Mahler: Symphony No.3 has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by tunesonline
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: CDs, DVDs, Videogames, LPs & more! Fast shipping! All items guaranteed!
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£26.92
& FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £12.99

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Mahler: Symphony No.3
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Mahler: Symphony No.3


Price: £26.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by skyvo-direct and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
19 new from £11.16 8 used from £6.68
£26.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by skyvo-direct and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's New York Philharmonic Store

Visit Amazon's New York Philharmonic Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Mahler: Symphony No.3 + Mahler: Symphony No. 6
Price For Both: £38.12

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Composer: Gustav Mahler
  • Audio CD (14 April 1997)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B000001GAG
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 188,711 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. Kräftig. EntscheidenLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:41£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Immer das gleiche TempoLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Tempo ILeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:45£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Zeit lassenLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:15£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Zeit lassenLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:08£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Immer dasselbe Tempo. (Marsch.) Nicht eilenLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:11£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Im alten Marschtempo (Allegro Moderato)Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:35£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 1 - 1. - Tempo ILeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:54£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 2. Tempo di minuetto. Sehr mäßigLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:13£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 2. - L'istesso tempoLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 1:03£0.39  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 2. - A tempo. (Wie im Anfang)Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:42£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 2. - Ganz ploetzlich gemaechlich. Tempo di MenuettoLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:37£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 3. Comodo. Scherzando. Ohne HastLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:42£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 3.- Wieder sehr gemaechlich, wie zu AnfangLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:57£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 3.- Etwas zurueckhaltendLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:33£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 3.- Schnell und schmetternd wie eine Fanfare - Tempo I. Mit geheimnisvoller HastLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:47£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 3.- Wieder sehr gemaechlich, beinahe langsamLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:32£0.79  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 4. Sehr langsam. Misterioso ppp - "O Mensch! Gib acht"Christa Ludwig and Leonard Bernstein and New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:48£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 4.- Più mosso subitoLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:44£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 5. Lustig im Tempo und keck im Ausdruck: "Bimm Bamm. Es sungen drei Engel"Brooklyn Boys Chorus and Christa Ludwig and James McCarthy and Joseph Flummerfelt and Leonard Bernstein and New York Choral Artists and New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:04£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 6. Langsam. Ruhevoll. EmpfundenLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:03£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 6.- Nicht mehr so breitLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:36£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 6.- Tempo I. RuhevollLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:44£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 6.- Nicht mehr so breitLeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:35£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 6.- Tempo ILeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:17£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Mahler: Symphony No.3 in D minor / Part 2 - 6.- Langsam. Tempo ILeonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra 7:41£0.79  Buy MP3 

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By rjmcr on 18 Oct. 2009
Format: Audio CD
The pinnacle of his earlier CBS cycle, Bernstein has always had a special way with Mahler's Third and he has lost none of his control or vision over the years.

He dispatches the first movement with an elemental power and almost reckless virtuosity, with no attempt to 'civilise' the rabble as 'Summer marches in'; he revels in it, in fact. The second and third movements are full of charm and vivid characterisation with alert and colourful playing from the NYPO. The fourth movement Nietzsche song is as lost to the world as it should be, with the legendary Christa Ludwig an unsurpassed soloist, and the morning bells chorus of the fifth is lively and bright with a good balance between the ladies and the rather feisty sounding boys. Bernstein then unfolds a sumptuous and deeply romantic account of the great adagio finale, with wonderfully fervent string playing and rich, glowing brass. The cumulative power of the orchestra in the final bars is magisterial and incredibly satisfying.

In fact, the playing of the NYPO throughout is the great glory of this set. It was the last time they recorded Mahler with Bernstein (he died before recording the Eighth with them to complete his second cycle) and it is a superb tribute to a remarkable musical partnership.

DG have improved on their earlier handling of Avery Fisher Hall's difficult acoustic although it still sounds a little unnaturally rich and resonant.

Nevertheless, this is still as fine a Mahler Third as you could hope to find.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 10 Jun. 2014
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the broadest and grandest recordings of this symphony in the catalogue. The sound is very fine if occasionally just a little coarse and tubby but it captures the concentration of a live performance and the balance of instruments is excellent. There is virtually no extraneous or audience noise, apart from a little grunting from the Maestro. This was a favourite symphony for Bernstein and he chose it for his farewell concert 25 years after his debut as Music Director of the orchestra here.

It is weighty but never ponderous; the Scherzo is especially released and exuberant and the Brooklyn Boys' Chorus is almost unruly in its attack, which creates a robust effect far preferable to the prissiness which affects some renderings. The playing of the New York Philharmonic is especially commendable and if anything superior to the earlier, 1961 recording, just as Christa Ludwig is preferable to Martha Lipton.

Bernstein's noble restraint in the opening of the finale pays off as he keeps his powder dry for the cataclysmic climax; this builds and builds through 28 minutes. Only Maazel takes as long in what is for me an almost equally recommendable recording with the VPO and certainly other outstanding performances are less overtly affectionate, starting with Tennstedt's searing, but comparatively brisk live account, Sinopoli in Stuttgart, Mehta and Abbado's earliest recording with the VPO. These are all wonderful recordings as this symphony has been fortunate on records but there is no denying Bernstein's ability to generate a special kind of intensity. Alongside the First and the Ninth this is probably the finest and the most typical of his recordings in the second cycle.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Scriabinmahler TOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 Dec. 2007
Format: Audio CD
Bernstein's 60s' recording of the 3rd symphony is outstanding in many ways, but this DG version is even greater for its massive and explosive climaxes, and the more broadly paced last movement played with deeper feeling and enormous ending.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 25 reviews
31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
A Mahler's Third for the ages 9 Aug. 2003
By A. Michaelson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Third is a very difficult piece to play and understand. Not only is the longest symphony in the standard repetoire, it also showcases Mahler's desire to show the entire universe in a symphony. There are more contrasts between light and dark, happy and sad, loud and soft, fast and slow, etc, in this symphony than in any other Mahler symphony. It makes this symphony a very difficult piece to listen to, and perhaps Mahler's most inaccessible for the casual listener or Mahler novice. That said, one must still agree that Bernstein gives this symphony a reading that is simply unforgettable. Bernstein manages emphasize the essential contrasting elements of the music, especially in the seemingly endless first movement, and keep the listener at the edge of his seat from the tension and emotion Bernstein elicits. Plus, this recording has excellent sound. Some of the best I've heard, in fact. The explosions are more explosive than in any other recording I've heard. It's something you have got to hear for yourself! I've grown to love this symphony and now it's one of my favorites; however, without this recording, who knows how positively I'd feel about this difficult (yet very fulfilling) composition.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Ideal 29 Nov. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is my favorite recording of Mahler's Third, which of all the symphonies gives perhaps the most indelible impression of Mahler the God-seeker and all-encompasser. The tempos and ensemble work are perfect throughout. There are none of the mannerisms that sometimes mar Bernstein's late interpretations of the Symphonies, and both conductor and orchestra show a perfect affinity for this difficult music. Never have I gotten so lost in golden reverie as in the third movement during the posthorn episodes, and the moving finale, a true vision of heaven, is perfectly paced.
If at first you don't quite "get" what Mahler was driving at, keep listening and you'll be won over. The first, second, and fifth movements might seem to lag in interest at first, but they come on strong with increasing familiarity.
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Mahler's other masterpiece. 20 Jun. 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Third Symphony is the biggest of the ten (in length, at least), and, it seems to me, probably the least performed. Whether that has to do with it's duration (100+ minutes) I'm not sure, but it is surely one of Mahler's most magnificent works. Leonard Bernstein is the Mahler Master, if there ever was just one, and the New York Philharmonic is as great a Mahler orchestra as any, especially with Lenny. The first movement is a bear; more than twice as long as the second and third movements combined. The Philharmonic performs splendidly through the section, culminating in a very energetic flourish. The third movement is harrowingly ironic, and Ludwig sings the fourth as darkly as anyone. The fifth movement, with it's treble choirs (female & children's voices) stands in stark contrast to the preceding one with it's up-beatness. The massive 6th movement is one of Mahler's finest creations: a solemn, religious Adagio that evolves from a gorgeous melody into a glorious hymn. It's something you have to hear, rather than read about.
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Mahler creates a massive world... 8 Aug. 2005
By ewomack - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
What a huge symphony. It's enormous. Both discs of this recording together run approximately an hour and forty-five minutes (64'12 + 41'40). Throughout this seemingly impossible span the melodic themes intertwine like celtic knots, the dynamics range from a whisper to a SCREAM, and along the way we meet Friedrich Nietzsche, a solo vocalist, and a boys choir. Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic pelt this one out with gusto, but some listeners have complained that Berstein meddles too much with the production (the symphony does balance on the fence of melodrama in places, and a steady guide needs to keep it from tipping into the mushy goo on the wrong side). The recording overflows with full lush strings and horns throughout giving it a very dramatic texture. It's not a piece or a recording suited for background music. It demands attention.

Six movements (in two parts) spontaneously and linearly create Mahler's symphonic world. Mahler originally drew up program notes to go along with the work's multifarious parts (with titles such as "Pan Awakes", "What the Animals in the Forest Tell me", "What the Angels Tell me", and "What Love Tells me"), but he later abandoned them as too stringent. He didn't want to shove his interpretation down the throats of his audience and stifle the carte blanche experience of listening.

The first movement (composed in 1896, a year after the following five movements) opens with a triumphal imposing horn blasting melody. Allusions to Brahms and Wagner lurk beneath the melodies and harmonies. The movement itself is as dynamic as the entire structure of the symphony. From loud and garrulous to near silence, the movement marches and trunches forth while throwing some diversions here and there along with some lovely solo violin speckles. This movement alone makes up Part I of the symphony. The remaining movements make up Part II.

The second movement opens in great contrast to the first. A lonely but danceable horn melody leads us into a beautiful minuet which later transforms into downright danceable and bouncy music. It eventually flutters out with strings.

Next, in the third movement, some shades of the "nature sounds" of Mahler's first return. A "cuckoo" whistles and the orchestra performs some dramatic loopty-loops before breaking out into full song. Musical hints of birds flitter everywhere in this movement. It ends with a clenching creshendo buildup and finally with an unmistakable, almost shocking, bang.

Over an hour of music passes between the beginning of the work and the first vocal movement (the fourth). Here Mahler puts to music the "Midnight Song" from Nietzsche's "Thus Spake Zarathustra". Following the bang of the previous movement, Mahler treats us to a tense painfully beautiful song. Nietzsche was still alive while Mahler composed this symphony, though he had fallen into his "famous" madness (he died in 1900). Mahler also apparently had some regard for Nietzsche -at one point he was going to name the entire symphony after Nietzsche's 1882 work "The Gay Science".

Once again, in great contrast, the next song (and the work's shortest movement at only slightly over 4 minutes) gives off a joyous feeling. The boy choir even chants happy bell sounds.

And then the big finale. The sixth and final movement. A painfully beautiful buildup of some twenty minutes brimming with juicy strings and a few explosions precedes the final thumping drums and majestic climax. It contrasts greatly with the symphony's first mostly raucous movement. And here's another of Mahler's big endings. The sixth movement as a whole provides a stunning conclusion to the piece.

Mahler's Third Symphony is simply overwhelming. It's as difficult to get one's mind around as it is to get one's arms around an aircraft carrier. It's a hulk, a behemoth. But it's also amazing and more than worth the numerous listens required for the symphony to begin to reveal its nuances and hidden gems. Did Mahler attempt to reflect life itself in this gargantuan work? Does that explain its complexity and size? Possibly, but regardless of how one interprets it, the work is full of great Mahlerian music that doesn't require picky granular analysis to enjoy.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
In Every Sense Of The Term, A World Record Work & Performance 3 April 2010
By Erik North - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Symphony No. 3 holds a distinction that no other work of classical music holds, that of being in the Guinness Book of World Records. The reason? Of all the symphonies in the active classical music repertoire, this is by far the longest, with an average performance time that routinely crosses the 100-minute barrier. Other works, including Schoenberg's "Gurrelieder", exceed this; but in the symphonic realm, this is one record that is unlikely ever to be broken. Every conceivable single kind of human, natural, physical, and spiritual emotion that has ever existed can be found in this gargantuan six-movement work, which incorporates material not only from Mahler's "Des Knaben Wunderhorn" song cycle, but also the Night Wanderer's Song of Nietzsche's "Also Sprach Zarathustra" (which would spur Richard Strauss on to compose his symphonic tone poem). Not surprisingly, the requirements for this work are mind breaking: a huge orchestra, a standard four-part chorus, a children's chorus, and a mezzo-soprano soloist. That, and a conductor capable of handling it all without collapsing on the podium. This, of course, is where Leonard Bernstein and his New York Philharmonic Orchestra come into play.

This recording of the Mahler Third, made before a live audience at Avery Fisher Hall in August 1986, more than lives up to this work's Guinness Book reputation; and in fact, because of Bernstein's typically immense conducting and (arguably) ultra-slow tempos, it is also perhaps the single longest recording of any symphony, Mahler or otherwise, anywhere on the planet, clocking in at close to 106 minutes, from the portentous horn-dominated opening bars to the tension-releasing conclusion in D Major. Bernstein, as always when it comes to Mahler, makes the journey an adventure of the highest order; indeed, for Los Angeles music critic Mark Swed, who was there on that August night in '86, he claims he left Avery Fisher Hall literally talking to himself. Listening to this recording, it's not too hard to see why, as Bernstein marshals seemingly everything he knows about conducting into this performance. He is ably assisted by the legendary German mezzo-soprano Christa Ludwig, the New York Choral Artists, and the Brooklyn Boys Choir in this endeavor, along with contributions from posthorn soloist Philip Smith, trombonist Joseph Alessi, and violinist and concertmaster Glenn Dichterow. Bernstein clearly set the bar for Mahler performances from the 1960s onwards, and if ever there was an example of this dictum, it is right here. No matter how controversial Lenny was in conducting Mahler (and make no mistake, he was and still is controversial for many), there can be little doubt of the affinity he had for Mahler. One need only look here for absolute proof of that.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback