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Mahler: Complete Edition [Box set, Limited Edition]

Gustav Mahler Audio CD
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Audio CD (10 May 2010)
  • SPARS Code: ADD
  • Number of Discs: 18
  • Format: Box set, Limited Edition
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • ASIN: B003BZC2RU
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 326,798 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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CD Description

The first ever Mahler: Complete Edition is a combined effort by Decca and Deutsche Grammophon to collect the the ten symphonies, "Das Lied von der Erde", "Das klagende Lied", the song cycles, the "Knaben Wunderhorn" songs and early works--in benchmark recordings by a great assembly of Mahler conductors, singers and orchestras--into one 18 CD box set. Each Symphony gets a different conductor: Abbado ("No. 6"), Bernstein ("No. 5"), Boulez ("No. 4"), Chailly ("No. 10"), Giulini ("Das Lied"), Haitink ("No. 3"), Karajan ("No. 9"), Kubelik ("No. 1"), Mehta ("No. 2"), Sinopoli ("No. 7"), Solti ("No. 8"). The orchestras include some of the finest in the world: Berliner Philharmoniker, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestrea, Philharmonia Orchestra, Wiener Philharmoniker. Singers featured include Thomas Hampson, Anne Sofie von Otter and Thomas Quasthoff (their Grammy-winning "Knaben Wunderhorn lieder", with Abbado), Ileana Cotrubas and Christa Ludwig in the "Resurrection Symphony", Maureen Forrester in the "Third", Juliane Banse in the "Fourth", Francisco Araiza and Brigitte Fassbaender in "Das Lied von der Erde", and a starry array in "No. 8"). In addition, rarities like "Das klagende Lied", rejected movements from the First and Second Symphonies, Mahler’s early songs and chamber music are also included, while the booklet includes a newly commissioned article by Christian Wildhagen and full tracklist.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars It could be really complete... 12 Jun 2013
By capezio
Format:Audio CD
Sometimes is difficult to understand DG's productions.

Taking the opportunity of Mahler's 150th birthday DG editors select what they understand are the best on its vast catalog, together with PHILIPS and DECCA recordings.

What you get is really a complete recording box with either the quartet for piano and strings in a 18 CD pack in a real budget price (nearly US$ 2,50 per CD), on cardboard sleeves (at the time of my purchase).
In a normal pick you'll spend some US$ 270,00 (+-US$15,00 per CD) to collect everything you get here.
This is the best part.

Some points to consider are:
1-Why didn't DG add some SACD/Hybrid recordings on the pack, that has normally a better sound and are already available?

2- In a tempting offer like this, advanced Mahlerians may be a bit disappointed to see inside the open box a so skinny booklet with only 03 pages of notes on all works included on the pack!
With such a vast material about the composer is incomprehensible why DG didn't put a bit more paper / information on the booklet, considering this is the "complete 150th" edition.

There aren't even any letter of the words of all the lieder collections included.
How someone will follow them if don't speak German, like me?

3- If you are already a Mahler listener you'll maybe find some duplicates that you already know but, considering it's completude, the price of each CD isolated and some rare works included, it worth the value.

This is surely a "complete box of recordings" but if you want to go deeper on Mahler's universe you'll have to pick some other information about him on the WEB.

It's really disappointing to get a "complete" box that lacks important background information about what is recorded.
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11 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars almost... 5 Jun 2010
Format:Audio CD
...but not quite.Sinopoli,as already stated,should not have been included,I cannot believe they failed to have the Ferrier Das Lied,an ommission of scandalous proportions, and several other niggles...If you are wise,you'll look out the EMI box,also containing every scrap,but some performances of everlasting worth,every one a gem,not quite so hit and miss as the DG.A different conductor for each is not their intention,and all the better for it-there are 2 or 3 Rattles,for example,but why not?Good as this is,it's not quite THERE.
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11 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars DG Celebrate Mahler Year With A Big Box 29 May 2010
By Philoctetes TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
I feel sorry for the laborious effort made by my fellow reviewer to provide a tracklisting for this box. Sorry friend but we can read it on the Download page from Amazon, and more easily.

This box is a commendable offering of the complete works, marginally more expensive than EMI's and I think marginally less interesting. And with some curious omissions. No Fischer-Dieskau! What!

Drawn from the combined catalogues of Decca and DG. Imagine, if EMi had been part of a triumvirate, we could have had the greatest Mahler set ever! As it is, DG give us Sinopoli's No.7 (why? It's sh%*!) and Bernstein's overrated No.5. They miss the chance to give us Lennie's Wunderhorn recording (Schmidt/Popp), instead we have Boulez's, which is a wasted opportunity. We also get lots of Hampson in the lieder, in what were surely over manicured readings by Lennie in his dotage.

Elsewhere, much to admire. Chailly's Klagende, Kubelik's No.1 (obviously, but why not No.5 as well?), Karajan's No.9 (live?), and Abbado's No.6 (from Berlin). There's even Mahler's orchestration of Weber's drei Pintos!

As comprehensive as the EMI, and more impressive in its selection for certain symphonies, but generally poorer in the choice of lieder interpreters. That reminds me: no Christa Ludwig! Ah!

Pick and mix is the best bet for real Mahlerians. Newbies could do alot worse, but I think the EMI box is fractionally better value for money.
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14 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Content of the 18 discs 21 May 2010
By C. X. Linton-Willoughby TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
CD 1: Mahler: Symphony No.1; "Blumine"

Gustav Mahler (1860 - 1911)

Symphony No.1 in D

1 1. Langsam. Schleppend [14:31]
2 2. Kräftig bewegt [7:04]
3 3. Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen [10:37]
4 4. Stürmisch bewegt [17:39]
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

5 "Blumine". Andante allegretto [6:01]
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa

Total Playing Time[55:52]

CD 2: Mahler: Symphony No.2

Gustav Mahler (1860 - 1911)

Symphony No.2 in C minor - "Resurrection"

1 1. Allegro maestoso. Mit durchaus ernstem und feierlichem Ausdruck [21:03]
2 2. Andante moderato. Sehr gemächlich [10:12]
3 3. Scherzo: In ruhig fliessender Bewegung [10:28]
Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta

4 4. "O Röschen rot! Der Mensch liegt in grösster Not!" (Sehr feierlich aber schlicht) Text from Des Knaben Wunderhorn: "Urlicht" [5:30]
Christa Ludwig, Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta

5 5a. Im Tempo des Scherzos. Wild herausfahrend - [9:45]
6 5b. Maestoso. Sehr zurückhaltend - Wieder zurückhaltend - [7:33]
7 5c. Sehr langsam und gedehnt - [2:21]
Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta

8 5d. "Aufersteh'n, ja aufersteh'n wirst du" (Langsam. Misterioso) - Text after F.G. Klopstock: "Auferstehung" [6:39]
Ileana Cotrubas, Wiener Staatsopernchor, Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta

9 5e. "O glaube, mein Herz, o glaube" (Etwas bewegter) Text after F.G.
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Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent for what it is 10 Aug 2010
By Ray Barnes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
If this set were not available at super budget price I would not be giving it 5 stars. The documentation consists of little more than a short essay "A Prophet of Pluralism", which I did not find very informative; lists and tracking of the CDs, and some photos. There are no libretti or commentaries on the individual works, but, for the price that is hardly surprising. The outside of the box does not indicate which of the two Karajan recordings of the 9th Symphony is included; it is the second, from live performances.

It is quite a novel idea to have 11 different conductors for the symphonies and Das Lied von der Erde. Listening to these performances, all of which are good or better in my view, leads me to question the notion of a definitive Mahler interpretation or performance. Granted, the choices for each performance will not please everyone. I personally feel it's not unreasonable to go with Karajan's live 9th or particularly Solti's 8th, if these conductors are to be represented by just one performance each.

The sound quality of the CDs I have heard from this set, thus far, is about the same as in prior releases. The Solti 8th from 1971 continues to sound larger than life. I found this overwhelming when first heard on cassette a long time ago, and now wonder if it is somewhat overdriven, inflated. The Kubelik 1st with the BRSO is clear and surprisingly rich in spite of its age, and lively. I wish there had been another version of the Blumine alternate second movement with the same ensemble, or at least by another conductor whose work is included in the anthology. Somehow, having just 6 minutes of Ozawa with the BSO on a 18 CD set seems wrong. The Mehta 2nd remains very enjoyable, especially the rich percussion detail. The timpani playing at the beginning of the scherzo is arresting. It is good to have this symphony complete on one CD at just over 81 minutes playing time with absolutely no constriction of the recording. To be candid I am not a big fan of this conductor but consider this performance in Vienna to be one of his finest recordings, alongside the superb Turandot. The Haitink 3rd is beautifully paced, played and sung, but the recording is just a bit thin compared to more recent rivals (such as Tennstedt on EMI). The sound quality of the Bernstein 5th also with the VPO by comparison, from around the same time, is not as rich and detailed, but still very satisfactory. I found this disc sounded much better in my SUV stereo than at home for some reason. The tempi are slow to moderate throughout the work, and the string playing is (not unexpectedly) very distinguished. The Boulez 4th in Cleveland has not been favourably reviewed, but it is not a bad performance. Personally I don't seem to "get" the first two movements regardless of the performers, but find the 3rd and 4th movements generally radiant and charming. This is no exception. The Totenfeier filler with Boulez conducting the Chicago Symphony is very successful, although it is a strange coupling to the 4th, given that it is an earlier version of the first movement of the 2nd. The Abbado 6th done live with the BPO has wonderful, powerful sonority, without feeling pushed too hard. There is a fine line between intensity and brutality, and it was not crossed. The andante moderato is placed second after the opening allegro energico, and speaking only for myself, I would have preferred the scherzo played second instead, since its opening, to my taste, seems to flow better after the end of the opening allegro. This should not deter anyone either way. Like the 2nd, it is complete on a single CD without loss of sound quality. The first hammer blow in the finale literally gave me goosebumps. This performance gets 5 stars in spite of the movement ordering.

The most pleasant surprise of the first 9 symphonies for me was the Sinopoli 7th. The second and third movements, with their wide leaps in musical line, in his hands, very much in my view pointed to the early works of Berg and Schoenberg. I was literally laughing out loud at the sheer audacity and originality of the writing. In spite of running to 86 minutes over 2 CDs, the performance left no feeling of dragging, except perhaps slightly in the second Nachtmusik, but that was compensated for by the rich detail of the exotic scoring. The Philharmonia and sound engineers rose to the challenge of this unique symphony. This piece has something of the feel of the 5th, with tender, intimate fourth movements, and final triumph over struggle and night yielding to day. This is my favourite performance of this difficult work heard to date, but I would be very interested to hear the Boulez recording.

The opening adagio of the 10th under Chailly is very well done. Regarding the remaining 4 movements, I feel unqualified to offer an opinion on the integrity of Deryck Cooke's edition. The performance was very good, the second scherzo especially atmospheric. At the least, it sounded very reminiscent of Mahler.

The Giulini recording with the BPO of Das Lied von der Erde is also a success. The tenor Francisco Araiza has come in for some criticism elsewhere, but he sounded fine to me. Brigitte Fassbaender sang beautifully. I got the impression the reading had a slight degree of reticence, as if the singers and conductor were trying to avoid overdramatizing the music, and trying to let it speak for itself. In my view, this feeling of restraint added an extra degree of meditativeness to the Abschied. That 30 minute stretch passed quickly. The playing was superlative, the sound quality pretty good, and overall, it was a very moving experience.

Des Knaben Wunderhorn (Youth's Magic Horn) was good fun and more relaxed listening. The scoring of the ninth song, Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt (St. Anthony of Padua's Sermon to the Fish), was used again in the Scherzo of the Resurrection Symphony, complete with the closing gong strike. The final Urlicht (Primal Light) became that symphony's fourth movement. It is fascinating to hear Mahler's complete works and observe this use and re-use of his music. Anne Sofie von Otter, Thomas Quasthoff and the Berlin Philharmonic under Abbado were all excellent. Fine sound too.

The CD of the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, Kindertotenlieder and 5 Ruckert Lieder, all from live performances by Thomas Hampson with Bernstein and the VPO, is also very good. While I prefer the music to be sung by a mezzo-soprano (have seen Dame Janet Baker live), this is perfectly acceptable as an alternative. The first set of songs were sparkling. Das klagende Lied is also a very fine performance in every way, with Brigitte Fassbaender singing beautifully again, and the recording quality is superb.

The final CD starts with 17 Lieder und Gesange aus der Jugendzeit (Songs and Airs from the Days of Youth), mostly settings of texts from Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Eight songs are accompanied by the Philharmonia Orchestra, of which 6 are sung by Bernd Weikl and conducted by Sinopoli, and the other 2 are sung by Thomas Hampson and conducted by Luciano Berio. Of the other 9 songs accompanied by piano, 5 are sung by Anne Sofie von Otter and played by Ralf Gothoni, and the other 4 are sung again by Hampson and played by David Lutz. There is some alternation back and forth between orchestral and piano songs in this set, which I found a little wearisome. The performances with orchestra have a similar bucolic vein to the early symphonies, and Bernd Weikl's singing was superb, especially in the longest song, Nicht wiedersehen (track 13). The Klavierquartettsatz is well played, very colorful, and superbly recorded. Mahler's piano writing here and in the songs is a nice surprise. The final item, Mahler's completion and orchestration of the Entr'acte of Weber's Die drei Pintos, with Mikhail Pletnev conducting the Russian National Orchestra, almost has the feel of an encore at the end of a very, very long concert. This work has Weber's charm and lightness of touch, and the opening horn note is very reminiscent of the beginning of the final movement of Mahler's 5th Symphony - it actually fooled me for a moment. No qualms here either. These latter two items are not easily found on disc elsewhere (not even in the EMI Complete Anthology) and are most welcome.

Overall, this remains a very good investment, although one should not feel compelled to live with these performances alone. Having heard this set in its entirety, and some performances more than once, it is a very fine tribute to Mahler. On the whole there is great vitality and energy in the writing and performances, which make one eager to hear more.
65 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good (and Complete) "Consensus" Box 1 Aug 2010
By John Van Note - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
A Good "Consensus" Box

From the liner notes: (Comments in parentheses-mine)
"The Decca / Deutsche Grammophon catalogue of Mahler recordings is unsurpassed. A major contribution to the anniversary celebration in 2010 is this first-ever Complete Mahler Edition, a combined effort of Decca and Deutsche Grammophon in an 18-CD super-budget box (as low as forty dollars on some Amazon Marketplace sites)-- with the ten symphonies, Das Lied von der Erde, (a complete) Das klagende Lied, the song cycles, the Knaben Wunderhorn songs and early works in benchmark recordings by a great assembly of Mahler conductors, singers, and orchestras...." split up as thirteen CDs of symphonies, five CDs of vocal music.

"Each symphony gets a different conductor, (listed here in alphabetical order) and the list is awesome: (according to Universal) Abbado (No. 6), Bernstein (No. 5), Boulez (No. 4), Chailly (No. 10), Giulini (Das Lied), Haitink (No. 3), Karajan (No. 9), Kubelik (No. 1), Mehta (No. 2), Sinopoli (No. 7), and Solti (No. 8). The orchestras are the finest in the world: Berliner Philharmoniker, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, and Wiener Philharmoniker."

One can never find agreement as to what is the "best" Mahler here, even among seasoned Mahler collectors who have admired the composer for decades. If you are coming to Mahler for the very first time, this is a splendid acquisition for you. "The list is awesome," but it is impossible to include historic recordings from the likes of a Walter and a Klemperer from other recording labels, and that is a big drawback. Universal might have considered a joint label venture here. This set would be best supplemented with the EMI set. For the symphonies, DG chose a lot of material which is already "out there" in very widely circulated complete sets which have long since been gobbled up by Mahler addicts long ago. They could not please all of the people with their selections, but I think that they have pleased most with their choices. So this is a consensus set, maybe a "politically correct" one in its way, reached by the general consensus of CD album sales or for those most likely to sell. A down side is that there is next to nothing historic in it. Most performances are good digital performances from orchestras with which I think Mahler himself would be pleased. The discarded "Blumine" movement is coupled with Kubelik's FIRST as an appendixes Track 5. Also included was the pleasant surprise of the rejected "Totenfeier" movement for Mahler's "Resurrection." About half of the movement was obviously reworked into the version which Mahler fanatics like me know today. Abbado in his SIXTH places the Scherzo (which is usually placed as the second movement of the SIXTH in the Erwin Ratz Revised Edition) as the third movement, after the Adagio (which is usually placed as the second movement). This was the original performing edition used by Mahler often in his lifetime. Quite often out of curiosity, just to hear the effect of it, I have programmed my compact disk player to play the symphony in this way on many occasions.

"Singers featured include Thomas Hampson (song-cycles, with Bernstein), Anne Sofie von Otter and Thomas Quasthoff (their Grammy-winning Knaben Wunderhorn lieder, with Abbado), Ileana Cotrubas and Christa Ludwig in the "Resurrection" Symphony, Maureen Forrester in the Third, Juliane Banse in the Fourth, Francisco Araiza and Brigitte Fassbaender in Das Lied von der Erde, and a starry array in No. 8. " Vocalists are not a problem, if there is any, with the set, only the performance choices as a whole, for some Mahler addicts.

"In addition, rarities like Das klagende Lied, rejected movements from the First and Second Symphonies, Mahler's early songs, and chamber music are included in the edition."

For me, the FIRST (a good but not the greatest Kubelik-would have preferred Solti here), FOURTH (an adequate Boulez-would have preferred Mehta`s Israel PO here), FIFTH an always angst ridden Bernstein), EIGHTH (the overrated and overly remastered Solti, again-I would have reluctantly preferred Abbado or Boulez, better yet, a reworked Lenny CBS here), and a complete DAS KLAGENDE LIED (a good Chailly) are duplicated with the set, but two thirds of the box are new performance acquisitions, so for me, I could not acquire the rest of the recordings for the price, so it was all a borderline steal. The Mehta analogue SECOND was at or near the top of its form, but I do prefer Walter and Klemper here, together with Lenny's earlier Sony effort with the NYPO. The Haitink THIRD was perhaps the best of his oeurve with Philips.

The prize of prizes in the box here for me is the von Karajan NINTH, perhaps equaled but not surpassed by the Bernstein BPO recording. And couple it with the missing incidental pieces like the Piano Quartet and Die drei Pintos fragment, (not easily to be had separately) and it is an additional incentive to buy for the missing material which I suspect many other people do not have.

And if the celebration isn't enough, there is a DG "People's Mahler Edition" (for some strange reason in a red colored box)coming soon to a music retail outlet near you. In this one, the final choices are still an open question, and you can go online and vote for your own personal favorite GM symphonies from 1-10! I think that the song cycles will remain the same.

Timings for the DG COMPLETE MAHLER EDITION are as follows:
CD 1: Mahler: Symphony No.1; "Blumine"
Symphony No.1 in D
1. 1. Langsam. Schleppend 14:31
2. 2. Kräftig bewegt 7:04
3. 3. Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen 10:37
4. 4. Stürmisch bewegt 17:39
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik
5. "Blumine". Andante allegretto 6:01
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa
Total Playing Time 55:52

CD 2: Mahler: Symphony No.2
Symphony No.2 in C minor - "Resurrection"
1. 1. Allegro maestoso. Mit durchaus ernstem und feierlichem Ausdruck 21:03
2. 2. Andante moderato. Sehr gemächlich 10:12
3. 3. Scherzo: In ruhig fliessender Bewegung 10:28
4. 4. "O Röschen rot! Der Mensch liegt in grösster Not!" (Sehr feierlich aber schlicht) Text from Des Knaben Wunderhorn: "Urlicht" 5:30
Christa Ludwig, Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta
5. 5a. Im Tempo des Scherzos. Wild herausfahrend - 9:45
6. 5b. Maestoso. Sehr zurückhaltend - Wieder zurückhaltend - 7:33
7. 5c. Sehr langsam und gedehnt - 2:21
Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta
8. 5d. "Aufersteh'n, ja aufersteh'n wirst du" (Langsam. Misterioso) - Text after F.G. Klopstock: "Auferstehung"6:39
Ileana Cotrubas, Wiener Staatsopernchor, Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta
9. 5e. "O glaube, mein Herz, o glaube" (Etwas bewegter) Text after F.G. Klopstock: "Auferstehung" 7:39
Ileana Cotrubas, Christa Ludwig, Wiener Staatsopernchor, Wiener Philharmoniker, Zubin Mehta
Total Playing Time 1:21:10

CD 3: Mahler: Symphony No.3, Part 1
Symphony No.3 in D minor
Part 1
1. 1. Kräftig. Entscheiden 32:17
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Bernard Haitink
Total Playing Time 32:17

CD 4: Mahler: Symphony No.3, Part 2
Symphony No.3 in D minor
Part 2
1. 2. Tempo di minuetto. Sehr mäßig 10:22
2. 3. Comodo. Scherzando. Ohne Hast 16:53
3. 4. Sehr langsam. Misterioso: "O Mensch! Gib acht!" 'O Mensch! Gib acht' 8:45
Maureen Forrester, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Bernard Haitink
4. 5. Lustig im Tempo und keck im Ausdruck: "Bimm Bamm. Es sungen drei Engel" 4:03
Maureen Forrester, Boy's Choir Of The St. Willisbrorduskerk In Rotterdam, Women's Chorus Of The Netherlands Radio, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Bernard Haitink
5. 6. Langsam. Ruhevoll. Empfunden 22:04
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Bernard Haitink
Total Playing Time 1:02:07

CD 5: Mahler: Symphonies Nos.4 & 2 "Resurrection", 1. Mvt. Totenfeier
Symphony No.4 in G
1. 1. Bedächtig. Nicht eilen - Recht gemächlich 15:17
2. 2. In gemächlicher Bewegung. Ohne Hast 9:29
3. 3. Ruhevoll (Poco adagio) 20:02
4. 4. Sehr behaglich: "Wir genießen die himmlischen Freuden" 8:42
Juliane Banse, The Cleveland Orchestra, Pierre Boulez
Symphony No.2 in C minor - "Resurrection"
5. Totenfeier (REJECTED MOVEMENT) 25:09
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Pierre Boulez
Total Playing Time 1:18:39

CD 6: Mahler: Symphony No.5
Symphony No.5 in C sharp minor
1. 1. Trauermarsch (In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt - Plötzlich schneller. Leidenschaftlich. Wild - Tempo I) 14:32
2. 2. Stürmisch bewegt. Mit größter Vehemenz - Bedeutend langsamer - Tempo I subito
14:59
3. 3. Scherzo (Kräftig, nicht zu schnell) 19:01
4. 4. Adagietto (Sehr langsam) 11:13
5. 5. Rondo-Finale (Allegro) 15:00
Wiener Philharmoniker, Leonard Bernstein
Total Playing Time 1:14:45

CD 7: Mahler: Symphony No.6
Symphony No.6 in A minor
1. 1. Allegro energico, ma non troppo. Heftig aber Markig 22:48
2. 2. (3.) Andante moderato 13:57
3. 3. (2.) Scherzo (Wuchtig) 12:43
4. 4. Finale (Allegro moderato) 29:44
Berliner Philharmoniker, Claudio Abbado
Total Playing Time 1:19:36

CD 8: Mahler: Symphony No.7, Movements 1 - 3
Symphony No.7 in E minor
1. 1. Langsam - Allegro 24:36
2. 2. Nachtmusik (Allegro moderato) 17:04
3. 3. Scherzo 9:54
Philharmonia Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli
Total Playing Time 51:34

CD 9: Mahler: Symphony No.7, Movements 4 + 5
Symphony No.7 in E minor
1. 4. Nachtmusik (Andante amoroso) 17:35
2. 5. Rondo - Finale (Allegro ordinario - Allegro moderato ma energico) 18:19
Philharmonia Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli
Total Playing Time 35:54

CD 10: Mahler: Symphony No.8
Symphony No.8 in E flat - "Symphony of a Thousand"
Heather Harper, Lucia Popp, Yvonne Minton, Helen Watts, René Kollo, John Shirley-Quirk, Martti Talvela, Wiener Sängerknaben, Wiener Singverein, Wiener Staatsopernchor, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Georg Solti
Total Playing Time 1:19:39

CD 11: Mahler: Symphony No.9, 1st and 2nd Movement
Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan
Total Playing Time 45:00

CD 12: Mahler: Symphony No.9, 3rd and 4th Movement
Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan
Total Playing Time 39:42

CD 13: Mahler: Symphony No.10
Symphony No.10 in F sharp (unfinished) Ed. Deryck Cooke
1. 1. Adagio 25:53
2. 2. Scherzo 11:53
3. 3. Purgatorio 4:22
4. 4. Scherzo 11:29
5. 5. Finale 25:08
Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Riccardo Chailly
Total Playing Time 1:18:45

CD 14: Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde
Das Lied von der Erde
1. Das Trinklied vom Jammer der Erde 8:34
2. Der Einsame im Herbst 9:42
3. Von der Jugend 3:17
4. Von der Schönheit 7:33
5. Der Trunkene im Frühling 4:17
6. Der Abschied 30:23
Brigitte Fassbaender, Berliner Philharmoniker, Carlo Maria Giulini
Total Playing Time 1:03:46

CD 15: Mahler: Des Knaben Wunderhorn
Thomas Quasthoff, Anne Sofie von Otter, Berliner Philharmoniker, Claudio Abbado
Total Playing Time 57:04

CD 16: Mahler: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen; Kindertotenlieder; Rückert-Lieder
Thomas Hampson, Wiener Philharmoniker, Leonard Bernstein
Total Playing Time 1:07:58

CD 17: Mahler: Das klagende Lied
Das Klagende Lied
1. Part 1: Waldmärchen 28:09
2. Part 2: Der Spielmann 17:39
3. Part 3: Hochzeitsstück 18:33
Susan Dunn, Brigitte Fassbaender, Werner Hollweg, Markus Baur, Stadtischer Musikverein, Dusseldorf, Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Riccardo Chailly
Total Playing Time 1:04:21

CD 18: Mahler: Lieder und Gesänge aus der Jugendzeit
Songs from "Des Knaben Wunderhorn"
Orchestration: Harold Byrns
1. Frühlingsmorgen 2:34
Bernd Weikl, Philharmonia Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli
2. Erinnerung 3:06
Anne Sofie von Otter, Ralf Gothoni
Lieder und Gesänge aus der Jugendzeit
(Arrangements for Orchestra by Luciano Berio)
3. Hans und Grethe 2:42
Thomas Hampson, Philharmonia Orchestra, Luciano Berio
4. Serenade (from: "Don Juan") 1:29
5. Phantasie (aus "Don Juan" von Tirso de Molina) 2:23
Anne Sofie von Otter, Ralf Gothoni
Songs from "Des Knaben Wunderhorn"
Orchestration: Harold Byrns
6. Um schlimme Kinder artig zu machen 1:40
Bernd Weikl, Philharmonia Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli
7. Ich ging mit Lust durch einen grünen Wald 3:53
8. Aus! Aus! "Heute marschieren wir!" 2:08
Anne Sofie von Otter, Ralf Gothoni
Lieder und Gesänge aus der Jugendzeit
9. Starke Einbildungskraft (Des Knaben Wunderhorn) 1:12
Thomas Hampson, David Lutz
Songs from "Des Knaben Wunderhorn"
Orchestration: Harold Byrns
10. Zu Straßburg auf der Schanz 4:00
11. Ablösung im Sommer 1:32
Bernd Weikl, Philharmonia Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli
Lieder und Gesänge aus der Jugendzeit
(Arrangements for Orchestra by Luciano Berio)
12. Scheiden und Meiden 2:12
Thomas Hampson, Philharmonia Orchestra, Luciano Berio
Songs from "Des Knaben Wunderhorn"
Orchestration: Harold Byrns
13. Nicht wiedersehen 5:42
14. Selbstgefühl 1:56
Bernd Weikl, Philharmonia Orchestra, Giuseppe Sinopoli

Frühe Lieder
15. Im Lenz 2:59
16. Winterlied 4:04
17. Maitanz im Grünen 2:24
Thomas Hampson, David Lutz

Piano Quartet in A minor (1876) Quartet for piano, violin, viola and cello
18. 1. Nicht zu schnell 11:05
Gidon Kremer, Veronika Hagen, Clemens Hagen, Oleg Maisenberg

Carl Maria von Weber (1786 - 1826)
Die drei Pintos (completed by Gustav Mahler)
19. Entr'acte 6:18
Russian National Orchestra, Mikhail Pletnev
Total Playing Time 1:03:19

Mahler: The Complete Works - 150th Anniversary Box
28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great set, Great price 13 July 2010
By C. Scott Harrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I guess you could say this was a best buy for someone who was looking for a complete Mahler box set. Yes, it even has the piano quartet and the Drei Pintos(Weber) overture. All of these recordings have been issued before, but this is a pretty commendable collection. At under $4 a disc it is quite a good value. Some of the performances could be said to be "best choices"; Bernstein's Vienna 5th, Solti's 8th, Karajan's 9th. Others you might choose to quibble with. A great value and worth it even for a die-hard Mahlerite like myself. Five stars. Comes with a booklet with listings and a short essay titled "A Prophet of Pluralism"(whatever that means!). I would have preferred original album notes (and at least one Fischer-Dieskau recording in the lot), but for this price you can't have everything, can you?
Try some of the other DG value sets; Bach Sacred Works, Organ works, Beethoven, Schumann etc:. Thanks DG!!
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost Perfect 31 Dec 2010
By Thomas Martin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Admittedly, I'm a completist, and this set offered a treasure trove of recordings too hard to resist. Many of the recordings included in this collection I was already familiar with and/or own with a couple of exceptions. The Kubelik First was such a wonderful surprise! And coupled with the Ozawa "Blumine" movement, it became almost the perfect Mahler 1st for me (perhaps even edging out the premier Ormandy recording with the discarded movement). The major disappointment in the set is the Boulez Fourth. In a word, it's just "dull". Since, obviously, DG doesn't own the legendary Szell Sony recording, they do own the Chailly, Karajan, the timeless Mengelberg, and Bernstein's Concertgebouw performance with the ever-controversial boy soprano- any of those would have been so much better than Boulez; otherwise, this set is a must own for the completist or general collector. This set easily eclipses the EMI set (or DG's superfluous "People's Choice Award" set). Anyway, acquire and enjoy!
9 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A is for Awesome, B is for Bargain 22 Sep 2010
By Giordano Bruno - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
No, I haven't bought this 'Complete Edition', and I don't intend to. I've heard every performance in it except one of the song cycles. I already own a bunch of them, and I have a favorite and second-favorite of each of the symphonies. I'm posting this review just to alert my 'amazon friends' to another fantastic bargain. In the post-Bush economy, the only thing everybody can afford is music.

However, I do have some reservations about the selections in the box. My favorite Mahler-conductor, Sir John Barbirolli, isn't represented; Barbirolli's recordings with Janet Baker are indispensable in any Mahler library, so there you have the dilemma: if you are an avid Mahler fan, this convenient and modestly-priced box will NOT put paid to your spending or to the quest for the best. Also, there are a couple of selections that I consider second- or third-rate -- Solti, Haitinck, and Mehta, to be specific -- plus one that other people love but I hate, the 9th Symphony interpreted by Herbert von Karajan. Nevertheless, this is one of the more consistent and convincing "Complete Edition" releases I've encountered.

POSTCRIPT: Ooops! One of the commenters on this review has alerted me to a competitive complete Mahler from EMI. Buyer, be smart! Comparison will be wise.
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