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Making Time: Why Time Seems to Pass at Different Speeds and How to Control it Hardcover – 2 Aug 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Icon Books Ltd (2 Aug. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840468262
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840468267
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 2.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 473,760 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Steve Taylor is the author of several books on spirituality and psychology, including The Fall, Out of the Darkness, Waking From Sleep and Back to Sanity. He is also the author of The Meaning, a book of poetic and spiritual reflections. Eckhart Tolle has described his work as 'an important contribution to the global shift in consciousness' while Ervin Laszlo has called Waking From Sleep 'the most enlightening book about enlightenment I have ever read.' Steve is a lecturer in psychology at Leeds Metropolitan University. He was included (at no. 31) in Mind, Body,Spirit magazine's recent list of the '100 most spiritually influential living people.'For more information see www.stevenmtaylor.co.uk

Product Description

Review

'A fascinating inquiry ... Taylor's book is so absorbing that time will fly by as you read it.'
-- Herald

'Provocative and freewheeling, wilfully unscientific without ever dabbling in pseudoscience, this book will really start you thinking about how you can try to be free.' -- The Independent, July 08

'Provocative and freewheeling... this book will really start you thinking about how you can try to be free.' -- The Independent, July 2008 --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

'Provocative and freewheeling, wilfully unscientific without ever dabbling in pseudoscience, this book will really start you thinking about how you can try to be free.' --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

158 of 162 people found the following review helpful By Howie on 4 Aug. 2007
Format: Hardcover
I did read this book very quickly but it felt like very little time passed while I was reading and now I understand why. As the book points out, absorption makes our experience of time seem to contract. While I was reading I recognised so many experiences from my own life and found myself continually in agreement. The author puts forward a very coherent theory which explains the different perceptions of time we experience in a variety of situations. As such it is extremely thought-provoking and plausible. Later the theories becomes more speculative but still plausible and stimulating, dealing with different states of consciousness and unusual experiences of time slowing down or disappearing. All the way through, even when dealing with quite complicated ideas the book is always very easy to read. You're carried along with the energy of the writing and the enthusiasm for ideas. At the end I feel inspired to try to live my live in a different way, making more time for new experience and trying to live in the present and appreciate each moment.
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80 of 84 people found the following review helpful By M. Sullivan on 10 Aug. 2007
Format: Hardcover
I saw the author on BBC Breakfast whilst eating my cornflakes a couple of days ago. The issues he was talking about seemed interesting but accessible to a non-scientist, non-clever-person like me. And yes, it's a very enjoyable read. Simply laid out with each chapter taking you through to another level of how time can be stretched and shrunk depending on your perception and your circumstances. It's a simple idea well explained, illustrated with episodes from Mr Taylor's own life (as well as famous sports stars etc) that make the more clever-er concepts easier to understand. I'd recommend it. Weirdly, it made a train journey go extremely quickly. Which has to be a good thing!
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92 of 97 people found the following review helpful By Jo on 17 Aug. 2007
Format: Hardcover
This book is full of fascinating insights into why we experience the world the way we do, and in particular the way we experience different perceptions of time. It's one of those books which makes you look at familiar things in a new and fresh light. In particular, I was impressed with the section on time in different cultures, that explains why many indigenous peoples don't have any concept of time or any past or future tenses. Oh to live in one of those timeless cultures! But the book does describe how we can become less focused on time, and even transcend it to some extent. A very absorbing and even life-changing book.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rosey Lea TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
This time perception book is written as a 'personal development' book, not a science book. It's very perky, anecdotal and full off "Hey, we all agree on that don't we!" kind of buddy-buddy writing.

The points made are standard stuff (break routines, use new experiences as time markers, engrossing yourself means loss of time senses etc), but there's very little research and evidence beyond the author's own anecdotes - in some cases he even admits they're 'friend-of-a-friend' stories. In short, the author's recommendations for experiencing time are to meditate and move to a different country regularly.

As a book about time perception, it'll do. But there are much better books out there with more facts and fewer personal judgements. For example Time: A User's Guide
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. I. Mackenzie VINE VOICE on 31 Mar. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a well written book on a very interesting (and neglected) topic.
I was largely convinced by his argument about the volume of new information being the key to time passing faster or slower. Although I have to say this doesn't appear to be a particularly startling idea to me, I'm pretty sure most people would have come to this conclusion themselves.

The book get on to dodgier ground where he treats pre-cognition and other psychic phenomena as scientific or proven, the whole area is awash with fakers and he definitely cherry picks the research.

Finally he basically says that the Buddhist techniques of mindfulness and meditation can alter your perception of time and generally improve your life, I won't argue here, I've tried meditation and it seems pretty useful in calming you down.

However the book is a pretty long run for a short slide, you could read the first couple of chapters and the last chapter without much in the way of loss of information. So worth a read, but take some of it with a pinch of salt.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Anon on 4 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
Some very useful info in this book which has definitely clarified my own thoughts. However the "science" is flawed in places. The first few chapters are quite interesting and seemingly written with sound logical reasoning. But as the chapters progress so the scientific analysis becomes increasingly dubious.

For instance, the author says: "Anybody who approaches the evidence for precognition with an open mind will find it very difficult to dismiss" and goes on to list a number of (dubious) case studies which have resulted in successful precognition. However the author fails to mention than countless case studies in which failed to reach such conclusions. Cherry picking results like this is meaningless in scientific analysis. Referencing Stephen Hawking or Einstein does not make the conclusions any more convincing; in fact I found myself questioning the content of the entire book because of the dubious logic employed in the chapter "The Illusion of Time", which is a great pity.

Logical reasoning aside, the book does highlight the interesting concept of time flow, and demonstrates how to manipulate our own thoughts to control our sense of time. The precise way in which the author labels his conclusions is the saving feature. For that it's worth the money.

Read the last two chapters - the remainder can be dismissed.
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