc - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Covers history and physiology of space exploration and the technical difficulties to be faced in the future while remaining very readable. Makes a great gift for a family member interested in space or your Congressman.

M Lynch
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback