FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A Man About A Dog: Euphem... has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Man About A Dog: Euphemisms and Other Examples of Verbal Squeamishness Paperback – 9 Sep 2011

4 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£11.99
£7.82 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£11.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • A Man About A Dog: Euphemisms and Other Examples of Verbal Squeamishness
  • +
  • More Tea Vicar?: An Embarrassment of Domestic Catchphrases
Total price: £19.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Collins (9 Sept. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007214545
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007214549
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 13.3 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 837,803 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Here are 2467 examples of verbal perfume. Nigel Rees, one of Britain's best-known commentators on popular language, has ranged far and wide to collect and comment on this huge selection of euphemisms - those expressions which so inventively display the art of mincing words and white resolutely avoid calling a spade a spade.

From the politically correct to the highly incorrect, A Man About a Dog goes in ruthless pursuit of the coy, the prudish, the obfuscatory and blatant reshaping of the truth. So, whether you wish to 'discuss Ugandan affairs' with someone, or have issues with your 'ambient replenishment assistant' when you go shopping or need to work on your 'terminological inexactitude' when you ring in sick to work, this wonderful book with guide, illuminate and entertain along the way.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Nigel Rees is a leading authority on the use of well-known phrases and sayings. As a broadcaster, he is best-known as the deviser and presenter of BBC Radio's Quote…Unquote.
As an author, he has written many books devoted to quotations and aspects of the popular use of the English language, always emphasizing the humour in his subject.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Lots of common euphamisms and words are created regularly and although this collates many previous words there were a dissappointingly large number of words or euphamisms which I have known for decades and yet do not appear in this book.

Also the fact new euphamisms are coming out regularly which means this is kind of out of date. Its a nice snapshot of time though.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book for looking at the area of taboo subjects in English language and how we get around these by using euphemism.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is quite a revelation. I did not realise how many ways there were to visit the little boys room
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Neutral VINE VOICE on 31 Jan. 2009
Format: Paperback
Although in the original Greek a euphemism was the breaking of an idea gently or inoffensively, it is now the business of not calling a spade a spade. It is a mealy-mouthed method of avoiding using the correct words to describe an activity. Many of these appear to concern bodily parts, bodily functions or sexuality which many humans regard as too embarrassing, or too distressing, to speak about. This book provides 2467 examples of what it calls "verbal perfume".

It's my "time of the month" serves as a euphemism for a woman's menstrual period although, when referred to by a third party, may well be expressed as "not at her best". Although females have breasts, these are frequently described as "melons", "jugs" or "natural attributes", while older men suffering from a decline in testosterone apparently now have "moobs" (man boobs).

Words for sexual intercourse and visiting the lavatory attract many variations. Jasper Carrott listed some of the former in his television comedy show, while the latter was brilliantly set out in a sketch by the late Ronnie Barker. "Adult" and "frank" are used to describe explicit sexual activity and language while "going to bed" with someone is a more polite reference to having sexual intercourse than some other terms used in the book. Thankfully, such terms still haven't completely replaced the traditional "As the Bishop said to the actress" references to illicit sex.

On a personal level I find TV introductions warning that "this programme contains strong language" to be a cop out and would prefer "there's a lot of swearing, cursing and other bad language in the next programme because the writer lacks the skill to write better plays".
Read more ›
Comment 1 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x90fabb64) out of 5 stars 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x91cf7f18) out of 5 stars A pick for both high school and college holdings 10 April 2007
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A MAN ABOUT A DOG: EUPHEMISMS & OTHER EXAMPLES OF VERBAL SQUEAMISHNESS offers up over two thousand examples of euphemisms which rely on word plays and the art of mincing words. An A-Z dictionary of expressions and sayings provides lively and fun reference perfect for trivia fans and any who enjoy surveys of the oddities and ironies of the English language, making it a pick for both high school and college holdings and general-interest public libraries strong on language studies and trivia facts alike.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback