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Man of Muscle Mystery (Flex Mentallo) Hardcover – Special Edition, 4 Apr 2012


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; De Luxe edition edition (4 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401232213
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401232214
  • Product Dimensions: 18.7 x 1.1 x 28.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 396,027 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"A compelling work by one of the best writers of the modern era...Grant Morrison at his metaphysical prime."--iFanboy "Morrison and Quitely have the magic touch that makes any book they collaborate on stand out form the rest."-MTV's Splash Page "The Paul McCartney/John Lennon of comics."--Nashville City Paper "Writer Grant Morrison and artist Frank Quitely might be the the best one-two punch in comics"--Toronto Metro News

About the Author

Grant Morrison has been working with DC Comics for twenty years, after beginning this American comics career with acclaimed runs on ANIMAL MAN and DOOM PATROL. Since then, he has written such best-selling series as JLA, BATMAN and New X-Men, as well as creator-owned titles as THE INVISIBLES, SEAGUY, THE FILTH, WE3 AND JOE THE BARBARIAN. Morrison has also expanded the borders of the DC Universe in the award-winning pages of SEVEN SOLDIERS, ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, FINAL CRISIS and BATMAN, INCORPORATED, and he currently reinventing the Man of Steel in the all-new ACTION COMICS.

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3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 15 April 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A pop singer tries to commit suicide by overdosing on pills, meanwhile talking to the Samaritans on his Stingeray phone while waiting for death; a fictional golden age superhero called Flex Mentallo is out to find his long lost sidekick "the Fact" while saving the world; and reality and fictional, hyper-reality (remember you're reading Grant Morrison) collide as people and superheroes find out a deeper truth about the cosmos. Muscle mystery indeed!

Having recently read Morrison's nonfiction book about superheroes "Supergods" as well as a documentary about Morrison "Talking with Gods", the book feels part autobiographical from the viewpoint of the suicidal pop singer. The childhood he relates is a lot like Morrison's, growing up with the threat of the bomb, the fighting parents, and the early and long lasting love affair with comics. The kid's drawings of comics might even be reprints of Morrison's early attempts at creating comics (he originally wanted to be a comics artist rather than writer). Flex Mentallo dates back to these teen years when he created him as a parody of the Charles Atlas characters from the 30s-40s.

There's also the theories of other worlds, parallel worlds, and how comics are our true selves trying to remind our parallel selves that we are more powerful and incredible than we think we are, that we're superheroes who've forgotten we're superheroes. The theme stretches across a number of Morrison's works and is explained in full in "Supergods", while the multi-dimensions and superbeings talking to one another echo his own supposed alien encounter in the mountains of Katmandu in the early 90s.

The book is a bit hard to follow, crashing about the place with all sorts of twists and turns, but it's still amazingly creative and interesting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Squirr-El TOP 50 REVIEWER on 3 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover
The four-issue mini-series from 1996 starring the Doom Patrol's Flex Mentallo is collected as Man of Muscle Mystery (Flex Mentallo). Although I have not read his adventures with the Doom Patrol since their original publication, the story here seems to be unrelated to that incarnation of the character, but not to Grant Morrison's more esoteric style of storytelling, and this story could be considered a precursor to Joe the Barbarian TP, and is certainly an offshoot of the ending of his Animal Man series. Here we have two strands of story, one featuring Flex Mentallo, who is trying to unravel a mystery set in his own comic-book world - inhabited by characters inspired by and more interesting than many `real' comic book characters; and a second strand featuring a comic-book creator who thinks he is dying from a drug overdose. The stories seem to overlap, are certainly intercut, and it is difficult to tell if they are interacting with each other - though neither of them is really `real', of course, though we probably assume the overdose guy is meant to be real. However, despite Frank Quitely's excellent artwork - I really want to see those `comic book' characters in `real' stories - I prefer continuing characters in continuing stories, and this is in effect a one-off short story. If you like that format, then this is for you, but it was not something that will live on in my memory.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Nathan Samuel on 17 April 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have always been a huge fan of Grant Morrison, owning several of his other works, and the man has always delivered. After reading Supergods, I was thoroughly convinced that there will never be, nor has there ever been a greater writer than Morrison (except maybe Jack Kirby, of course). Whether it's taking the reins as the writer of the Caped Crusader himself, or even rebooting the X-men, he always has a firm grip on the lore behind the story, more so if the story is his own.

And that brings me to Flex Mentallo. Flex Mentallo, on the first and most basic level, is a story about a hulky muscle man brought to life by his own writer, brought into a world that desperately needs people like him. In a world where people are living in the streets and getting beaten up by gangs, Flex does his best to be the "Superman" of his world. The story, like many of Grant's terrific tales, can be a very disorienting ride, especially for newcomers to his work. Some will complain that the story is complex for the sake of being complex; another common criticism of Grant's writing style.

However, on a deeper level, you will learn that the story isn't just about Flex, it's about us. The series is broken down into 4 issues, and this is for a good reason.

The story is a commentary on the writing of comics as a whole. Flex Mentallo covers all 4 comic writing periods (Golden Age, Silver Age, Bronze (or Dark) Age and Modern Age). with each issue covering that theme through story arc, artwork, and general atmosphere.

You begin to realise that Flex's world is indeed our world, and what we are making of it.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Black Mask on 13 April 2012
Format: Hardcover
I really like Morrison's writing, but he can be guilty of labouring a point or taking off on unnecessarily odd tangents. Here, he's bang on the money. Concise, entertaining, provocative, strange... and the art is aces. Quitely and Morrison together are priceless. Maybe Morrison should be compelled to do everything in four issues?
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