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Making Sense of the ECG: A Hands-On Guide, Fourth Edition Paperback – 4 Jun 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: CRC Press; 4 edition (4 Jun. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1444181823
  • ISBN-13: 978-1444181821
  • Product Dimensions: 24.1 x 18.8 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 35,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

About the Author

Andrew R. Houghton, Consultant Cardiologist, Grantham and District Hospital; Visiting Fellow, University of Lincoln, UK

David Gray, Reader in Medicine and Honorary Consultant Physician, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospital, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Supercritic on 10 May 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Superb book, great service.
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By susan pinder on 24 May 2015
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Excellent
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
Quite the bargain for a very complete EKG/ECG interpretation resource 7 Sept. 2014
By zhabazon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
My first job in the medical field was working for a very prominent Pediatric Cardiologist in San Francisco decades ago. I began as a Medical Transcriber and soon thereafter became his medical assistant and was performing an EKG on each patient, most of whom were referred because of a cardiac anomaly, some who were so tiny the chest leads barely fit without touching each other. Being familiar with the medical terms via his dictation, he helped me learn how to interpret an EKG readout and I had a better understanding of what anomaly was represented in an EKG. I mention this because had I referenced Making Sense of the ECG Fourth Edition with Cases for Self Assessment Second Edition Set: Making Sense of the ECG: A Hands-On Guide, Fourth Edition while learning, I would have known much more than my limited on the job education.

In those days, an EKG machine was operated by attaching straps to the ankles and wrists, then placing the suction cups along the chest in designated spots. A paper strip flew out of the machine and it was up to the professional to interpret the reading, visually and using the tool of a caliper (which I still have). With the anatomical illustrations combined with the resulting readings provided in this book, even a non-professional can learn about the electrical impulses of the heart. What is offered in this book is outstanding and easy to follow. A contemporary reading provides ample measurements for the provider, but using this resource can assist the professional in contemplating referrals to specialist.
Good introductory text 29 Sept. 2014
By JWH - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This manual is a new and welcomed entry in the genre of ECG education. For the absolute novice, I still think Dale Dubin's Rapid Interpretation of EKG's remains the most basic and helpful resource as evidenced by its 4++ star rating on Amazon with nearly 500 reviews (quite a lot for a book with so limited interest). However, Dubin's text is not without its detractors who find the text too simplistic and its author not someone they wish to patronize (Dr Dubin went to jail for rather vile crimes). This book is not as simplistic as the Dubin manuscript, but still approachable for the novice. It contains more useful information than Ferry's Basic Electrocardiography and more practical tips on reading ECGs than Conover's Understanding Electrocardiography. I still think Marriott's Practical Electrocardiography remains the best source for a physician to learn to read ECGs, but find it a bit too complicated for the novice. I have been involved in resident training for several decades and have examined many sources looking for good educational material. I think this book is written at a level which is both approachable to the nonphysician and yet has enough information to be of interest to the physician learner as well. Highly recommended as a quality text in an already crowded field.
Excellent reference Guide as well as primer 8 Oct. 2014
By K. Gilleland - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a solid introduction to ECGs but it's not basic- it does require a firm knowledge of A&P. This would be good for RNs in cardiology, ECG techs, or physicians as a reference- basically any provider that is in the position to get the ECG reading first, so that they know if and how quickly an alerting phone call or referral might be needed.
The discussion of heart physiology is fairly brief, but remarkably quite good. It's followed by ECG basics and lead placement. The rest of the book is pretty much devoted to interpretation and diagnosis. It absolutely teaches one how to get lead placement right and perform ECGs, as well as read them, and correlate readings back to physiology for diagnosis.
The diagnostic pathways are very helpful. It's also helpful the way it is organized into the different ECG segments- for instance, the P wave has a section. If it looks 'weird', that's the section to turn to, and then that section is organized with possible aberrations as subtopics.

The index could have been a bit better as one other poster noted. I was looking for information about inversions and it's not even listed, though I did see a bit in the book. I think it would have been also helpful to have more information about IDing faulty readings.
A well laid out, comprehensive resource 27 Sept. 2014
By flamingo1325 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a really great, comprehensive resource that takes you through everything about ECGs, from how to prepare the patient and where to place the electrodes, to what various heart conditions will look like on the readout. I also really like how it explains what to look for to differentiate between different things, like when symptoms suggest one thing but a specific feature on the ECG will give you the answer of something else. I would consider this pretty much all inclusive, though some of the sections are more brief than others. There's also a troubleshooting type section, which gives examples of abnormalities that don't fit a typical heart problem - and could be from other causes unrelated to the patient's heart. A section about pacemakers is also included.

This book contains a lot of information, however, and is an absolutely wonderful reference tool for physicians, nurses, and anyone else in the medical field, while also being the perfect introductory tool to learn about ECGs for students, or anyone just interested. Though some medical knowledge is needed to really understand the content, a medical degree isn't required to follow what this book goes over.
Clear, concise and useful reference 22 Aug. 2014
By javajunki - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A solid introduction but the brevity sometimes makes it more difficult than it should be; for example, the book does a terrific job explaining how (and why) to properly position each "lead" (and actually distinguishes between the official and generic use of the term "lead"), provides ample yet clear and concise overview for what is being measured, where and the direction/positive/negative etc...
Additionally, just using a generic heart rate example...brady versus tachy cardia (slow versus fast heart rate) the book clearly defines each, promotes common sense clinical signs (observe the condition of the patient to help interpret) and provides several flow charts etc...for use in differentiating various symptoms.
Nearly all commonly encountered cardiac conditions are mentioned although again, some are quite brief such as bradycardia. Additionally, the index was not quite comprehensive. Using bradycardia again, the index only shows 2 pages yet discussion was contained on several additional pages throughout the book.
Despite these relatively minor issues, the book is clear, concise and useful for reference.
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