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Made In Britain: How the nation earns its living Paperback – 3 May 2012

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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus (3 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349123780
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349123783
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.1 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Could not be more relevant Scotland on Sunday A lively, upbeat account of the way we make our living -- Independent On Sunday Sean O'Grady Hits the spot. Upbeat, balanced and ... filled with interesting facts ... An engaging book written by an author whose passion and command of his subject shine through City AM

Book Description

A brilliant, thought-provoking look at British manufacturing industries, and whether it matters that we don't produce like we used to, from the much-loved Today presenter, Evan Davis

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Gabriela Castro on 7 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a fantastic book to read! It will open your mind about what Britain still has to offer the world and challenge your views on services v manufacturing. I personally work with British exporters and see a lot of what Evan Davis writes about put into practice every day. The British economy has changed and it keeps changing - will we embrace the change and feel proud of our achievements and excited about what's ahead? A clever, thought-provoking book that you'll go back to again and again.
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By os TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback
'Made in Britain' is an entertaining and enlightening myth-busting analysis of the British economy, an ideal starting point for the non-specialist or enquiringly student , with its focus more or less exclusively on private sector activity. Evan Davis writes with a flowing, good humoured light touch. His central theme is that yes Britain is very much open for business. However, it has suffered and continues to suffer from being rather too dependent on the service sector, consumption rather than investment growth (hence the significant o- going balance of payments problem) and issues relating to regional imbalances, particularly concerning skills mismatches and labour immobility.

One of the most encouraging aspects of this book is the discussion around the general productivity, creatively and global reach of many British firms. Car building, tourism, brand creation, finance and top level engineering innovation are all sectors in which the UK excels. As a nation we are also a major destination for foreign Direct Investment, which not only creates jobs but leads to increased exports, expertise and the development of local suppler bases.

The problem is of course is that there are not enough success stories, nor are they spread widely enough for the benefits of growth to filter through to a significant proportion of the UK's population. Even so Davis is charmingly up-beat. Suggesting that the global as well as the national economy is in constant flux. Yesterday we made ships, today we make cars and sell financial services, tomorrow who knows? The point is to be competitive, enterprising and more inclined to save rather than consume.
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Format: Hardcover
Economics was dubbed "the dismal science" by Victorian historian Thomas Carlyle - reacting to the doom-laden population predictions of Thomas Malthus - but this entertainingly written and cleverly researched book is anything but dismal. It elicits a mood of optimism and potential when looking at the history of and prospects for the British economy. It is a well-argued antidote to the current economic gloom.

Evan Davis is a well known economist and British broadcaster who made his name with shows like Dragons Den but in writing Made in Britain he shows a deep and knowledgeable engagement with how British industry developed and the sort of businesses that are creating value today. His argument is that the economy is always in flux and the challenge is to get the right balance of manufacturing, services and the creation of intellectual property. He argues, and clearly shows, that those in love with nostalgic, sepia-toned notions of the sanctity of manufacturing are just as narrow minded as those who argue that we will end up us a purely service based nation. In the aftermath of the debt laden financial crash it is the balance that we must rediscover.

I missed all the BBC broadcasts which accompanied this publication but I can attest that the book stands alone as a good read and a thought provoking analysis. It is perhaps a bit of an indictment of the BBC that the series, only broadcast very recently is no longer available on the iPlayer or DVD. A change of BBC policy may be required for such genuinely valuable and timeless programmes.

Another well used phrase - this from JM Keynes - is that "practical men are slaves of some defunct economist.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By hfffoman TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Jun. 2011
Format: Hardcover
This morning I heard on the Today Programme that Max Hastings has been slating the British as idle and useless compared with the Chinese. John Humphreys must have been itching to say, "That's a load of tosh and my colleague Evan Davis's book explains exactly why". Well, I can't be certain that John Humphreys has read the book but I have, and I will never be deceived by ignorant raving about Britain again. Reading it actually changed my opinion.

"Made in Britain" is an extraordinary combination - a serious book about economics which is entertaining, easy to read, easy to understand, balanced and impregnably sound in its judgements. The author is not just a journalist but a respected economist with a background at Oxford, Harvard, London Business School and the Institute of Fiscal Studies.

The book is unfortunately littered with typos. The author must have been furious with the BBC for screwing up the schedule so that it went to print before it had been properly edited. But, as he points out astutely in chapter 11, organisations protected from market forces with a licence to collect money, can become too much of a good thing.

This is pretty much a must-read for anyone interested in the state of Britain or worried about our future.
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