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Man with the Iron Heart Hardcover – 1 Jul 2008


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey Books; 1 edition (1 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345504348
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345504340
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 16.7 x 4.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,087,660 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Harry Turtledove is the award-winning author of the alternate-history works The Man with the Iron Heart; The Guns of the South; How Few Remain (winner of the Sidewise Award for Best Novel); the Worldwar saga: In the Balance, Tilting the Balance, Upsetting the Balance, and Striking the Balance; the Colonization books: Second Contact, Down to Earth, and Aftershocks; the Great War epics: American Front, Walk in Hell, and Breakthroughs; the American Empire novels: Blood & Iron, The Center Cannot Hold, and Victorious Opposition; and the Settling Accounts series: Return Engagement, Drive to the East, The Grapple, and In at the Death. Turtledove is married to fellow novelist Laura Frankos. They have three daughters: Alison, Rachel, and Rebecca.

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By MarkK TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 25 July 2008
Format: Hardcover
For the past decade, the summer has been the occasion of another entry in Harry Turtledove's "Southern Victory" alternate history series. In it, he explored the eighty years after a Civil War in which the South had won its independence, his last volume, Settling Accounts: In at the Death (Great War) saw the Confederacy defeated and dissolved after their version of the Second World War. Having apparently finished with the series, Turtledove has moved on to this book. In it, he takes the "Werewolf" resistance movement devised by the Nazis before the demise of the Third Reich and puts it in the hands of Reinhard Heydrich, whom is spared his assassination by Czech partisans during the war.

Benefitting from better planning and more ruthless leadership, the Werewolves unleash a fearsome terrorist campaign against the Allied occupation forces. Soldiers are murdered and mutilated, truck bombs explode, and leading commanders targeted by rocket launcher-equipped fanatics. Readers of Turtledove's earlier series will find his depiction of this similar to that in his earlier novels, when he envisioned disaffected Mormons becoming suicide bombers and conquered Confederates waging a diehard resistance against occupying U.S. forces. But whereas in the earlier novels these elements were only part of the storyline, here they take center stage and form the basis of the action.

When reading the book, it soon becomes apparent that Turtledove draws many of his ideas from the American experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, both in terms of the occupation and the reaction to it on the home front.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. A. Shaw on 18 Aug 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book caught me out.More like a thiller then Harry's usual stuff not going to say much more but is very good go out and read it make up your own minds I enjoyed it a lot if it was a new author people would go on and wonderfull, smashingread so on.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. G. Nuttall on 6 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
What if the Germans had resisted Occupation after WW2?

Harry Turtledove's single-volume books are generally better than his massive multi-volume sets. Ruled Britannia, The Guns of the South and In the Presence of Mine Enemies are all excellent reads, although the last one has rather more verbiage than is actually required. The same cannot be said for his massive endless series; the Darkness, Great War and even WorldWar often bogged down into repetitiveness and were just plain boring. They highlight a major flaw in Turtledove's work; he uses real history as a guide to alternate history. ITPOME has a Soviet-style crisis for the Third Reich, GW has a Hitler-alternate and a mirror image of the Barbarossa Campaign in America (totally unrealistic). With that in mind, I was not particularly hopeful of The Man With The Iron Heart and only bought a copy because it was being sold for £1.50 at Oxfam.

It's Iraq. In Germany, 1945.

(If that puts you off, don't bother to read any further.)

The OTL Nazi Werewolves never amounted to very much; indeed, their only major success was the death of a pro-Allied Mayor in an occupied German city. (Paratroopers, not sleeper teams) In ATL, SS Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich survives and organises a resistance movement in Germany, which launches an insurgency campaign within weeks of the Fall of Berlin. Instead of a reasonably peaceful occupation, the Allies find themselves fighting an invisible foe, while back home a woman called Mrs Diana McGuire, the mother of a soldier killed after the end of hostilities - and a thinly veiled image of Cindy Sheehan - starts a major campaign to bring the soldiers home from Iraq...sorry, I meant Germany. Easy mistake to make...
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By Gilman Grundy on 13 Dec 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book succeeds as a story of the time, although the ending owes much to the time of the writing of the book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Being a long-time fan of Harry Turtledove and a bit of a student of the immediate post-war world I looked forward to this. However, though it is a very readable tale and similar in style to all his books - lots of parallel low level stories some of which are significant in the world of the story - it is an unlikely tale to say the least. If you can read it and accept it as being about some other similar but different universe then it's OK but if you're likely to get hung up on the improbabilities of the tale forget it.

The author does appear to have a world-view which consists of Americans and 'the-rest' and sees Europe as a far more homogeneous entity than it is, let alone as it was more than 70 years ago. In particular his view of Germany and Germans doesn't match any recognizable version of that country that I know of. Germans, particularly the more fanatically fascists such as the Hitler Youth and SS, were suicidally brave but seldom, if ever simply suicidal. It is difficult to identify where his numerous suicide bombers would have come from - some perhaps, but not a steady stream for 2 years.

Also I can't avoid remarking on one language 'howler'. He seems to think that the German word 'Kugel' means a noodle but had an alternative meaning of a bullet (particularly as in 'in the back of the head'). Kugel means and always has meant ball (eg, Kugelschreiber - Ball point pen, Kannonenkugel - cannon ball) and like in English is a standard word for a bullet type projectile. Goodness knows where he got his idea from!
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