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Mahler: Symphony No.10


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Product details

  • Orchestra: Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: Sir Simon Rattle
  • Composer: Gustav Mahler
  • Audio CD (24 Feb 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: EMI Classics
  • ASIN: B000002RSN
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 35,337 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Symphony No. 10 In F Sharp: I. Adagio
2. Symphony No. 10 In F Sharp: II. Scherzo
3. Symphony No. 10 In F Sharp: III. Purgatorio (Allegro Moderato)
4. Symphony No. 10 In F Sharp: IV. (Scherzo)
5. Symphony No. 10 In F Sharp: V. Finale

Product Description

Product Description

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Amazon.co.uk

This was one of Simon Rattle's first major recordings, made before he became music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, and it remains one of his best interpretively. He leads a viscerally exciting performance of Mahler's 10th Symphony, which incorporates some changes made to Deryck Cooke's final performing version of the unfinished score. Some of these (the cymbal crash at the end of the second movement) are successful, and others (the extra percussion at the climax of the finale) are less so. What's abundantly clear is that the Bournemouth string players are having a hell of time coping with Mahler's and Cooke's merciless demands, but the sense of strain is, arguably, part of the musical message. Rattle is a musician who has consistently failed to live up to his promise, on disc, at least, and it's salutary to recall just how refreshing a conductor he was before a mindlessly adoring English press immunised him against constructive self-criticism and stunted his artistic growth. --David Hurwitz

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Stuart C. Clarke on 1 Jan 2009
I must say I was astounded when I read David Hurwitz's splenetic and rather personal criticisms of Rattle at the end of his overview of this disc. Did Rattle push in on him once at last orders in the Barbican or is he just another of that species of British music critic who have always resented SR's phenomenal success? I was a student with a cheapo season ticket for the CBSO in the early eighties and I can tell you without hesitation that in those years both Rattle and Neeme Jarvi were working hard on their craft - and learning many lessons. But even then there was an obvious and identifiable 'Rattle sound' and a sense that a voyage of discovery was beginning. And of course all this is obvious from the discs released by the Rattle/CBSO combine subsequently, in the time before his appointment in Berlin - and believe me Mr Hurwitz, you don't get in there just because the Daily Mail happens to like you: no, you have to display some very special talent, determination and potential. Incidentally, what does 'fulfilled' promise really look like - and whom do you have in mind as an example?

Of course, this recording dates from before all of that, but it had been a cause celebre/obsession for Rattle from his student days and in this case there's little doubt that his deep knowledge of the score and clear idea of how he wanted it to sound got through to the players at Bournemouth along with a sense of passionate commitment and excitement. This recording captures the feelings of nihilism, despair and anguish involved perfectly whereas the later Berlin account is too 'civilised' and thickly recorded for my taste - the view of one who's moved on from youth and finds that his old jeans no longer fit.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. J. Bonsor VINE VOICE on 4 Aug 2007
What an opportunity Bournemouth missed in not snapping up Rattle when they had the chance!!
This recording was made when Simon Rattle was undertaking his engagements with the BSO as the winner of the Rupert Foundation Conductor's competition, and it shows that he had the vision and command of the orchestra right from the start.
Rattle has always said that his view of Mahler's symphonies has taken a while to evolve- especially the Fifth. However, his interpretation of Mahler 10 must have sprung up fully formed.
This is still the benchmark recording, despite his later, super-polished BPO version: the emotions are raw and the solo flute of the last movement transcendent as no other reading of this piece: Wigglesworth- Pah!
Listen on your own, on high volume, and don't be afraid of tears.
Highly recommended.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Jun 2004
This is one of the greatest Mahler recordings ever - including those of Bruno Walter. Get the Faber full score and follow this huge masterpiece - surely one of the greatest achievements in all music. Please don't bother with the later Rattle recording - it is nowhere near as good. Heartbreaking stuff but surely one of the pinnacles of humanity. In short, its rather good!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Darkling Thrush on 15 Jun 2004
I feel I must point out that David Hurwitz' Amazon review in some parts is wholly inaccurate. The subject of extra percussion is mentioned in the finale. Mr Hurwitz - please, if you can look at Mahler's original sketch - you will see you are completely in error. Cooke made some amendments to his performing version after discussion with Mrs Mahler in the 1960s. Likewise I think you'll find some changes to Cooke's score were made by the tragically underrated conductor Berthold Goldschmidt - but with Cooke's approval, and that of Mrs Mahler. The changes in percussion are back to Mahler's sketch. You could also consult the brilliant Matthews brothers on this.
As for your rather pusillanimous and obviously ill-informed criticism of Rattle - I'll just say that your ear is obviously 'off'. There are therapists for this - I suggest you find one without delay.
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