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Manafon (Deluxe Edition) Box set, CD+DVD, Deluxe Edition, Import


Price: £111.09
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Amazon's David Sylvian Store

Music

Image of album by David Sylvian

Photos

Image of David Sylvian

Biography

The David Sylvian that fronted new wave pop band Japan wore luminescent hair and glam make-up; on the cover of his solo debut, 1984's Brilliant Trees, he was stylish and refined, a gentleman popster. But the illustration that introduces 2003's Blemish sends a different message: he's bedraggled and unshaven, his far-off expression turned haunted. The new millennium has seen a more ... Read more in Amazon's David Sylvian Store

Visit Amazon's David Sylvian Store
for 59 albums, 6 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Manafon (Deluxe Edition) + Blemish + There's A Light That Enters Houses With No Other House In Sight.  [Cd Digipak]
Price For All Three: £137.12

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Product details

  • Audio CD (21 Sept. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Box set, CD+DVD, Deluxe Edition, Import
  • Label: Samadhisound
  • ASIN: B002MUBU4Q
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 361,682 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Small Metal Gods
2. Rabbit Skinner, The
3. Random Acts Of Senseless Violence
4. Greatest Living Englishman, The
5. 125 Spheres
6. Snow White In Appalachia
7. Emily Dickinson
8. Department Of Dead Letters, The
9. Manafon
Disc: 2
1. Small Metal Gods (5.1)
2. The Rabbit Skinner (5.1)
3. Random Acts Of Senseless Violence (5.1)
4. The Greatest Living Englishman (5.1)
5. 125 Spheres (5.1)
6. Snow White In Appalachia (5.1)
7. Emily Dickinson (5.1)
8. The Department Of Dead Letters (5.1)
9. Manafon (5.1)
10. Amplified Gesture

Product Description

This two-disc box set comes in two separate (18.7cm x 24.1cm) hard back, cloth-bound volumes which are themselves inserted into a cloth-bound rigid slip case. Each of the three cloth-bound items feature gold embossed lettering. There is an accompanying (18.5cm x 23.5cm) black on white high quality print of a portrait of David Sylvian by Atsushi Fukui. There are only 2,000 in print worldwide.

Volume One: a 40 page full colour printed, perfect bound book to accompany Manafon, featuring the complete lyrics from Manafon, accompanied by artwork from the artists Atsushi Fukui and Ruud Van Empel. The CD is the standard version of Manafon.

Volume Two: a 24 page full colour printed, perfect bound book to accompany the documentary “Amplified Gesture”. With a foreword by Clive Bell, this book contains photos and biographies of all of the contributors to the documentary. The DVD is an NTSC Region 0 disc that contains: “Amplified Gesture” - a documentary (duration 55 mins approx), plus Manafon audio in 5.1 dts surround sound mixed by David Sylvian PCM Stereo (48 kHz, 24 bit).

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Baker on 17 Dec. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you liked Japan and David Sylvian's first album (Brilliant Trees, with hits like "Ink and the Well") then this might be the album for you, but not just yet.

The voice is the same (mellifluous baritone), indeed better, but the sparse, avant garde accompaniment might be a shock. Better to take his career in chronological order. If you make it as far as Manafon you are in for a rare treat, but it's just possible that you and Mr Sylvian will cite artistic differences and part company before you get here.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Casley TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Maddy Costa in `The Guardian' described this album as "a forbidding proposition", but then went on to say that with the right approach it "becomes mesmerising". David Sylvian's latest album to date (2012) is certainly a radical departure, and will unfortunately disappoint listeners on their first hearing, who might then give up and move on to something else. It disappointed me too. But each subsequent play made me appreciate more the value of this stunning work.

The music is still subtly crafted, as one would expect, and this despite the paring down of instruments - and indeed, a paring down of sheer instrumental notes. And Sylvian's voice has matured with an honest, haunting quality. But how to adequately describe the music to be heard on this set is a problem for this reviewer. Why did Sylvian adopt such a sparse approach to songs, which if re-arranged differently could become standard pop-rock fodder. The one word that formulated in my mind to concisely explain Sylvian's approach here is `brave'.

Slow folksy ballads from a real or imaginary locale are sung with minimal instrumental accompaniment (and I mean minimal). Yet great care and attention, as always, is given to this, including electronic sampling effects. Each track adopts the overall minimalist form but each is different - indeed one is, curiously, an instrumental.

Sylvian sings stories of lost and losing people - "There's a man down in the valley, trying to stop time in its tracks" - and of lives "without purchase, no story to tell ... Here lies a man without qualities." These last lines are from a song called `The Rabbit Skinner', and with a drawing on the inner sleeve of Sylvian holding a dead rabbit, one wonders if we are to infer that the skinner is Sylvian.
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51 of 62 people found the following review helpful By song_x on 9 Aug. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Oh well, I can tell you what will happen when a lot of the reviews will have been published: there will be writers who will miss that "persona" of Sylvian who created albums like BRILLIANT TREES or DEAD BEES ON A CAKE; and there will be some writers (hopefully the majority!) who will love this song cycle (I'm quite sure the great Richard Williams will like this album very much, the man who has just released the fine book THE BLUE MOMENT about the groundbreaking atmosphere of Miles Davis' KIND OF BLUE and its long echoes). The reason for such controversial reactions: the voice is the only instrument that is carrying the melody.

There are no grooves, no classic harmonies that supply the perfomance (the flights) of the voice. The music comes from the free improv-scene (Evan Parker, Christian Fennesz a.o.) and creates strangely spidery textures you might never have heared before as a "background" or environment for a singer. Pop beyond Pop, modern chamber music with a touch of jazz and the Japanese art of playing sine waves and turntables...

The moods are exquisite, the lyrics enigmatic, and the singing has that kind of nakedness where artists risk a lot. This is music that belongs to the same class as the late Talk Talk albums and Scott Walker's TILT or THE DRIFT. It is a good thing that there are still some guys on the planet who are looking for new horizons and who are not so much interested in repeating a formula that will constantly please the conservative part of their audience.

When Sylvian recorded BLEMISH, he discovered new areas for his songwriting - MANAFON is the best continuation of that path you can imagine.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Ms. J. Forrest on 15 Sept. 2009
Format: Audio CD
David Sylvian's career has spanned a thirty-year period, initially finding its way through the popular New Romantic movement with the band Japan. Sylvian subsequently went on to produce a quality body of mature solo work, his debut emerging in 1984 with Brilliant Trees. Going from strength to strength ever since, he's reinvented himself musically at various stages along the way.
His latest release, Manafon, is an unconventional work and perhaps one of the most diverse to date, and testament to his development. It sees Sylvian stripped bare of any lavish trimmings. The compositions reach out with naked hands, clinging to intelligent and sometimes complex observations and rigorous study of character.

Sylvian scratches the edges of some dark surfaces; however the centrefold is even more expressive with its hues of jaded normality - a conceptual status throughout.

Sylvian portrays deep insights with his lonely textured vocals, grasping the heart of the subject and shaping it in a way that only his own strength of voice could direct. Instrumentation is sparse yet effective and orchestrated in a unique way - the diverse sounds intervene at all the right moments integrating well with the mood. His haunting lullaby has a strong sense of purpose - pivoted centrally throughout the album against its dark fabric - the colours of which are all exceptionally responsive. With production that's crystal clear - every creek or stirring within the atmosphere can be heard - all reacting and responding with an immense sharpness.

"Maybe I'm attracted to the stories of individuals who search for meaning on their own terms," says Sylvian. "But what I'm fascinated by is the devotion to a creative discipline.
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