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Maggot Moon Hardcover – 30 Aug 2012

87 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Hot Key Books (30 Aug. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1471400042
  • ISBN-13: 978-1471400049
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 254,612 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

The outstanding teenage novel of the autumn, arresting and original and written in a singular voice, is Sally Gardner's MAGGOT MOON... Narrated by a boy with dyslexia, Standish Tredwell, it takes you inside the workings of his mind...as well as offering up something much darker: a parable about the perils of totalitarianism. Despite its simple language, its a disturbing read, but it also has a hopeful message - that a teenager, especially one with dyslexia, can have agency in the world. --Lorna Bradbury, The Telegraph

Dazzling, chilling, breathtaking. A perfect book. --Meg Rosoff

startlingly original, horribly gripping … an inspirational [story] which deserves many prizes --Amanda Craig, The Times

About the Author

At a young age, Sally Gardner was branded unteachable by some and sent to various schools, until she was eventually diagnosed at the age of twelve as being severely dyslexic. Sally is now an avid spokesperson for dyslexia; she sees it as a gift, not a disability, and is passionately trying to change how dyslexics are perceived by society. Her first full-length novel, I, CORIANDER, won the Nestle Children s Book Prize Gold Award in 2005. THE RED NECKLACE was shortlisted for the Guardian Book Prize in 2007. Her most recent book, THE DOUBLE SHADOW, has been hailed as an astonishing departure for a writer who has found a new and very distinctive voice.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By library4delinquents on 7 Jan. 2013
Format: Hardcover
This is the first book I have read in 2013, and boy has it raised the bar for whatever else I read this year. I think the blurb tells you pretty much all you need to know, so I won't summarise any further - it's one of those occasions where you want to tell people `I won't give too much away - just read it!'.
It's written in deceptively simple prose and in that sense, it's easy to read. I rattled through it because I wanted to find out what happened to Standish and Hector. But at some point I am going to have to go back and reread it to truly appreciate the fine craftsmanship of the writing. On another level, it doesn't make for easy reading because of the truly awful things going on in the Motherland - particularly when you realise with unease that similar things have indeed happened in human history. And are happening still. Sally Gardner is known for her `unique blend of magic and historical realism', and in this case there is the inkling that you might be reading a re-imagined history. It's all the more powerful because the world doesn't feel like some distant dystopia - it all seems very close to home. You really get a sense of the precariousness of the characters' situation, and though they are two very different books, I would compare the emotional response I got from reading Maggot Moon to what I experienced when I read Markus Zusak's The Book Thief. It's both heartbreaking and ultimately hopeful, because it illustrates the eternal presence of friendship, courage and hope in even the most dire of circumstances.
I instantly warmed to the narrator, Standish Treadwill, and his voice is one of those that echoes in your mind long after the story ends.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mork calling Orson on 3 May 2013
Format: Paperback
An odd little book that really left me thinking. Standish is a great narrator with lovely, quirky ways of describing things and telling his story. Regarding other reviewers' comments about violence and language - there is violence, but it isn't graphic - it's told the way it is without sensationalism. Nor is it done without reason - it gives a better understanding of the State they're living under. (And the perpetrator is punished). The language too is used for purpose, not for shock value. I don't know what the recommended age is for this, but would have no problem letting my 12 year old read it - in fact, I will encourage it - it's a thought-provoking, clever, and refreshingly different read. While the ending isn't what I wanted to happen (don't want to give anything away!), I'm glad the author chose it - it was right for the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bill HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on 14 Oct. 2014
Format: Paperback
This is a super read, like a cross between Orwell's 1984 and The Boy With The Striped Pyjamas. Standish Treadwell is in his early teens. He lives with his grandpa in a place called Zone Seven, which is part of a future, totalitarian state called the Motherland. People who don't conform to the Motherland's strict criteria for mental and physical fitness - Standish is dyslexic - or who break any rules, are banished to Zone Seven. Disobedient people suddenly go missing in the middle of the night, taken away by the men in leather coats. The death penalty is used liberally.
A boy named Hector and his parents move into Standish's home. The two boys, just like the two kids in The Boy With The Striped Pyjamas, become inseparable friends. Standish has a plan to try to thwart the Motherland's plans for World domination, and the book builds inexorably to an exciting climax.
The fates of the two boys are intertwined and told in a very moving fashion. The prose style is simplistic, but very effective, it reminded me of John Wyndham's simple, but very efficient, prose in The Day Of The Triffids.
The governing regime of the Motherland is just like Orwell's dystopian society in 1984 - there is covert surveillance of people in their homes, and individuals are rewarded for snitching on people, who are guilty of the most harmless breaches of petty rules.
It's not rocket science to work out that this sad story is an allegory for Hitler's Germany - the Fatherland - and the Nazi persecution of the Jewish people. It's a moving and upsetting book. I read a lot of books aimed at teenagers, to vet them before my 12 year old daughter reads them, and this book, just like the equally good The Bunker Diary,will be kept hidden from her for at least another couple of years.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bookworm on 15 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
"Standish, wake up, you fricking, daydreaming bastard! Wake up! Wake up or you'll be dead like me."

In Standish Treadwell's world, when people go missing, you don't call the police. You stay quiet. You pretend they never existed. You hope no one notices you because if they do, you're next.

Opening this novel I was expecting a pre-teen adventure story. Instead I was thrust into a society ruled by propaganda, brutality and betrayal. A place where survival was the only thing you could strive for and most would sacrifice their neighbours to achieve it.

Here lives our protagonist, `Standish Treadwell. Can't read, can't write. Standish Treadwell isn't bright.' Standish Treadwell is dyslexic, and accustomed to abuse in school. He lives in a street filled with the ghosts of those who have vanished. Only he and his grandfather remain, and they are being watched. They converse in whispers and never mention their secret. A secret that could topple the Motherland.

Sally Gardener's haunting, vicious dystopian novel is an incredible addition to Young Adult Fiction; it exhibits a masterful use of suspense and stands alone within the multitude of books I've read this year.
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