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Mahler : Symphony 5/Das Lied von der Erde
 
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Mahler : Symphony 5/Das Lied von der Erde

Klaus Tennstedt/Agnes Baltsa/Klaus König/London Philharmonic Orchestra
28 Nov. 2005 | Format: MP3

£17.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
13:53
30
2
15:18
30
3
18:12
30
4
11:55
30
5
16:18
Disc 2
30
1
9:48
30
2
9:59
30
3
3:12
30
4
7:34
30
5
4:50
30
6
31:28
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Sept. 2001
  • Release Date: 28 Nov. 2005
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Warner Classics
  • Copyright: c 2001 EMI Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:22:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IP595M
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 205,318 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amadeus 888 on 7 Oct. 2004
Format: Audio CD
A few words about the "Das Lied von der Erde" (The Song of the Earth): much about this piece of work by Mahler has been covered elsewhere (see other recordings of this work). The only thing I would like to say is that I have listened to the Bernstein/Dieskau, Joachum/Merriman/Haefliger, Walter/Ferrier recordings of the same work (a personal favourite), but for me Tennstedt's version surpasses them all in many individual respects and also as a whole. The orchestra is magnificent, the sound pure and crystal clear and Baltsa's interpretation first class and in many respects equal or even better than the legendary versions of Ferrier or Merriman for example. She bypasses the theatricality that you find in Ferrier or Dieskau, and her pronunciation of German is plain ok, but she turns this to her advantage: not having to 'act' the lyrics, Baltsa delivers a pure, ethereal performance, where you can almost *feel* the poetry even if you don't speak a word of German: "...The dear earth everywhere blossoms in spring and grows green again! Everywhere and eternally the distance shines bright and blue! Eternally... eternally...'..."
"O beauty: O eternal love-and-life-intoxicated world!" This is the Song of the Earth's *Glory*.
Thank you Mr. Tennstedt.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Musica Vita on 6 Feb. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It is difficult if not impossible to achieve the ideal performance of Mahler's Fifth. But Tennstedt comes very close in this recording. He understands the "Mahler sound" like few other conductors and brings to brilliant life this very wide-ranging music. The overall theme of the symphony is "darkness into light" and he masterfully illustrates this. My favourite movement from this work is the Scherzo and Tennstedt's reading is superb. I have never heard the horn climax about five minutes into the movement, which makes me think of sounds of nature echoing around mountain chasms, done so well.

I have only heard a few other recordings often enough to make a comparison, but in my opinion Tennstedt is superior to Solti (brash) Barbirolli (polite) and Bernstein (sentimental), although these versions still have much to commend them. The originally analogue recording is first-class.

I cannot add much to the previous review of Das Lied von der Erde, but in contrast to the symphony this is a "light into darkness" work and here the darkness descends very ominously and finally in the last movement. The recording sounds slightly muddy, which is surprising considering it is an all-digital production from the 90s.

At its current price from Amazon Markets, this two-disc set beats all comers for a combination of value and musical quality. But anyone just wanting Das Lied should at least hear Klemperer's version with the magnificent singing of Fritz Wunderlich and Christa Ludwig before deciding.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
The Song of the Earth's Glory 7 Oct. 2004
By Amadeus 888 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
A few words about the "Das Lied von der Erde" (The Song of the Earth): much about this piece of work by Mahler has been covered elsewhere (see other recordings of this work). The only thing I would like to say is that I have listened to the Bernstein/Dieskau, Joachum/Merriman/Haefliger, Walter/Ferrier recordings of the same work (a personal favourite), but for me Tennstedt's version surpasses them all in many individual respects and also as a whole. The orchestra is magnificent, the sound pure and crystal clear and Baltsa's interpretation first class and in many respects equal or even better than the legendary versions of Ferrier or Merriman for example. She bypasses the theatricality that you find in Ferrier or Dieskau, and her pronunciation of German is plain ok, but she turns this to her advantage: not having to 'act' the lyrics, Baltsa delivers a pure, ethereal performance, where you can almost *feel* the poetry even if you don't speak a word of German: "...The dear earth everywhere blossoms in spring and grows green again! Everywhere and eternally the distance shines bright and blue! Eternally... eternally...'..."

"O beauty: O eternal love-and-life-intoxicated world!" This is the Song of the Earth's *Glory*.

Thank you Mr. Tennstedt.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A gripping Mahler Fifth, but the singing in Das Lied is a letdown 10 Aug. 2006
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
EMI has released Klaus Tennstedt's Mahler cycle in a series of bargain two-fers. This one features the Fifth Sym. in a performance that the Gramophone reviewer thought wasclose to self-parody at times. What he meant is that Tennstedt, an intensely romantic conductor, only clicked with music in the moment, when he could unleash every ounce of feeling. His style featured a great deal of dramatic contrast and tempo change. No matter how free Tennstedt might be with the letter of the score, he tried to channel Mahler's spirit as much as Bernstien did.

Becasue it is so personal, some listeners find this a great Mahler Fifth. Yet there's an equally intense recording from Rudolf Schwarz, an equally personal one from Barbirolli, and quite a few that are much better played (Karajan, Abbado, Solti, Levine). For me, the tightrope act works; I was riveted by Tennstedt's passion, although I wish he didn't drag out the Adagietto to nearly 12 min. (it is beautifully phrased, though). The weakest movement is the finale, which plods.

Tennstedt's Das Lied von der Erde became a top choice with the Good CD Guide from Britain for some years, which is quite odd given that the beefy-sounding tenor, Klaus Konig, shouts his way through. Agnes Baltsa is better, but German is foreign to this Greek mezzo, and you get the feeling that the text means nothing to her--she's doing a very good day's work putting the notes across. I wasn't moved for a moment, but instead found myself listening only to Tennstedt. He goes his own way with the magnificent orchestral part, so if you don't mind hearing Das Lied without voices, there are some fascinating things in this reading.
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