Making Sense of Secondary Science and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £27.99
  • You Save: £8.00 (29%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used Good condition book may have signs of cover wear and/or marks on corners and page edges. Inside pages may have highlighting, writing and underlining. All purchases eligible for Amazon customer service and a 30-day return policy.
Trade in your item
Get a £3.66
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Making Sense of Secondary Science: Research into children's ideas (Studies) Paperback – 10 Mar 1994


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.99
£19.99 £11.93

Trade In Promotion


Frequently Bought Together

Making Sense of Secondary Science: Research into children's ideas (Studies) + Science Learning, Science Teaching + Learning to Teach Science in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience (Learning to Teach Subjects in the Secondary School Series)
Price For All Three: £62.00

Some of these items are dispatched sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £3.66
Trade in Making Sense of Secondary Science: Research into children's ideas (Studies) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.66, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (10 Mar. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415097657
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415097659
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 15.8 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 50,289 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Research on children's ideas of 'living' has been in progress since the 1920s. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 3 July 2002
Format: Paperback
Any teacher who has ever stood in the front of a class teaching science will, at some time, have encountered some amazing misconceptions held by their pupils. These ideas have come from the children's own life experience.
The late Rosalind Driver and her team at the Children's Learning in Science Research Group at Leeds University have put together a book that looks in detail at many of the common misconceptions held by children in the field of science. It looks in detail at how children's understanding changes over time. This understanding, which is closely related to cognitive development, must affect the teaching of science. To teach science without understanding the nature of these misconceptions would be criminal.
This well written book details the research that has been done into the children's misconceptions, but does not suggest how to overcome the misconceptions. However, knowing the misconceptions that are held will enable you the teacher to target you teaching better and so deal with the misconception.
A revealing and sometimes amusing book. No science teacher should be without it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By J. Harter on 20 Mar. 2003
Format: Paperback
I bought this book as a student teacher on the recommendation of my tutors. It is now an integral part of my lesson planning as it enables me to anticipate pupil misconceptions. The book examines childerens ideas about the natural world topic by topic, highlighting some commonly held beliefs (such as plants feeding from soil, air being a pure substance and all metals being attracted to a magnet). In using this book I have become more aware of the misconceptions that pupils (and adults!) hold in their understanding of science and can attempt to challenge these ideas before teaching the scientifically accurate idea.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 10 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
As an NQT, I have found this book very helpful as it focusses on students' common misconceptions and difficulties on science topics. The topics chosen appear to be the ones with the most common problems. If you're teaching a science topic, it's handy to use as a reference so you can pinpoint areas that may need further explanation/clarity. It's also good for coming up with more discerning questions to ensure learning and complete understanding has occurred in the classroom.
I would highly recommend this book to inexperienced teachers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lyndsay Barwell on 3 Dec. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is essentially statements of conclusions of studies. I give three stars because a lot of the information is useful for understanding children's understandings about science. Some of them seem logical and others are surprising. Certainly, this is a useful read for a science teacher so you can catch any misconceptions students are likely to have. It's only three stars because it ends up being quite boring in the end. There is some repetition. As I said above, it is just conclusions of studies. You are left to make your own conclusions about how these facts should impact your teaching.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback