Watch now

Quantity:1
£19.06 + £1.26 delivery
In stock. Sold by RAREWAVES USA
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: DVD in VERY GOOD condition.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£59.90
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: Synergy Data
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Magnolia [DVD] [1999] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Magnolia [DVD] [1999] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

165 customer reviews

Price: £19.06
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
2 new from £19.06 13 used from £0.67

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Magnolia instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£19.06 In stock. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Magnolia [DVD] [1999] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] + Boogie Nights [DVD] [1998] + Punch-Drunk Love [DVD] [2010]
Price For All Three: £28.38

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Language: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Studio: New Line Home Video
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (165 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00003CWTI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 154,740 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Magnolia (New Line Platinum Ser

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Emma on 19 Nov. 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I read a lot - at least by most people's standards. And I watch quite a few films. And the vast majority of what I read/watch leaves me feeling just so-so. Take it or leave it. Though now and then I'll think something is good. Maybe very good. Five-stars-out-of-five good.

And then - very, very occasionally - you come across something which is another-order-of-magnitude good. Something which just takes your breath away and doesn't give it back until you turn the last page or watch the closing credits roll up in front of you. And you realise that what it's all been for. That's why you've ploughed through all those novels or sat through all those movies. To get to here.

Last year I got there with Victor Pelevin's The Clay Machine Gun. Last night I found myself there again when I watched a film I knew nothing about but had popped on my Lovefilm list after seeing an interesting review. Magnolia. Where was I in 1999 when this was released? What was I doing? How could it possibly have come to a point where, nine years later, I'd never even heard of this film?

I won't even try to describe it to you - beyond saying that it follows the interlocking lives of a series of characters in Los Angeles - but it was absolutely captivating. Several minutes into the opening montage I had that feeling of absolute 'rightness'. That sense that there was absolutely nothing in the world I'd rather be doing at this moment than sitting here, laptop propped up on my knees, watching what was unfolding in front of me. And three hours later (yes, it's long, but then, hell, so is War and Peace) I was still captivated. And open-mouthed. Literally. Towards the end my jaw actually dropped, I was so astounded and moved and transfixed by what was happening on the screen.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Morris TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Aug. 2011
Format: DVD
Magnolia is a mosaic-film about several people with interwoven fates. A dying game show producer (Jason Robards) reaches out to his self-obsessed self-help guru son (Tom Cruise) with the help of his nurse (Phillip Seymour Hoffman). His trophy drug-addicted wife (Julianne Moore) uses his illness as a way to get access to prescription drugs. The presenter (Phillip Baker Hall) of the game show "What do kids know" is also dying of cancer and reaches out to his coke-addict daughter (Melora Waters) who begins to date a romantically-clueless but well-intentioned policeman (John C. Reilly) whilst the current (Jeremy Blackman) and the former champion (William H. Macy) of the game show struggle with their fleeting fame and consequent lives.

Whilst the characters go about their day-to-day lives, they all seem to struggle with certain aspects of life but rarely the same issue; some are romantically inept, others are addicts or have serious health problems, but what brings them together is their ability to fill in the blanks in the other people. Not all of the plotlines meet up with some rather tenuous connections in places but as the film slowly unfurls you are drawn into the relations between the roles.

Magnolia is an epic masterpiece that tries to teach us more about life and what really matters in it. We see people on their deathbed reach out to try and make amends with family members they have wronged in the past. We see vulnerabilities in people that seem brash & arrogant on the outside but are really deeply insecure. Most importantly we see people make the leap of faith that may allow them to escape their desperately unhappy lives and this instils hope in the audience.

But Magnolia is simply relentless in it's onslaught.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. Gordon TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 Nov. 2010
Format: DVD
Even braver and deeper emotionally than Paul Thomas Anderson's
wonderful 'Boogie Nights', and in some ways a more mature, if less
blazingly dynamic work. Full of amazing shots, amazing performances.
The epic, multi-layered film 'Short Cuts' wanted to be.

The biblical ending doesn't quite work
for me. I appreciate the ideas behind it, but it's an ending that's
less emotional than the film that proceeded it. And a few
moments of irony are forced. That was true in 'Boogie Nights' too, but
because that film had a lighter, more self-mocking touch, even the
heavy handed moments didn't stick out.

None-the-less, this is a must see film, overflowing with great
performances, unconventional storytelling, heartbreaking moments, and
an honest look at where we are and who we are as a society.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 33 people found the following review helpful By pt.wilson@ukgateway.net on 1 Feb. 2001
Format: DVD
It saddens me, and at the same time makes me chuckle slightly, reading the reviews of those that deem this film 'too long', 'boring' and so on. It's not confusing when you realise that the film is about different aspects of life, and the wonderfully uncategorisable people that reside in it.
It's a long movie, but its epic scale demand this length. 'The Characters aren't interesting' said one review...well let me say this: if you need a character to be simple, unsophisticated, happy-go-lucky and straight out of the Hollywood back-catalogue, then this might be the case; For those of us that love really intelligent and engaging films, Magnolia hits all the right notes.
The singing scene will split audiences down the middle, but it certainly stays in your memory long after the final credits. Infact, the whole film, from each wonderfully rendered character study to the brilliant details such as the biblical allusions of the plague of frogs, is mesmerising.
If the film starts rather confusingly, it's purely because the it does SO much in 3 hours. It's not slow moving in terms of emotional intensity or the sheer realism of the astonshing events that make up the lives of those we watch. And the result? - A film that, like American Beauty -far more cinema-friendly for many, I'm sure, (but possibly the inferior movie) explores the amazing details of life, love and death that pervade everyone's existence.
I loved it. And if you've got this far in the review, you will too. Buy it.
Regards,
Peter Wilson (London)Email your views to me!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback