Mammon's Kingdom: An Essay on Britain, Now and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £4.00 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Mammon's Kingdom: An Essa... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Mammon's Kingdom: An Essay on Britain, Now Hardcover – 29 May 2014


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£16.00
£7.94 £3.06
£16.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Mammon's Kingdom: An Essay on Britain, Now + Capital in the Twenty-First Century
Price For Both: £26.00

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.50
Trade in Mammon's Kingdom: An Essay on Britain, Now for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.50, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Allen Lane (29 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846146720
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846146725
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 2.7 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 250,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

One of Britain's leading political thinkers (John Gray)

David Marquand is a unique, perhaps irreplaceable, figure in British life. He has in his time played many parts: leader writer, Labour MP, Eurocrat, Oxford don. But his starring role has been as public intellectual, a civilising rhetorician of a type more common in France or the US ... Our outstanding centre-left theorist (Kenneth O. Morgan Independent)

An engaging and stylish political thinker, who moves adventurously across academic frontiers and straddles the worlds of scholarship and politics (Prospect)

An extremely pithy and witty writer (Dominic Sandbrook Telegraph)

About the Author

David Marquand is one of the leading left of centre political philosophers in the UK. He is a former Labour Member of Parliament and Chief Advisor in the Secretariat General of the European Commission, and from 1996 to 2002 was Principal of Mansfield College, Oxford. His many books include Ramsay MacDonald, The Unprincipled Society: New Demands and Old Politics, The Progressive Dilemma: From Lloyd George to Blair, Decline of the Public: The Hollowing-out of Citizenship, Britain Since 1918: The Strange Career of British Democracy and The End of the West: The Once and Future Europe. He is a Fellow of both the British Academy and the Learned Society of Wales. In 2001 he received the Sir Isaiah Berlin Prize for a lifetime contribution to Political Studies.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I only bought this book a week ago but I can already say that it is one of the most important books I have ever read. I am now a schoolteacher, a profession I entered seven years ago. In that short time I have seen how schools have been converted into petty fiefdoms squabbling in the marketplace, and where education is degenerating into an individualized commodity. Marquand reviews the whole concept of the development of the concept of public and collective responsibility, enshrined in farsighted 19th century legislation, only for this to be systematically dismantled by recent governments in favour of a world in which individuals are only out for themselves. Thus for example there is now no sense that graduates are also an important part of the greater collective good; instead, a degree is a purchasable commodity only of benefit to the graduate, hence the obscene levels of fees. This is amply summed up on p. 183 where he says 'In heath care, universities and schools marketization has speeded up, turning yet more public goods into commodities and yet more public servants into harassed salespeople'. Devastatingly true - in schools the systematic annihilation of Humanities and the Arts is a consequence of a belief that the only purpose of education is to churn out operatives who can make themselves and Britain financially richer. One of Marquand's crucial points is that this has all been derived from the absurd economic notion that we can all be predictable components of an economic system, conducted in an environment totally oblivious of the broader historical and economic context and all its lessons which are now being blithely ignored in the race to short-term profit. This is an excoriating review of modern Britain and it should by read by everyone who can get his or her hands on a copy.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Desdemona on 23 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I’m no economist, and I found the first part of this book quite heavy going. Once I managed to see beyond the references to Keynes, etc., I began to be able to appreciate what Marquand is really saying. He is, actually, quantifying the gut feeling that so many of us who are of his generation have had for years. The “Me, me, me” culture of the 70s/80s has inevitably led on to serious consequences on a much larger scale. Now that the generation which grew up in that period is raising another generation, the impact is being felt in all aspects of our national life: education, health and welfare, religion, community, politics, the economy, you name it ……..

However, we are not the first generation to feel this way. I recommend you to Google Rudyard Kipling’s poem “The Gods of the Copy Book Headings” – it was ever thus. We won’t see the wheel turn, but inevitably it will; and I’m not sure I want to be around to see the catastrophe that will be the catalyst.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Roger Whittaker on 1 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The title might suggest that it is just an attack on the way British politics is now dominated by the financial markets. It is that, but it's also a broader critique of individualism in all its forms. Marquand traces how this has developed as an unholy alliance of Hayekian market fundamentalism and the sixties counter-culture. What we have lost, Marquand argues, is an appreciation of the 'public realm'. By this he means something much broader than just the public sector. He means all the ways we used to acknowledge that people in their working lives are answerable to the general public.

At times there is a whiff of nostalgia as Marquand eulogises some of the fine public servants he once knew. But by the end he tries to offer a few hints of optimism. As well as describing some of the more public-minded current social movements, he draws inspiration from a diverse group of past thinkers: Burke, Mill and Tawney - a conservative, liberal and socialist/social democrat respectively. I take it this is a deliberately broad front, chosen to indicate how our narrow market individualism goes against all the political wisdom we once knew. Marquand is something of an old sage himself these days. I only hope we can re-learn something of the value of public service from him.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J E I Ferguson on 13 Nov. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Well researched and hard hitting account of why modern Britain has become the greedy, self-serving place it has. Few solutions are offered, other than the need to recover our dignity and integrity which, in view of the collapse of spiritual values, it may be hard to do. Should be read with Owen Jones' 'Chavs'
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Shivanataraja on 9 Dec. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Read it at one sitting - not simply because it's written that way (quasi conversational) but because he's been able to marshal all the relevant political, economic and social events of the last 25 years and filtered them through the collective psychological insanity that has allowed the present chaos to happen. Anyone who read Will Hutton's "The State We're In" (1995) or George Monbiot's "Captive State" (2000) should be seething on reading Marquand; he's reporting what could have been avoided but what was obliviously embraced.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By GrahamM on 27 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A passionate book about the decline of the public ethos. A cry of despair about how the market has invaded our lives and made us all poorer. There is little sign of hope here.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Andreas Arvanitis on 12 Jan. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent essay. It describes very accurately the social state not only of Britain but the Western States, as well. Weak governments are held hostages to the market forces who, in reality, rule our countries. Time to get our freedom and our voice. The author offers detailed and practical solutions to these problems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback