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Making Things Move DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists Paperback – 1 Jan 2011


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Making Things Move DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists + 507 Mechanical Movements: Mechanisms and Devices + 1800 Mechanical Movements, Devices and Appliances (Dover Science Books)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Tab Electronics (1 Jan. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071741674
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071741675
  • Product Dimensions: 18.8 x 1.8 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 206,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

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Product Description

About the Author

Dustyn Roberts is a mechanical engineer, teacher, author, and perpetual student. She founded a consultancy, Dustyn Robots (www.dustynrobots.com), and developed a course for NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) called Mechanisms and Things That Move. Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, an MS in Biomechanics from the University of Delaware, and is working on a PhD in Mechanical Engineering at NYU-Poly.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By S. D. Spicer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Jun. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So, you've read and understood a basic practical electronics book likeMake: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery or programming an ardiunoGetting Started with Arduino (Make: Projects) and now you want to, as the book says, make things move.

Like the above books, this is an entry to medium level book. If you've struggled with concepts of materials, levers, motors and stuff; this book will give you the keys to open up the techniques and technologies that will help you.

It's very practical, but puts the theory in where it's needed in an understandable way. It's littered with diagrams and real world examples. Fortunately, this is not a book that has loads of pre-digested projects; instead you are given far more useful concepts and principles that you can apply to what it is you want to do.

I'm an artist that makes kinetic sculptures; I'm not a mechanic or a geek. This book was a perfect start and reference book. Recommended.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. Walker on 8 May 2011
Format: Paperback
I have just finished reading this book and I am not sure what to say. I was really excited about this book and the concept behind it. I pre-ordered it from Amazon months before it was on sale and rushed straight into reading it when it finally arrived. The concept behind this book is as the title says... making things move. The book works through a series of different projects that you can make alongside the book. There is even a website to back up the book.

This book would be really good if you have had limited making skills or experience. It works through loads of different concepts such as linkages , leavers, friction etc... For me it was just a bit too been there got the t-shirt. Its not that it is a bad book, it is a really good book! If you have messed around with motors, gears, automata etc.. and are looking for the next step I wouldn't recommend it. However if you are starting off as a `Maker' I would really recommend it!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There doesn't seem to be many other books for this topic so its difficult to compare but overall its okay. I have very little experience of making moving mechanical objects but I have to admit I don't feel I have learn't as much as I expected reading this book. I also found the book lacks inspiration inside; its very well presented but it didn't get my imagination spinning with ideas for projects. I think it will sit on the shelf and act as a good reference book for the future. Its easy to read and follow; you don't need to be technically minded to follow it making it accessible to everyone.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By ep colin on 25 July 2011
Format: Paperback
A typical American format/layout book.
The information is very similar to british school D&T sylabus books
of the last 20 yrs.
However there are 2 excellent chapters on formula,which simplifies
down to a very basic level using sketches.
The chapters using Arduino primer,and stepper motors should take
you towards understanding animatronics better.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 84 reviews
68 of 69 people found the following review helpful
Great book! 5 Dec. 2010
By M. Petit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As a paper engineer and artist with some electronic experience, I have found that learning about gears, pulleys, motors, and the actual mechanics of getting things to move somewhat daunting. There are basic books geared towards beginners as well as books filled with inspiring complex examples that are impossible to navigate unless you already have a high level of expertise. This book is the book I've been looking for. It is really useful and very comprehensive in its approach and scope. It starts with the basics, but, takes you through a wide array of materials, techniques, and examples. Its section on motors (and arduino control) is great. I think its a fantastic book for students and individuals with varying skills, experience, and interests. Highly recommend it.
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic Presentation 27 Dec. 2010
By John M - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm sure the way you respond to this book will depend heavily on your experience level as a mechanical and electronics tinkerer. I happen to be right in the bullseye of the author's target audience: this book is perfect for where I am in my informal education in those areas. My favorite part is that Ms. Roberts makes specific recommendations for tools and for parts and materials sources. The information is presented in a very logical order. It is intentionally not too deep - just the bare essentials to get you started experimenting. But with plenty of information about how to go further. If you want to learn how to build machines that move, this is a great place to start.
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
perfect book for student designers 7 Dec. 2010
By moreecstatic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have been waiting for this book! I teach product design at a local university, and my students often have questions that I can't answer about topics discussed in Making Things Move. The language here is perfectly suited for this purpose, the information is very clear and the example projects are nicely explained and documented. The hand sketches are great, because they capture the excitement of making things, and put one in the mood to start sketching and inventing! Thanks to this author for producing a needed book that will help many non-professional people as they try their hand at mechanical design and robotics.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Great practical intoduction to mechanisms 9 Feb. 2011
By William E. Wagner III - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have a PhD and teach Electronics at a university and this is a great introduction to mechanical movements. Most of my students are interested in robots and this book provides easy to understand explanations and sources for the materials. I have also helped FIRST Robotics teams and again this is a great reference. I was also impressed with the projects in the book. These would make great starting points for science fair projects or class room demonstrations. Each of the many topics is covered in enough depth to cover the basics with references listed to find more information. Many examples are given of actual parts with detailed descriptions of the specification sheets.

I did notice one mistake. On page 101 of the paperback version, it says that alternating current fluctuates between 0V and 120V. It actually fluctuates from about 169 V below ground to 169 V above ground. It supplies the same average power as a 120 V DC source, which is why it is called 120 V AC. This is a minor mistake in an otherwise great book.
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Amazing book 31 Dec. 2010
By Djair Guilherme - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book that really delivers what it promises. Excellent reference material. I had never learned physics in a way as interesting as the one presented by the author. Recommend.
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