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Mahler: Das klagende Lied / Berg: Lulu-Suite [+digital booklet]
 
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Mahler: Das klagende Lied / Berg: Lulu-Suite [+digital booklet]

16 April 2014 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Digital Booklet: Mahler: Das klagende Lied / Berg: Lulu-Suite
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2011
  • Release Date: 16 April 2014
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:04:25
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00JR9LMSY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Mar. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
By overwhelming popular demand-by which I mean I was overwhelmed by the kind comments of a few "populars", I have again taken the plunge and returned to reviewing. Fingers crossed!
This new release sees Boulez on familiar ground-his was the second stereo recording of the early Mahler work way back in 1969 (Wyn Morris on Delysé was the first) and he still plays the revised version which eschews the "Prologue" entitled Waldmärchen. Berg is also second nature to Boulez, so with this orchestra we had every reason to expect superb results. It's not quite the case. In his earlier recording with the LSO, the broad tempi for the opening were full of foreboding and the orchestra positively shrieked demonically on the final chords before the horn chorale entered. I was shocked by the brisk tempo and lack of dramatic emphasis adopted by Boulez in this performance-the opening passes in a very matter of fact manner, and there is little or none of the gradations the piece needs or that we expect.
There is a great deal of charming woodwind detail and solo string passages uncovered, but the whole of the first part passes as a rather charming chamber-like piece with none of the Wagnerian grandeur that Mahler intended.
This is emphasised by the recording, made live in the Grosses Festspielhaus Salzburg in 2011, and it is not one of DG's best I'm afraid to say. It's VERY close miked, with soloists in your face and the orchestra not far behind. Worse, at times the mikes only appear to be catching the front 2 rows of the first and second violins, split antiphonally as ever with this great band. Thus, we have rather thin and scratchy string tone by VPO standards-not a disaster but far from ideal.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Entartete Musik on 27 Mar. 2013
Format: Audio CD
Boulez's Mahler is full of revelations. One could easily view him as a surgeon, aware of every sinew and synapse in what lies in front of him. Yet this latest addition to Boulez's discography (recorded at the 2011 Salzburg Festival) is a sound retort to any such charges of analytical detachment. Presenting two works from either end of the Viennese post-Romantic spectrum, Boulez delivers a musical mirror in which expectations are reversed and new colours emerge, eliciting superb results from the Vienna Philharmonic.

The revised and abbreviated 1898 version of Mahler's Das klangende Lied thrives under Boulez's attentive baton. The early part of the cantata teems with sylvan life, from which Anna Larsson, Dorothea Röschmann and Johan Botha emerge as a luscious trio of soloists. Balancing these qualities, Boulez brings clarity to the natural honeyed warmth of the Vienna Philharmonic. Indeed, both the orchestra and the Wiener Staatsopernchor are remarkably fresh in this unmistakably youthful work. Yet Boulez never short changes theatrical thrills and spills, even occasionally teetering on the bullish. Röschmann's 'Ach Bruder, lieber Bruder mein', however, provides a suitably plangent epilogue, foretelling Mahler's later greater elegies.

Berg's Lulu comes at the end of the Viennese tradition sparked by Mahler. Boulez was, of course, in the vanguard establishing the three act version of the opera; his 1979 recording is still a benchmark interpretation. Three decades on and paired with Das klagende Lied, Boulez's approach with Berg's preliminary suite is more Mahlerian. There's still the same incisive clarity within the textures, but there's also a new yearning tone, which suits the Viennese perfectly. It makes you long for a complete performance, preferably with Anna Prohaska's silky vocal presence in the title-role.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tintagel on 28 Mar. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Despite owning nearly 3000 CDs I have very little Berg and I had not hear a note of 'Lulu' before getting this disc. I am not really in a great position to compare this version of Lulu to others, therefore, but I seriously enjoyed it on its own terms. The orchestral colouring is given a real glow by the Vienna Philharmonic, and the extraordinary vocal gymnastics have to heard to be believed. Vocal and orchestral balances are close, but such is the beauty of the playing and singing that I was rather glad to be given the conductor's eye view.

I am much, much more familiar with the Mahler, though almost all versions that I have include the Prologue that is absent from Mahler's revision and this new version. To be honest this shouldn't put buyers off, though, because much of the music reappears in the two movements of the final version, and the story is recanted by the Spielmann too (the whole point of the drama!). Although Larsson's sound seems to be a little 'tubby' these days I would say that I was more than happy with the vocal performances. The choral singing is brilliantly done, with only some small sections lost in th melee. The wedding section is thrilling in its visceral impact, and the offstage bands really do stick in the memory. Boulez drives the whole things forward when he needs to, but the chilling atmosphere created by the ghostly flute voice is given plenty of space to breathe. I found myself holding my breath at several points.

To be honest I really do love the Chailly version of the original version and wouldn't part with it, but this is more than good enough if you are looking to hear the work for the first time. I would suggest that the coupling will challenge some, but why not give that a whirl too?
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