Manhattan Transfer (Penguin Modern Classics) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £2.00 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used Good condition book may have signs of cover wear and/or marks on corners and page edges. Inside pages may have highlighting, writing and underlining. All purchases eligible for Amazon customer service and a 30-day return policy.
Trade in your item
Get a £1.60
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Manhattan Transfer (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – 31 Aug 2000


See all 35 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£4.57 £4.65
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Manhattan Transfer (Penguin Modern Classics) + My Antonia
Price For Both: £10.64

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.60
Trade in Manhattan Transfer (Penguin Modern Classics) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.60, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; New Ed edition (31 Aug 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141184485
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141184487
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.1 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 39,199 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Three gulls wheel above the broken boxes, orangerinds, spoiled cabbage heads that heave between the splintered plank walls, the green waves spume under the round bow as the ferry, skidding on the tide, crashes, gulps the broken water, slides, settles slowly into the slip. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Alun Williams VINE VOICE on 2 April 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Now we are post credit-crunch this is probably a very good time to read this unusual American novel. At times it was hard to believe that Manhattan Transfer is describing the New York of 80+ years ago, so contemporary did it sometimes feel to me. The blurb on the back implies it is a novel about early 20's N.Y., but this is rather inaccurate. My grasp of history is not good enough to be precise, but the story certainly spans a period of over twenty years, and only reaches the twenties in the third of the three sections into which it is divided.

The prose style is idiosyncratic to say the least: the author loves creating German-style compound words, and frequently employs very individual spelling and punctuation. Some people might want to employ the dread phrase "prose poem" to describe it. The novel flits from character to character every few pages, sometimes even more often, with many appearing only once (so that very often I found it necessary to rifle through the earlier pages to try to confirm whether a character had appeared previously, and to see what had happened to him or her before)

This novel will probably tax the patience of many readers, but though I found it difficult to read more than 10 or 20 pages in one sitting, I was determined to finish it. I enjoy meeting people in pubs, even if I never see them again, and so I felt very comfortable with this book, because much of it is set in bars or restaurants, and characters are presented very vividly whether or not they will reappear later, and with something of the same intensity that one drink too many sometimes brings about. Although the city of New York always dominates over the humans I found the characterisation very satisfying.

Dos Passos was more or less contemporary with F.
Read more ›
14 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Widnes Bob on 19 Jan 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the finest American authors I have read; as suggested, this novel uses a 'cut and paste' technique, where you don't follow every step of the major character. The novel follows the interwoven lives of several characters going through the 1920's New York scene. Dos Passos gets you inside the head of the main character, but moves you forward, occasionally leaving the action behind.

A superb novel to read, and then re-read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Wee Shook on 3 Mar 2011
Format: Paperback
I cannot recommend this book highly enough. I haven't finished it yet and am trying to slow my reading of it because I do not know what I will do when I am finished! You don't read this book so much as view the images it creates. I have missed stops on the bus numerous times while reading this book because I have been so enthralled. I see what the other reviewers are saying about it being fragmented and the characters do come and go but a number of them do remain throughout the book and once you get used to his unusual style it is easy to follow.

The fact that the author can evoke such imagery in a few short lines is a testament to his unique and undoubted ability.

It is one of the most evocative and beautifully written pieces of work I have ever read and if you are interested in American society from the 1900's through to the 1920's then this is a must read.

I wonder will I enjoy Ulysses as much??
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By heyjude on 30 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I presented this book as one of 4 with 'New York' as the theme for choice at a book group and was surprised that it was chosen as it sounded a little 'odd' from the reviews I took along. BUT I am sooooo glad it was chosen; what a wonderful book. I just loved the prose, some of which has a feel of poetry. Whilst reading this 'historical novel', which starts at the turn of 19th/20th century and continues into the 1920s, I could not get over that fact that it was, in fact, published 85 years ago. It feels so fresh and modern. The characterisations are brilliant and I wanted to read on to find out where their stories were taking me. A story of success and failure, riches and poverty, changes and challenges and the melting pot that was (is?) New York. They talk of escaping the City but don't; it holds them under its spell - or is it curse? I want to read this book again, and soon, so that I can re-explore the style and the characters, and the roles roles assigned to them by the author. A highly recommended piece of 'modern' literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Brian Ó Cuinn on 14 Aug 2009
Format: Paperback
From the outset you know you're reading something expansive, something just as massive and varied as the city of Manhattan itself. It's characters are from all pasrts of society, especially as regards the financial spectrum which I suppose is at the heart of this book. Characters die, go bankrupt and shoot to prominence in a web of criss-crossing stories where no one is the main character; you're not reading a narrative on one person's life, you're watching the events of a living, breathing city. If anyone is a main character, it's the city itself; perfectly depicted in the time of the novel; it's a great comparison to Faulkner's depictions of rural America too. It's an adventurous piece of wiritng and if you're looking for some modern American lit. I highly recommend it.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By messageinthemoon on 7 Jun 2010
Format: Paperback
Having heard about this author relatively recently I was keen to read some of his work.
I had been forewarned that he uses a kind of cut and paste technique to give an impression of a diversity of characters living their busy lives together in a bustling city, and I rather liked that idea. However, in practice I found the individual storylines just a little to fragmented to carry me along. I had such little time with the characters I just had no real empathy for them. In fact for me the experience really was like being in a very large group of people in that the faces of the characters and all the things that might make them individual to us were simply lost in the confusion of the crowd. Furthermore it really did seem to me that like the old cliche, they were all busy going nowhere.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback