Watch now

Quantity:1
Mahler [DVD] has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Mahler [DVD]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Mahler [DVD]

24 customer reviews

Price: £10.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
24 new from £9.33 3 used from £7.99 1 collectible from £19.38

LOVEFiLM By Post

Rent Mahler on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£10.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Mahler [DVD] + The Music Lovers 1970 DVD + The Devils (Special Edition) [DVD] [1971]
Price For All Three: £31.13

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Robert Powell, Georgina Hale, Lee Montague
  • Directors: Ken Russell
  • Format: Anamorphic, Dolby, PAL, Widescreen
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Odeon Entertainment Ltd
  • DVD Release Date: 23 Jan. 2012
  • Run Time: 111 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B006FZLDT6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 27,612 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Following the recent death of the revolutionary and iconoclastic film director Ken Russell, film fans will once again have the opportunity of viewing one of his critically acclaimed films with the release of Mahler in its correct aspect ratio for the first time ever in 2012. From its stunning opening sequence, featuring Georgina Hale (who plays the wife of Gustav Mahler in this Ken Russell film) isolated in full mummy wrap and writhing with erotic yearning to the lush strains of her husband's music, Mahler distinguishes itself as the most poetic and archetypal of Russell's great-composer works. A kind of cinematic response to Luchino Visconti's 1971 adaptation of Death in Venice, in which Dirk Bogarde plays a Mahler-esque composer in search of beauty in the plague-filled city, Mahler stars Robert Powell as the great Jewish romantic from 19th-century Vienna, drafting enormous symphonic works in the midst of rising anti-Semitism. Converting to Christianity as a means of survival, Mahler carries on with his work but experiences an erosion of his health and sense of identity. Meanwhile, his self-effacing spouse represses her own creative drives to keep the resident genius afloat, plugging every leak and receding all but invisible into the woodwork. While the film is the least ostentatious of Russell's movies about music, it is hardly conventional--a mix of lyrical tableaux and comic fantasy that adds up to a stirring, dream-like experience.

From Amazon.co.uk

From its stunning opening sequence, featuring Georgina Hale (who plays the wife of Gustav Mahler in this Ken Russell film) isolated in full mummy wrap and writhing with erotic yearning to the lush strains of her husband's music, Mahler distinguishes itself as the most poetic and archetypal of Russell's great-composer works. A kind of cinematic response to Luchino Visconti's 1971 adaptation of Death in Venice, in which Dirk Bogarde plays a Mahler-esque composer in search of beauty in the plague-filled city, Mahler stars Robert Powell as the great Jewish romantic from 19th-century Vienna, drafting enormous symphonic works in the midst of rising anti-Semitism. Converting to Christianity as a means of survival, Mahler carries on with his work but experiences an erosion of his health and sense of identity. Meanwhile, his self-effacing spouse represses her own creative drives to keep the resident genius afloat, plugging every leak and receding all but invisible into the woodwork. While the film is the least ostentatious of Russell's movies about music, it is hardly conventional--a mix of lyrical tableaux and comic fantasy that adds up to a stirring, dream-like experience. --Tom Keogh --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By John on 9 Mar. 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a DVD of the famous Ken Russell Mahler film.The film is a classic and speaks for itself so no review of the creation is necessary from me. However there is a big problem with the DVD. It seems to be distributed and supplied by a foreign company (Dutch I think) who have added Dutch subtitles.Unfortunately there does not appear to be any menu or other means of getting rid of the subtitles which for an English person watching an English film is annoying to say the least.It prevents what would otherwise be afive star rating.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Film Buff on 2 Sept. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Maverick British director Ken Russell made his name in the 60s at the BBC where he made several very good biopics of famous composers such as Delius, Debussy, Elgar and Richard Strauss. He continued in the same vein with full length features like The Music Lovers (Tchaikovsky) and Lizstomania (Liszt and Wagner). His most successful venture (as Russell himself averred) was undoubtedly Mahler (1974) in which for once his flamboyant visual excess is perfectly married with the opulent post-romanticism of his subject.

Gustav Mahler was an Austrian composer who was more famous as a conductor when he was alive, his music suffering half a century of neglect before the 1960s Mahler boom exploded courtesy of Leonard Bernstein's CBS recordings of the complete symphonies and song cycles. This was quickly followed by Luchino Visconti's Thomas Mann adaptation, Death in Venice (1971) in which the writer Gustav von Aschenbach is replaced by the composer and the film is consequently swamped with Mahler's music (particularly the adagietto from the fifth symphony). Russell's cheeky little biopic is a direct reply to Visconti's stuffy pretension in that Mahler's life is depicted in a series of fanciful and extremely funny flashbacks which play on different themes that wound through his life and seek to interpret the music itself.

The film is structured around Mahler (Robert Powell) journeying by train back to Vienna with his wife Alma (Georgina Hale) and the flashbacks show us his childhood where we encounter his violent inn keeper father (Lee Montague) who beats him up to the sound of the brass band of a nearby military barracks, and his escape into the surrounding woods to discover the sounds of nature. Military marches and the sounds of Mother nature permeate all of Mahler's music.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
55 of 65 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Redfearn TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 Oct. 2006
Format: DVD
Although Ken Russell was known as an admirer of the music of Gustav Mahler, I wasnt quite sure what he was trying to achieve here. Mahler's life was extremely complex, especially during his formative years as a composer and conductor in Vienna and in New York where he established himself as one of the all time great conductors despite many enemies and jealous rivals. Although he did have many admirers such as Bruno Walter and Erich Wolfgang Korngold. However, none of this is explored in the film. What the film does explore is his complex marriage to the beautiful Alma who bore him two daughters, one of whom died very young.

Alma who was much younger than Gustav when they married was a complex woman in her own right. They are often seen at loggerheads over his musical style which irritated her through her lack of understanding what Mahler was hoping to achieve and that was to bring a new style of music to the 20thC. The film takes place on a train journey with Mahler, now nearing to the end of his short life, (he was only 50 when he died of a throat infection which weakened his heart)is looking back on his career as a composer and conductor. Moreover, the relationship between him and his wife Alma is strained by Mahler's knowledge of her numerous affairs which are highlighted during certain scenes in the film. Indeed, the marriage only survived due to Mahler's intense love for her. However, his anguish at knowing of Alma's infidelity is highlighted by his later compositions especially with the unfinished Tenth Symphony which is one of his most advanced works and also one of his most emotionally profound.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I first saw this film not long after it came out some forty years ago. I've wanted to get a copy for some time and so was delighted to see it available on DVD from Amazon.

It is important to realise that this is a Ken Russell film and not a docudrama. And so license is taken with some of the historical information for dramatic purposes. But his does not detract from the overall effect.

The film takes as it's basis a rail journey by Mahler to Vienna (his last?) with his wife Alma. This punctuates a series of flashbacks and dream sequences that provide insights into the man and, more particularly, his music.

The music is not all Mahler's. There is a sexually explicit extract from Wagner's Tristan und Isolde and also a parody using the Ride of the Walkyries on Mahler's (pragmatic?) conversion to Roman Catholicism.

Another central theme is the failing relationship between Gustav and Alma and the emergence of Max Gropius on the scene. Aspects of this, particularly Alma's composing aspirations (actually appreciated by Gustav when it was too late), are not handled all that well.

But overall, as an attempt to provide some insights into Mahler's wonderful music, the film is worth watching.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback